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Hooker Telescope

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NEWS
August 2, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
To step into the Hooker Telescope dome is to step back in time. Antique cabinets stand next to hand-riveted truss work. Black Bakelite telephones rest on ancient oak desks. Wooden lockers still bear nameplates for Edwin Hubble, Fritz Zwicky and other long-dead legends. "This is the most famous facility in the history of astronomy," said Robert Jastrow of the Mt. Wilson Institute.
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SCIENCE
September 1, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
For nearly half a century, the Mt. Wilson Observatory was not only the center of the universe for the study of space science, it taught us just how huge that universe was. At the eyepiece of the observatory's then ground-breaking 100-inch Hooker telescope astronomer Edwin Hubble made two of the most shocking scientific discoveries of the 20th century: The universe was far larger than anyone imagined and it was expanding. Those discoveries knocked man from his cherished place at the seat of creation to the status of a middling creature scuttling across the surface of an obscure planet among trillions of stars.
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NEWS
July 5, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Astronomer Sallie Baluinas pauses on the platform of the 80-year-old Hooker Telescope atop Mt. Wilson to touch the bentwood chair where Edwin Hubble sat, night after freezing night, in coat and tie, watching the horizons of the universe expand. Hubble forever altered Earth's place in the cosmos when he discovered in the 1920s that the Milky Way is not alone in the cosmos, but merely one among billions of galaxies, all sparkling with billions of stars.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Astronomer Sallie Baluinas pauses on the platform of the 80-year-old Hooker Telescope atop Mt. Wilson to touch the bentwood chair where Edwin Hubble sat, night after freezing night, in coat and tie, watching the horizons of the universe expand. Hubble forever altered Earth's place in the cosmos when he discovered in the 1920s that the Milky Way is not alone in the cosmos, but merely one among billions of galaxies, all sparkling with billions of stars.
SCIENCE
September 1, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
For nearly half a century, the Mt. Wilson Observatory was not only the center of the universe for the study of space science, it taught us just how huge that universe was. At the eyepiece of the observatory's then ground-breaking 100-inch Hooker telescope astronomer Edwin Hubble made two of the most shocking scientific discoveries of the 20th century: The universe was far larger than anyone imagined and it was expanding. Those discoveries knocked man from his cherished place at the seat of creation to the status of a middling creature scuttling across the surface of an obscure planet among trillions of stars.
NEWS
July 7, 1985
The county Board of Supervisors is looking into the possibility of buying the Mt. Wilson Observatory in order to preserve the mountaintop landmark 10 miles northeast of Pasadena. On a motion Tuesday by Supervisor Pete Schabarum, the board voted to instruct its Department of Parks and Recreation to meet with Mt. Wilson officials to discuss the feasibility of taking over the financially troubled facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1995
Robert A. Jones' Essay (Oct. 18) on Edwin Hubble's discoveries at Mt. Wilson criticizes Los Angeles for abandoning the observatory's "lonely, dusty telescopes." Far from abandoning Mt. Wilson, private citizens and foundations in Los Angeles have been most generous in upgrading the observatory with pioneering research tools. The 100-inch Hooker telescope has just been computerized and outfitted with high-technology "eyeglasses" which remove the blurring in astronomical images caused by Earth's atmosphere.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 1997 | PATT MORRISON
The deepest-freeze years of the Cold War were not a good time for America's Youth--as we were collectively known--to look about us and think hopefully of the future of humankind. For that, we had to look upward, into the night sky, to the stars, where new incarnations of iron men in wooden ships rode steel and fire into the stratosphere, bearing the banner of the wonder and rigor of science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After decades of decline fueled in part by city lights growing ever brighter, the Mt. Wilson Observatory was lauded Saturday for re-emerging at the forefront of astronomical research. Several universities have chosen the site in the San Gabriel Mountains as a place to build more powerful telescopes despite its proximity to Los Angeles. "We are now getting the sharpest telescope images ever obtained in the history of astronomy," Robert Jastrow, director of the Mt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Corina Knoll and Hector Becerra
If flames were to reach the top of Mt. Wilson, home to the region's TV and FM radio transmitters, what would happen? Severe damage could disrupt cellphone service, as well as television and radio programming for those who receive signals over the air. It also could interrupt some emergency law enforcement communications. But Los Angeles police and fire departments do not use the tower, and neither does the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Mt. Wilson is home to more than two dozen towers that occupy its peak just north of Sierra Madre.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
To step into the Hooker Telescope dome is to step back in time. Antique cabinets stand next to hand-riveted truss work. Black Bakelite telephones rest on ancient oak desks. Wooden lockers still bear nameplates for Edwin Hubble, Fritz Zwicky and other long-dead legends. "This is the most famous facility in the history of astronomy," said Robert Jastrow of the Mt. Wilson Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2008 | Pauline OConnor
LOTS OF towns like to compare themselves with the fictional Mayberry, but few can justify the claim as well as Sierra Madre. Sandwiched between Arcadia and Pasadena at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains, this hamlet of about 11,000 takes great pride in its time-warp atmosphere, which has made it a popular filming location. Its quaint downtown area boasts a community playhouse as well as numerous mom-and-pop shops and sidewalk cafes, but almost no chain stores and not a single traffic light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
The 100-inch Hooker Telescope on Mt. Wilson, the dominant instrument in astronomy for 30 years, closed down Tuesday night, a victim of budgetary limitations, light pollution and obsolescence. Several efforts are under way to reopen the scope at a later date, but so far none has produced a formal proposal, according to George W. Preston, director of the Mt. Wilson Observatory.
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