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Horn Hardart Co

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BUSINESS
May 19, 1987
Theodore H. Kruttschnitt of Burlingame, Calif., said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that he owns 12.7% of Horn & Hardart's shares and may seek control of the Las Vegas-based food service and mail order company "under certain circumstances." Kruttschnitt told the SEC he bought an additional 223,000 shares at prices ranging between $12.50 and $13.50 between May 7 and May 14. He now owns 1.824 million shares.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 1987
Theodore H. Kruttschnitt of Burlingame, Calif., said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that he owns 12.7% of Horn & Hardart's shares and may seek control of the Las Vegas-based food service and mail order company "under certain circumstances." Kruttschnitt told the SEC he bought an additional 223,000 shares at prices ranging between $12.50 and $13.50 between May 7 and May 14. He now owns 1.824 million shares.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 1987
Irvine-based Taco Bell has purchased seven Bojangles' restaurants in Nashville for an undisclosed sum, both companies said Friday. New York-based Horn & Hardart Co., which sold the restaurants, did not disclose the transaction's terms. A Taco Bell spokesman said the units will be operated as Taco Bell restaurants. Taco Bell, a division of Pepsico, operates 2,500 restaurants across the United States.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Horn & Hardart Co. said today it has sold its 22 Arby's fast-food franchises in South Florida to Atlanta-based Arby's Inc. for $5 million. With the sale, Horn & Hardart closed out its restaurant operations in Florida. Horn & Hardart--which made the self-serve automat famous--previously has said it is exiting the restaurant business to concentrate on a mail-order division.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2001 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the first chilled bottle of soda was dispensed from a machine in the 1930s, vending machine makers have tried to duplicate that success with food. But their efforts always seemed to fall short. Cold sandwiches from machine carousels were soggy, and the heated canned ravioli tasted like, well, canned food. Workers prefer to bring their own microwaveable meals or dash out to a fast-food restaurant or convenience store down the street.
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