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Horiba Instruments Inc

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BUSINESS
September 29, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Horiba Instruments Inc., which says it's the largest maker of auto emission-control equipment in the world, bought an industrial building in the Irvine Business Complex near John Wayne Airport for its U.S. headquarters. Horiba paid $2.5 million for the 40,000-square-foot building, which sits on 2.3 acres on Armstrong Avenue. The company plans to renovate the building and move in during the spring. The seller was Parker Hannifin Corp.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Horiba Instruments Inc., which says it's the largest maker of auto emission-control equipment in the world, bought an industrial building in the Irvine Business Complex near John Wayne Airport for its U.S. headquarters. Horiba paid $2.5 million for the 40,000-square-foot building, which sits on 2.3 acres on Armstrong Avenue. The company plans to renovate the building and move in during the spring. The seller was Parker Hannifin Corp.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 1990
Horiba Instruments Inc., a manufacturer of automotive and industrial emissions analysis equipment, purchased this 40,000-square-foot building from Parker Hannifin in August, 1989. After a $1-million refurbishment, the building serves as U.S. corporate headquarters for Horiba, which is a subsidiary of Horiba Ltd. in Kyoto, Japan. Half of the U.S. subsidiary's 150 employees are based in Irvine. FACTS AND FIGURES Address:17671 Armstrong Ave.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Dallas Jamison / Los Angeles Times Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
From the modest, 15-person wholesale offices of Yanmar Diesel Engine in Anaheim, to the sleek, national manufacturing headquarters of Ricoh Electronics Inc. in Tustin, the presence of Japanese companies in Orange County is a substantial one. According to a 1987 survey conducted by the Japan Business Assn. of Southern California*, 87,483 people in California worked for Japanese companies or their subsidiaries, making the Japanese bigger employers than the top five corporations in California.
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