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WORLD
June 9, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Outgoing President Carlos Mesa and other leaders warned of an impending "civil war" as a conservative senator prepared Wednesday to assume power in this conflict-ravaged country. Hormando Vaca Diez, who could be sworn in as early as today, told reporters a "blood bath" could result if protest groups opposed his presidency. Vaca Diez, as president of the Senate, is next in line to succeed Mesa, who offered his resignation Monday.
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WORLD
June 9, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Outgoing President Carlos Mesa and other leaders warned of an impending "civil war" as a conservative senator prepared Wednesday to assume power in this conflict-ravaged country. Hormando Vaca Diez, who could be sworn in as early as today, told reporters a "blood bath" could result if protest groups opposed his presidency. Vaca Diez, as president of the Senate, is next in line to succeed Mesa, who offered his resignation Monday.
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WORLD
June 1, 2005 | From Reuters
Violent clashes between police and protesters and massive marches by indigenous groups in La Paz paralyzed the capital Tuesday, scaring lawmakers and forcing suspension of a session of Bolivia's Congress. Riot police outside Congress lobbed tear gas and fired water cannons to repel protesters, who fired sticks of dynamite with slingshots. Thousands demanding nationalization of the energy sector took over the city and blocked access to the airport.
WORLD
March 7, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Besieged Bolivian President Carlos Mesa said late Sunday that he would submit his resignation to Congress today following weeks of protests that have spread to nearly every corner of his impoverished Andean country. The announcement came in a televised speech as predominantly Aymara Indian protesters in the city of El Alto blocked roads to La Paz, the capital, while other demonstrators in central Bolivia threatened to shut down oil fields.
WORLD
March 9, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
In an ever-stranger political drama, Congress voted Tuesday to keep President Carlos Mesa in office 48 hours after he submitted his resignation, even as the country's social and political order remained tenuous. Early Tuesday, Mesa's aides said he would stay in office only if by 4 p.m. he had obtained an agreement from all the nation's political parties on the most contentious issues dividing this Andean country.
WORLD
March 8, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Mesa formally submitted his resignation to Congress on Monday but continued to rule Bolivia as political leaders debated his future and how he might still be able to restore order in this troubled Andean country. Under the Bolivian Constitution, Congress must approve the president's resignation. By Monday evening, after a day of private caucuses among the country's political parties, a number of top leaders said they would vote to keep Mesa in office.
WORLD
January 13, 2005 | Hector Tobar and Oscar Ordonez, Special to The Times
Indian groups and civic activists sealed off Bolivia's two largest cities with barricades Wednesday, demanding wide-ranging economic and social reforms from President Carlos Mesa. The challenge presented Mesa with his worst political crisis since an Indian-led uprising drove his predecessor from office and brought him to power 15 months ago.
WORLD
June 7, 2005 | Hector Tobar and Raul Penaranda, Special to The Times
President Carlos Mesa offered to resign late Monday after weeks of protest and political crisis that have seen tens of thousands of mostly Indian protesters lay siege to this capital city. A historian and former television commentator who himself was brought to power by the Indian-led uprising that forced his predecessor from office in October 2003, Mesa has been undone by the ethnic and regional conflicts slowly pulling apart this impoverished Andean nation of 9 million people.
WORLD
June 11, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Calm returned to much of Bolivia on Friday after three weeks of social upheaval as a key leftist leader called on his followers to dismantle dozens of roadblocks after the inauguration of the country's caretaker president. Eduardo Rodriguez faced serious challenges on his first full day as president after a daylong drama of protest and political intrigue Thursday that ended with his taking office just before midnight.
WORLD
June 8, 2005 | Hector Tobar and Oscar Ordonez, Special to The Times
A day after his second try at quitting as this Andean nation's president, Carlos Mesa remained in office Tuesday as opposing camps failed to agree on where they should meet to choose his replacement. Battles raged on the streets of this capital city and commerce ground to a halt. Hormando Vaca Diez, the president of the Senate, said the siege of La Paz by mostly Indian and poor farmers would make it difficult for Congress to meet here.
WORLD
June 10, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Eduardo Rodriguez, the head of Bolivia's Supreme Court, became this Andean country's president late Thursday after a day of violent protest and civil disobedience that forced a conservative senator to give up his bid to hold the office. Rodriguez will rule as a caretaker president until an election can be held to pick a new leader in this nation divided by ethnic, social and regional conflicts. A special session of Congress confirmed Rodriguez as president after Sen.
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