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Honus Wagner

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SPORTS
April 6, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
A 1909 Honus Wagner baseball trading card was sold Saturday for a record $2.1 million in a public online sale, according to Goldin Auctions, which did not identify who purchased the rarest of collectibles. The New Jersey-based company closed bidding on the T206 card of the Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop early Saturday. The sales price eclipsed the $1.62 million the same card fetched in 2008. The record price for a trading card is $2.8 million in a private sale in 2007. The card is graded as an Excellent 5 by Professional Sports Authenticator and is exceptionally rare because it's part of a jumbo series that is larger than the normal trading card.
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TRAVEL
February 28, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. - I go to sleep each night watched over by a portrait of Roberto Clemente. I wake up each morning and see a baseball signed by Sandy Koufax. In between, I can glimpse Los Angeles, Washington and Cleveland baseball caps hanging from the mirror in the guest room. I don't live in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. It just sometimes feels as though I do. The home-field artifacts that make up part of our oddball d├ęcor - which I allow and he adores - are bush league when viewed through the prism of the real hall.
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SPORTS
June 3, 1990 | JOE HAMELIN, MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE
Sportswriters don't appear to have changed much since the turn of the century. We are still putting our feet in our mouths, often two at a time, and letting our biases slither into our scribblings. Society as a whole appears to have done a bit better, though. At least umpires no longer court death when they make a tough call. What brings these things home is "The Unforgettable Season," a new Simon & Schuster book by G.H.
SPORTS
April 6, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
A 1909 Honus Wagner baseball trading card was sold Saturday for a record $2.1 million in a public online sale, according to Goldin Auctions, which did not identify who purchased the rarest of collectibles. The New Jersey-based company closed bidding on the T206 card of the Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop early Saturday. The sales price eclipsed the $1.62 million the same card fetched in 2008. The record price for a trading card is $2.8 million in a private sale in 2007. The card is graded as an Excellent 5 by Professional Sports Authenticator and is exceptionally rare because it's part of a jumbo series that is larger than the normal trading card.
SPORTS
September 22, 1996 | Associated Press
A 1910 Honus Wagner baseball card, considered the Holy Grail of baseball collectibles, sold at auction Saturday for $640,500 and left its lucky ex-owner looking forward to early retirement. "This is the pinnacle of my life, so far," said the seller, Patricia Gibbs, 41, who won custody of the card in February as part of a national contest held by Wal-Mart. The winning bidder was not identified by officials at Christie's auction house.
SPORTS
February 28, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Call it the first home run of 2007. Brian Seigel knocked one out of the park Tuesday by selling the world's most famous baseball card for a record $2.35 million -- nearly doubling the price he paid for it six years ago. The sale of the 1909 Honus Wagner card to an unnamed Orange County businessman was revealed in a ceremony at Dodger Stadium. Its buyer, however, remained a mystery. Seigel didn't even have to make a pitch to sell the mint-condition slice of baseball history.
SPORTS
July 7, 1991 | VAN NIGHTINGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the sports memorabilia collector, it is the ultimate, the Grail, the Mona Lisa, the best there ever was, the best there ever will be. It is a piece of layered cardboard, 1 1/2 inches wide by 2 1/2 inches deep, with printing on the back, a picture on the front and no intrinsic value. "It" is a portrait of Honus Wagner, a premium given away with eight brands of cigarettes in 1909.
SPORTS
June 18, 1990 | Associated Press
The Pittsburgh Pirates are unhappy about changes in Hall of Famer Honus Wagner's batting statistics that dropped him from sixth to seventh on the career hit list and from 26th to 29th in all-time averages. Wagner, who played for the Pirates from 1900 to 1917, is listed in the eighth and latest edition of Macmillan's Baseball Encyclopedia with 12 fewer hits and a batting average .002 less than in previous editions. "What are they going to do, change his plaque in the Hall of Fame?"
SPORTS
March 3, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A sports memorabilia store owner in Aspen, Colo., says a thief took a 1911 Honus Wagner baseball card worth more than $200,000.
