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Honorariums

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NEWS
May 17, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) received $29,846 and Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) collected $21,300 in speaking fees from special-interest groups last year, according to their annual financial disclosure reports made public Monday. Wilson's honorariums more than compensated for the $10,100 government pay raise that he has refused to accept for the past two years. Cranston has announced that he will not accept honorariums in the future, but Wilson has indicated that he will continue to accept them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy and Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - State lawmakers won't have to give up free Lakers tickets, Californians won't be able to bet on Dodgers games and Olympic medalists will probably not get tax breaks, after legislators shelved dozens of bills Thursday. Lawmakers also deep-sixed two proposals to regulate the controversial oil-extraction method known as fracking. The casualties included a measure by Sen. Sam Blakeslee (R-San Luis Obispo) that would have prohibited groups lobbying the Legislature from providing lawmakers with free sports and concert tickets, spa treatments, golf games and other gifts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
California House members Monday reported collecting large amounts of honorariums and free trips from special interest groups in 1988, with House Majority Whip Tony Coelho (D-Merced) leading the pack at $90,100 in appearance fees. Along with Coelho, who reported the third-highest total of all 435 House members, three other Californians were also in the top 10. They were Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) at $71,750, Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento) with $53,500 and Vic Fazio (D-Sacramento)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - When sprinter Allyson Felix returns home to Southern California with her Olympic gold medal, she may have to share her good fortune with her government. The $25,000 honorarium that gold medalists receive from the U.S. Olympic Committee is subject to both federal and state taxes, as is the $15,000 for silver medalists and the $10,000 for bronze winners. Now a bipartisan group of state lawmakers wants to help Felix and more than 30 other California medalists by exempting the honorariums and the value of their medals from state taxes.
NEWS
September 12, 1988 | Richard C. Paddock and Glenn F. Bunting, Times Staff Writers
Four legislators who are prominent targets of the FBI's investigation into political corruption have received thousands of dollars in personal income from businesses seeking to influence the course of legislation in the state Capitol, public records show. The four lawmakers, who all are in a position to help decide the fate of certain bills, reported receiving a total of $161,474 in honorariums from special-interest groups during 1986 and 1987.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN and SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writers
California House members Monday reported collecting large amounts of honorariums and free trips from special interest groups in 1988, with House Majority Whip Tony Coelho (D-Merced) leading the pack at $90,100 in appearance fees. Along with Coelho, who reported the third-highest total of all 435 House members, three other Californians were also in the top 10. They were Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) at $71,750, Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento) with $53,500 and Vic Fazio (D-Sacramento)
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The presidential commission that sets top federal salaries will recommend a ban on members of Congress accepting honorariums from special interest groups, according to a draft report made public Tuesday. To help compensate for the loss of extra income, the Commission on Executive, Legislative and Judicial Salaries, which must submit its final report to President Reagan by Dec. 15, is also expected to recommend a substantial increase in the congressional salary, currently $89,500 a year.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Antonin Scalia is known for firing verbal shots at his Supreme Court colleagues. Now, he's found a new and equally appealing target: a legal reporter who writes about the business of the high court. Two weeks ago, Tony Mauro, a reporter for the weekly Legal Times, wrote about a move in Congress to lift a ban that prevents judges from accepting honorariums, including payments for giving speeches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Stumping for George Bush last year cost Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) a chunk of change in lost speaking fees, but it earned the conservative Garden Grove Republican an honorary law degree and a free trip to London, according to 1988 federal financial disclosure reports released here Monday. Dornan's filing states that he received speaking fees of $10,000 in 1988, down from his usual annual total of $15,000 to $20,000. Brian Bennett, Dornan's chief of staff,attributed the drop to the amount of time Dornan spent canvassing the country for the Bush campaign.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, the Senate Wednesday night voted itself a raise in pay to $125,100 a year, the same level as that enjoyed by members of the House. The $23,200 yearly increase, however, will mean that much-criticized speaking fees from special interest groups will be banned. As part of the package, the Senate also imposed a ceiling of $18,675 a year on outside earned income. The vote was 53 to 45. California's senators split on the issue.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Antonin Scalia is known for firing verbal shots at his Supreme Court colleagues. Now, he's found a new and equally appealing target: a legal reporter who writes about the business of the high court. Two weeks ago, Tony Mauro, a reporter for the weekly Legal Times, wrote about a move in Congress to lift a ban that prevents judges from accepting honorariums, including payments for giving speeches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The multimillionaire mayor of Los Angeles on Wednesday accused his millionaire challenger, state Sen. Tom Hayden (D-Los Angeles), of "lining his pockets" with gifts and honorariums from special interests. "Every day must be like Christmas" for Hayden, the campaign to reelect Mayor Richard Riordan said in a news release, calling on Hayden to return $2,150 he was paid in the 1980s for speeches at California colleges and universities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1995 | TIM MAY
The theater production class at Pacoima Middle School has been asked to perform at city-sponsored programs to commemorate the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. After viewing a video of a performance by the class, the Martin Luther King Legacy Assn. awarded the school a $500 honorarium to appear at an awards ceremony Downtown on Saturday. Then on Tuesday the students will return Downtown to repeat their performance before the Los Angeles City Council.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal prosecutor on Wednesday pressed state Sen. Frank Hill (R-Whittier) to explain why he was paid $2,500 for an informal hourlong session with an FBI undercover agent. Hill, on trial for alleged corruption, acknowledged that the 1988 honorarium was for the time he spent in the undercover agent's hotel suite bantering about hunting, air shows and sports. "Two thousand, five hundred an hour?" Assistant U.S. Atty. John Vincent asked.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A number of fundamental accounting lapses allowed a UC Santa Cruz administrative assistant to embezzle more than $425,000 over four years by ordering and endorsing phony speaking honorariums, according to an audit presented Thursday to University of California regents. Mary Nicholls, 53, an employee of the campus' student services office, pleaded no contest in February and was convicted on 13 counts of grand theft, said Santa Cruz County Assistant Dist. Atty. Gary Brayton.
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
ROAMING THE RIM: On a jaunt to the Pacific Rim, former Vice President Dan Quayle spiffed up his foreign policy credentials for a possible presidential run--and hustled up contacts for his new business: advising currency traders. Quayle met with government and business leaders in Japan, China and Taiwan, whose taxpayers picked up all the expenses.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | From the Washington Post
A bipartisan House task force has decided to recommend a pay increase of up to 35% over the next two years, coupled with a phase-out of speech honorariums, and it will present the tentative plan to Democratic and Republican leaders this week, informed sources said Tuesday.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department asked a federal appeals court to reinstate a ban on federal workers collecting fees for speaking or writing outside their jobs. The ban on honorariums, imposed by Congress in 1990 when lawmakers voted themselves a $27,000-a-year pay raise, was struck down last March as an unconstitutional infringement on the speech freedoms of federal workers. The three-judge panel of the U.S.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department asked a federal appeals court to reinstate a ban on federal workers collecting fees for speaking or writing outside their jobs. The ban on honorariums, imposed by Congress in 1990 when lawmakers voted themselves a $27,000-a-year pay raise, was struck down last March as an unconstitutional infringement on the speech freedoms of federal workers. The three-judge panel of the U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | From Associated Press
An appeals court Tuesday struck down a ban on speaking fees that Congress imposed on federal workers, saying it was an unconstitutional infringement on free speech. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia called the total prohibition on outside fees for occasional speeches or magazine articles "unduly overinclusive" when applied to career civil service workers who speak or write about topics unrelated to their jobs.
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