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Honor System

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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
Los Angeles' Metro rail system has finally grown up, so it should be no surprise that it would start treating Angelenos like transit adults and demand that riders pay a fare (and make up to $9 million annually in the process). Starting today, the Los Angeles County Metropolitican Transportation Authority is finally beginning to phase out its well-meaning but financially flawed honor system (I can only imagine what New Yorkers thought of that), which practically invites fare evaders to take a free ride.
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TRAVEL
December 16, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: In looking recently at Enterprise's car rental rates in the Los Angeles area, I notice that it stipulates that the car must remain in California, Arizona and Nevada. I chose another agency that did not have such a restriction. Do they have a tracking device in the vehicle? What are the consequences if I travel to other areas? Also, when I returned a different rental car, this one in Portland, Ore., the agency told me to bring a gas receipt from a station within five miles of the airport to show that the tank was filled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | By Jon Schleuss
Julio Maciel was headed home on the Expo light-rail line in downtown L.A. on a recent weekday. He entered at the Pico station, sat down and waited for a train headed south. But when he walked inside, he didn't pay. Maciel thought he had paid, he said, because he had bought an unlimited day pass. He didn't know he needed to tap it against a shiny, metal validator by the entrance. "I didn't see any signs," Maciel said. The Pico station is long and slender and has two entrances at either end where the validators stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2013 | By Jon Schleuss
Julio Maciel was headed home on the Expo light-rail line in downtown L.A. on a recent weekday. He entered at the Pico station, sat down and waited for a train headed south. But when he walked inside, he didn't pay. Maciel thought he had paid, he said, because he had bought an unlimited day pass. He didn't know he needed to tap it against a shiny, metal validator by the entrance. "I didn't see any signs," Maciel said. The Pico station is long and slender and has two entrances at either end where the validators stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The quirky honor system on Los Angeles' subway might be nearing the end of the line--not because of scofflaws, but to free up police to thwart other crimes and terrorism, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority says. Under a plan expected to be presented to the MTA's board on July 18, turnstiles would go up at Red Line stations from downtown L.A. to North Hollywood, ending a 9-year-old system that trusted subway riders to purchase tickets or risk being fined $250 by police.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | Tom O'Neil
Emmy Award voting is different in one key way from the process used to select Oscar, Grammy and Tony winners: Voters must weigh a sample of every nominee's work before deciding each category. In the Oscar contest, that restriction applies only to such specialty categories as foreign-language film and documentaries. At the Emmys, it applies to all categories. Voters are restricted to participating in only four categories related to their peer group (actors on actors, writers on writers, etc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1993 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Thursday, I took a ride on the wild side. Call me a scofflaw, swindler, sneak, scoundrel or unabashed malefactor. I'll 'fess up to the crime. I defied the Red Line's "honor system," brazenly slipping onto a subway train without paying the mere fare of a quarter. It was a bold, impudent move, a brush with danger, a taste of life on the edge. Some might say irresponsible, morally bankrupt, a breach of civic duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1994 | BERT ELJERA
Just a few feet away from the busy intersection of Red Hill and Walnut avenues is a fruit stand that's as ordinary as any fruit stand around. It sells freshly picked Valencia oranges for $2 per bag and avocados at 50 cents each. A sign says self-service, and please, put the money in the metal box on the top shelf. No one watches. Anyone could just walk away and not bother to pay.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bart's Books in Ojai believes in doing business on the honor system. When the store is closed, customers may still buy books from a dozen four-shelf bookcases mounted on outside walls. The honor system is in effect all day on Mondays and every night of the week from the time the store closes at 5:30 p.m. until it reopens the next day at 10 a.m. And very few of the bookstore's customers ever abuse their privileges and neglect to drop their money into the box sitting outside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI
For a transplanted New Yorker whose car had just been totaled, the opening of Metro Rail's Red Line to Hollywood came at just the right time. While I waited for my insurance payments, I could stroll to the newly opened subway stop near my Hollywood home and take the Red Line to my office in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
Los Angeles' Metro rail system has finally grown up, so it should be no surprise that it would start treating Angelenos like transit adults and demand that riders pay a fare (and make up to $9 million annually in the process). Starting today, the Los Angeles County Metropolitican Transportation Authority is finally beginning to phase out its well-meaning but financially flawed honor system (I can only imagine what New Yorkers thought of that), which practically invites fare evaders to take a free ride.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
Every time I see someone walk through the subway turnstiles to board a train without using a Transit Access Pass card, I shake my head. “Not fair,” I think. Why am I paying $1.50 every time I want to ride the subway or light-rail lines when clearly, I could be doing this for free and probably get away with it? A $250 ticket is a scary proposition, but on my weekend trips on the Purple and Blue lines, I have yet to see someone get caught for evading the fare. The threat of being caught seems less and less likely with every trip.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEWARK, N.J. - Officials in New Jersey's third-largest county say they will not be able to process the majority of more than 3,000 faxed or emailed ballot applications by the end of election day. That means some Garden State voters displaced by super storm Sandy - hundreds in Essex County alone - may not be able to vote by the time polls close Tuesday evening, unless the state extends deadlines. Eight election officials have been processing the faxed and emailed applications, said Christopher Durkin, the Essex County clerk.