SPORTS
July 20, 1997
What six major leaguers did after their careers: 1. Carl Furillo, installed elevators. 2. Red Grange, did vaudeville tour. 3. Dan Brouthers, Polo Grounds press gate attendant. 4. Walter Johnson, elected county commissioner. 5. Honus Wagner, sergeant-at-arms, Pennsylvania State legislature. 6. Grover Alexander, in circus sideshow. Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
July 10, 2010 | By Jim Peltz
Pujols or Gehrig? Jeter or Ripken? A-Rod or Schmidt? There are baseball's All-Stars, and then there are its superlative All-Stars, players not only the best of a generation but arguably the best who ever played their positions. That rarified group could include three players coming to Angel Stadium for this year's All-Star game on Tuesday: first baseman Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals, shortstop Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees and third baseman Alex Rodriguez of the Yankees.
SPORTS
February 28, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Call it the first home run of 2007. Brian Seigel knocked one out of the park Tuesday by selling the world's most famous baseball card for a record $2.35 million -- nearly doubling the price he paid for it six years ago. The sale of the 1909 Honus Wagner card to an unnamed Orange County businessman was revealed in a ceremony at Dodger Stadium. Its buyer, however, remained a mystery. Seigel didn't even have to make a pitch to sell the mint-condition slice of baseball history.
NEWS
April 4, 2004 | John Crook, Special to The Times
A special alchemy seems to take place when actor Matthew Modine and director John Kent Harrison team for a nostalgic project. In 1997, the pair worked together on a CBS movie called "What the Deaf Man Heard," and that sweetly goofy Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation became the highest-rated movie of the 1997-98 season. Fans of "Deaf Man" are likely to cheer the latest Modine-Harrison collaboration, "The Winning Season," an uplifting baseball fantasy premiering Sunday on TNT.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brian and Lorrie Seigel were still jumping for joy over snaring the ultimate baseball card in an Internet auction when their 13-year-old tapped her mother on the shoulder. "If Dad can spend $1 million on a baseball card, why can't I have a horse?" Jessica moaned. This episode of Lifestyles of the Rich and Newly Famous, starring the Seigels of Santa Ana, came after he became the proud new owner Tuesday of what he called "the Mona Lisa of baseball cards." Seigel paid nearly $1.
SPORTS
July 18, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A baseball card depicting Pittsburgh Pirate shortstop Honus Wagner, issued in 1909, fetched $1.1 million on the eBay online auction house over the weekend. The unidentified buyer will be presented with the card during a press conference today at Edison Field. EBay officials would only confirm that the buyer is not a celebrity or public figure, but rather an "avid sports memorabilia collector."
SPORTS
December 5, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Two of baseball's giants died on this date, four years apart. First was "Shoeless Joe" Jackson, 63, who died of a heart attack at his home in Greenville, S.C., in 1951. Honus Wagner, who was in the inaugural Hall of Fame class of 1936, died in his sleep at his home in Carnegie, Pa., in 1955. He was 81. Jackson, considered by contemporaries as the greatest of all natural hitters, batted .356 in a 13-season career. He batted .408 in 1911, only to finish second to Ty Cobb, who batted .420.
SPORTS
July 18, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A baseball card depicting Pittsburgh Pirate shortstop Honus Wagner, issued in 1909, fetched $1.1 million on the eBay online auction house over the weekend. The unidentified buyer will be presented with the card during a press conference today at Edison Field. EBay officials would only confirm that the buyer is not a celebrity or public figure, but rather an "avid sports memorabilia collector."
SPORTS
July 20, 1997
What six major leaguers did after their careers: 1. Carl Furillo, installed elevators. 2. Red Grange, did vaudeville tour. 3. Dan Brouthers, Polo Grounds press gate attendant. 4. Walter Johnson, elected county commissioner. 5. Honus Wagner, sergeant-at-arms, Pennsylvania State legislature. 6. Grover Alexander, in circus sideshow. Source: World Features Syndicate
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