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Honorariums

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Wall Street investment firm gave Orange County Supervisor Don R. Roth $2,500 to pay for a weekend trip to New York with his wife in 1987, four months after Roth voted to give the firm a major role in the county's multimillion-dollar jail financing plans, interviews and documents show. After the trip, Roth said in a state-mandated filing that he had received the money from the firm, the First Boston Corp., in the form of an honorarium for giving a "speech at First Boston seminar."
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NEWS
June 13, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 59 senators pocketed appearance fees from special interest groups during 1991, the last year they were permitted to accept honorariums, according to financial disclosure documents made public Friday. While the amount of honorariums accepted by senators declined sharply over previous years, there appeared to be little--if any--drop-off in the number of junkets that senators took at the expense of special interest groups. Sen. Frank H.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite growing criticism of congressional perks and a newly imposed ban on honorariums, many House members made no effort to scale back on trips to posh resorts and exotic foreign destinations at the expense of special interests in 1991, according to financial disclosure documents made public Thursday. In addition to the usual all-expenses-paid junkets to such warm-weather havens as Boca Raton, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles), a national leader on health care, was paid $21,250 in honorariums last year by such groups as the American Hospital Assn. and the American Pharmaceutical Assn. He also took six expense-paid trips, including two to Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Los Angeles painter Hans Burkhardt is a classic American-immigrant success story. Born in Basel, Switzerland, orphaned at 6, he had a childhood that makes "Oliver Twist" sound like a picnic. Always hungry in a nasty city orphanage, he worked at menial jobs from dawn to dusk earning miserly wages he never received. Wednesday he will be honored in New York with the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters' Jimmy Ernst Award.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Former Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev toured Ronald Reagan's mountain ranch Sunday and marveled that his onetime Cold War foe has a personal gasoline pump while fuel is in short supply in his own country. Reagan, Gorbachev and their wives spent the day chatting about travels, horses and real estate prices and posing for photographers.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | Associated Press
A federal judge struck down part of a sweeping ethics law Thursday, saying it unconstitutionally barred federal workers from accepting payment for outside speeches and articles. But he left intact other provisions that restrict honorariums for members of Congress. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson agreed that the section of law aimed at executive branch employees violated their First Amendment right to free speech.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Alabama Ethics Commission recommended that state Atty. Gen. Jimmy Evans prosecute Gov. Guy Hunt for using state airplanes to fly to church appearances where he accepted cash offerings. The commission voted 4 to 0, with one member absent. Hunt, a Primitive Baptist preacher, said he was innocent of any violations and would appeal to a circuit judge, an option mentioned in state ethics law.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Senate gave final congressional approval Friday to a $23,200 pay raise for itself. President Bush was expected to sign the measure. The increase was approved on a voice vote as part of a $2.3-billion spending bill for the legislative branch of government. The House approved the bill on Wednesday. Sens. Harry Reid (D-Nev.), Wyche Fowler Jr. (D-Ga.), Brock Adams (D-Wash.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) asked to be recorded as voting "no" on the bill. All are up for reelection next year.
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