OPINION
January 4, 2012
A stadium sellout Re "Tracing Coliseum's fiscal decay," Dec. 31, 2011 If Californians ever needed further evidence that politicians should never be entrusted with money or assets, the stories about the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission are it. Members of the commission, two-thirds of whom are already on the public payroll, had trouble making just one meeting a month. It follows that they failed to notice business practices that let employees dig freely into the Coliseum cookie jar, while commissioners were feted with nice dinners and free tickets.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If you're in the mood for some feathery fluff of the happy-sappy-and-not-wholly-unpleasant sort and need a break from snark, there is "The Big Year. " This weirdly whimsical family comedy about competitive birders stars Jack Black, Owen Wilson and Steve Martin, and, yes, the humor is exactly as nerdy as that sounds. Did you hear the one about the pink-footed goose …? When toning down a comic trio that leans toward edgy to PG-lite, the humor that results is more of the mildly mirthful bland, um, brand.
TRAVEL
January 31, 2010 | By Phil Zimmerman, Reporting From Philo, Calif.
Until recently, the closest thing I'd come to a cooking class was watching the demo station at Trader Joe's. After seeing "Julie & Julia," I felt inspired to get in touch with my inner Julia Child. But who has the time and money to fly to Paris and study at Le Cordon Bleu? It was on my weekly trip to the farmers market that I learned about the Philo Apple Farm Cooking School, 120 miles northwest of San Francisco in the bucolic Anderson Valley wine country. Karen Bates, whose parents founded the French Laundry in Napa Valley in the late 1970s, offers, on the family-run farm, weekend cooking classes that focus on organic, seasonal ingredients.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Henry J. Voss and other top state regulators of California agriculture have ignored a requirement to report financial conflicts of interest when they disqualify themselves from taking official actions, it was learned Thursday. Instead, Agriculture Secretary Voss and his decision-makers have adhered to an informal departmental honor system, officials said. The failure to follow reporting rules is the latest controversy to envelop the Food and Agriculture Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bart's Books in Ojai is a bookstore that believes in doing business on the honor system. When the store is closed, customers may still buy books from a dozen four-shelf bookcases mounted on outside walls. The honor system is in effect all day on Mondays and every night of the week from the time the store closes at 5:30 p.m. until it reopens the next day at 10 a.m. And very few of the bookstore's customers ever abuse their privileges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2009 | Dan Weikel
Some Los Angeles subway riders are about to lose their ability to simply hop aboard without buying a ticket. The county Metropolitan Transportation Authority is taking steps this month to erase its distinction as the only major transit agency in the United States that doesn't equip its stations with turnstiles and security barriers. For decades, the MTA has used a gate-free honor system in which passengers walk unimpeded to train platforms without verifying that they have a ticket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2008 | Steve Hymon
In an effort to stop fare beating, the board of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority voted Thursday to install turnstiles at subway stops and some light rail stations. MTA trains operate on an honor system in which passengers are required to buy tickets but only have to show them if asked. Agency officials estimate that about 5% of all passengers aren't buying tickets and that the new gates could save the MTA as much as $7 million a year. The gating system will be installed over the next two years.
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