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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1994
Your editorial, "Saving the Hopi Culture" (April 14), requires clarification and correction. The Hopi culture is not in danger from Peabody Western Coal Co.'s use of water from the Black Mesa in Arizona. Rather, it appears members of the Hopi Tribe wish to have a pipeline for their future growth and economic development. Why else would they be proposing a 50,000-acre-feet-per-year pipeline when Peabody Western only uses 3,500-acre-feet per year? The facts are as stated below. Peabody Western Coal Co. extracts water from the Navajo aquifer, which lies more than 2,500-3,000 feet beneath the Black Mesa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1994
Thank you for your editorial on the plight of the Hopi tribe (April 16). To think that the Peabody Western Coal Co. continues using ground water to transport its coal when it may destroy a culture that has existed for almost a thousand years. And conservatives wonder why people still consider Big Business to be immoral! ROBERT SCHMIDT Culver City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994
The conflict currently pitting the Hopi tribe against the Peabody Western Coal Co. over the use of ground water in northern Arizona is the kind of conflict classically called, with a sigh, "a parable for our times." The sigh implies tragic inevitability. But it need not be so. At stake is an ancient way of life. And Southern Californians, for a few pennies each, could help preserve it.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | WILLIAM F. RAWSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Etta Begay walks to the nearest store, a round trip of about eight miles, nearly every day to buy ice for the two plastic picnic coolers that serve as her family's refrigerator. "If we don't have any money on a certain day, we don't have any ice," she said. "Then the food goes bad." Like hundreds of other Navajo Indian families caught up in a land dispute between their tribe and the neighboring Hopis, the Begays live without electricity or telephone.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARY TOLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A proposed land swap to settle a 110-year Navajo-Hopi territorial dispute has hit some serious snags, with ranch lands central to the deal no longer for sale and government officials deeply divided over terms of the transfer. The ranch lands in question are owned by relatives of Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, who is in charge of federal agencies overseeing American Indian affairs.
NEWS
December 31, 1992
Hopi tribal officials believe they are close to solving the 13-year-old theft of their altar pieces from the Arizona village of Mishongnovi (View, June 8). Angeline Williams is the ailing 79-year-old matriarch of the family responsible for keeping ceremonial items safe. (It is believed the items were sold on the burgeoning black market for Indian artifacts.) After her story appeared in The Times, tribal officials received more than 50 calls and a dozen letters. One call resulted in the tribe and the Williams family joining forces to hire a Los Angeles private eye to work the case.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For centuries, the Hopis made pilgrimages to the land for religious ceremonies, eagle feather gathering, herb collecting and farming. Yet only Navajo lived on the disputed high plateau country of northeast Arizona, and the tribes could never work out who had authority over the territory. Not even congressional action in 1882 solved the problem. All that changed on Wednesday when the U.S.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Navajo and Hopi tribal councils have approved a proposed settlement of the tribes' century-old land dispute, officials said Tuesday. The proposed settlement would let 150 Navajo families remain for 75 years on land previously partitioned to the Hopis. In return, the federal government would give the Hopis $15 million as well as 408,000 acres of public and private land near Flagstaff, Ariz. The dispute dates at least to 1882, when a presidential order set aside 2.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the Hopi tribe said Saturday that a federal judge's decision to give nearly 61,000 acres of disputed land to the tribe is inadequate and he vowed to appeal the ruling. Vernon Masayesva said in a press release that District Judge Earl Carroll's decision Friday is "yet another example of Navajo aggression at the expense of legitimate Hopi land claims." Attempts to reach Navajo Nation President Peterson Zah or other Navajo officials were unsuccessful.
NEWS
June 19, 1992
I am very sorry to hear of the altar pieces stolen from the Hopi ("Desperate Deadline," June 7). It is tragic that these devoted people who have very little to sustain them besides their faith have to suffer loss as a result of the greed of robbers who would take their objects of worship. It is bad enough when artifacts are taken from grave sites; but these people are living and need their altar pieces made sacred through their worship. Perhaps museums and shops should be required to return to the relevant tribes all such sacred objects, so that robbers are not tempted to steal more.
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