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June 21, 1987 | KAREN ROEBUCK, Times Staff Writer
Roy Darby stood in the back of the auditorium, snapping his fingers to Christian music and passing out bulletins--and occasional hugs--as more than 500 people filed into Hope Chapel in Hermosa Beach. Inside, the audience stood and sang, swaying and clapping and reaching toward the ceiling as Christian singer Jamie Owens-Collins entertained before the start of an evangelical service.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Lancaster, the Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship two months ago moved into a vacant supermarket, turning it into a church facility so informal that some of the 1,500 worshipers take their coffee and muffin with them into Sunday morning services. In Reseda, the Valley Vineyard Christian Fellowship of 700 strong meets in what used to be a bowling alley, feeds about 500 needy in the area monthly, and only this week put up large signs on its nondescript facade facing Reseda Boulevard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invite the homeless to Redondo Beach? Feed and clothe them in a city park? For free? "We might as well have Hanoi Jane and Martin Sheen just bus 'em on in from downtown L.A.," City Councilman Terry Ward privately scoffed when the idea first emerged two weeks ago. But when the request--made by a church and blessed by the city's fundamentalist Christian mayor--came to a hearing Tuesday night, it was with a kinder, gentler attitude that council members turned it away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1995 | ALICIA WAGNER
At a recent rap concert in Orange, a young man with a shaved head and baggy pants hanging over his sneakers, walked cautiously up to the front of the room. Bandleader Johnny (The Jam) Rosado, a 27-year-old man with a kind face who wore sunglasses and an earring, hugged him and began to pray for him. The scene was a Private Boiz performance, a Christian rap concert of five young men who sing, dance, rap and minister to youths throughout Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Lancaster, the Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship two months ago moved into a vacant supermarket, turning it into a church facility so informal that some of the 1,500 worshipers take their coffee and muffin with them into Sunday morning services. In Reseda, the Valley Vineyard Christian Fellowship of 700 strong meets in what used to be a bowling alley, feeds about 500 needy in the area monthly, and only this week put up large signs on its nondescript facade facing Reseda Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1995 | ALICIA WAGNER
At a recent rap concert in Orange, a young man with a shaved head and baggy pants hanging over his sneakers, walked cautiously up to the front of the room. Bandleader Johnny (The Jam) Rosado, a 27-year-old man with a kind face who wore sunglasses and an earring, hugged him and began to pray for him. The scene was a Private Boiz performance, a Christian rap concert of five young men who sing, dance, rap and minister to youths throughout Southern California.
NEWS
October 26, 1999
A public memorial service for pop-jazz singer Ella Mae Morse is scheduled for 1 p.m. Thursday at Hope Chapel, 2420 Pacific Coast Highway in Hermosa Beach. Jazz pianist Gerald Wiggins, who recorded and worked with Morse, will perform. Morse, whose 1942 recording of "Cow Cow Boogie" became Capitol Records' first million-selling single, died Oct. 16 in Bullhead City, Ariz., at the age of 75.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invite the homeless to Redondo Beach? Feed and clothe them in a city park? For free? "We might as well have Hanoi Jane and Martin Sheen just bus 'em on in from downtown L.A.," City Councilman Terry Ward privately scoffed when the idea first emerged two weeks ago. But when the request--made by a church and blessed by the city's fundamentalist Christian mayor--came to a hearing Tuesday night, it was with a kinder, gentler attitude that council members turned it away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990
A proposal by former Hawthorne Mayor Guy Hocker to legalize gambling in the city generated strong opposition this week when two Hawthorne ministers urged the City Council to reject the idea. Pastor Bruce Chamberlain of Hope Chapel and the Rev. Earl Thornton of Del Aire Assembly of God Church told the council that they oppose gambling because it can lead to other problems, such as higher crime rates, lower property values, and increases in gangs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Invite the homeless to Redondo Beach? Feed and clothe them in a city park? For free? "We might as well have Hanoi Jane and Martin Sheen just bus 'em on in from downtown L.A.," City Councilman Terry Ward privately scoffed when the idea first emerged two weeks ago. But when the request--made by a church and blessed by the city's fundamentalist Christian mayor--came to a hearing Tuesday night, it was with a kinder, gentler attitude that council members turned it away.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | KAREN ROEBUCK, Times Staff Writer
Roy Darby stood in the back of the auditorium, snapping his fingers to Christian music and passing out bulletins--and occasional hugs--as more than 500 people filed into Hope Chapel in Hermosa Beach. Inside, the audience stood and sang, swaying and clapping and reaching toward the ceiling as Christian singer Jamie Owens-Collins entertained before the start of an evangelical service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989
Discussion of a controversial request to set up a program for the homeless in Redondo Beach's Dominguez Park has been delayed by the City Council until Dec. 5. Faced with a lengthy agenda, the council delayed discussion of the issue until its next meeting, even though dozens of homeless activists and neighborhood residents had come to debate the plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1997
A former graphics director at Hope Chapel in Hermosa Beach pleaded guilty Thursday to embezzling more than $500,000 from the church, the district attorney's office said. Margaret Crowley, 36, who was charged with one felony count of grand theft, surrendered in Los Angeles Superior Court on Thursday. Deputy Dist. Atty. Sandra Flannery said the thefts occurred between 1988 and 1996, when Crowley submitted check requests for made-up expenses and pocketed the money.
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