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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1995
In her Film Clips article "Stephen King, Feminist?" (April 16), Elaine Dutka derides horror as a literary genre, suggesting that King could and should move on to better things--namely mainstream fiction. The fact is, horror is one of the most lasting and important of literary forms. Almost every major writer in every country throughout history has tried his or her hand at horror. In addition, the supernatural is an important element in the work of the South American magic realists, as well as in the work of African American writers such as Pulitzer Prize-winner August Wilson and Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Depending on your viewpoint, the horror film "The Quiet Ones" is either about a 1970s band of fearless experimenters (led by Jared Harris) who come face to face with paranormal evil, or about a mentally ill foster child (Olivia Cooke) held in captivity by cruel, smirking researchers in the English countryside. Mostly, though, it's a junky, unscary genre piece with a misleading title, because director and co-writer John Pogue jacks up the decibels so often to manufacture frights that you fear a punctured eardrum more than anything else.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Horror movies can often be so rote in their mercenary trajectory to scare/shock/disgust that it's unnerving sometimes to encounter any different approach. The simmering DIY oddity that is "Resolution," from co-directors Justin Benson and Aaron Scott Moorhead, does just that, offering up a strangely tense and humorous meta-narrative about two friends experiencing weird goings-on at a remote cabin. Level-headed Mike (Peter Cilella) has shown up alone and unannounced to force his paranoid, drug addict bestie Chris (Vinny Curran)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
Holding red apples, a crowd of more than 100 parents, teachers and students raised their arms high on Sunday in a salute to Mark Black, Santa Monica High School's suspended veteran science teacher and wrestling coach, and to besieged teachers everywhere. The rally in support of Black, who was put on leave 10 days ago after physically tangling with a student carrying drugs in class, was also an implicit rebuke to the school district's superintendent, who appeared to side with an unruly student, rather than a respected educator and coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
The people have spoken. And they say they want to be scared. Over the weekend, the low-budget supernatural spook film "Insidious: Chapter 2" topped the box office, scaring up $41.1 million. The film, which was directed by a seemingly unstoppable James Wan, cost $5 million to make and earned more than three times what the first "Insidious" earned when it opened in 2011. The "Insidious" story isn't a one-off, however. This year has seen nearly half a dozen similar stories when it comes to creepy little films that have scored big with audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Ten months into the moviegoing year, and many of the most lucrative surprises at the box office are cut of the horror cloth: “The Conjuring” ($137 million), “Insidious Chapter 2” ($81 million), “Mama” ($71 million). Conceived with low expectations and lower budgets, all three coasted to weekend wins and have ended up in the box office top 50. You could imagine, then, how it was easy to think "Carrie" could continue the trend last weekend -- A-list cast, big marketing spend and the added selling point that the film shares name and concept with one of the most popular horror movies of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Fans of pulpy British horror novels were dismayed to learn that James Herbert , author of books including "The Rats," "Magic Cottage" and "Haunted," had died at his home Wednesday. The 69-year-old died peacefully in his sleep, according to publisher Pan Macmillan. Herbert was an art director at an advertising agency when he began writing his first novel, "The Rats," which was published when he was 30. His most recent book, "Ash," came out in the U.S. late last year. In all, he wrote 23 novels that have been published in 34 languages, selling more than 54 million copies worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
There's plenty of blood in the supernatural horror flick "Dark House," but what really defines director Victor Salva's latest effort is flop sweat. A haunted house, psychic powers, a father-son mystery, pregnancy terror, the South's history of lynching - Salva and co-writer Charles Agron reach for pretty much any contrivance that might send a fleeting shiver down audience members' spines with too little consideration for narrative cohesion or thematic nuance. Upon his mother's death, clairvoyant Nick (Luke Kleintank)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Richard Abowitz
"Halloween has always been a weird holiday," says George Maloof, owner of the Palms casino. He does not mean weird in the sense of haunted, but more in the sense of being afraid of Las Vegas being a ghost town for the weekend. Or to put it another way: The bump you would expect from the seemingly natural match of this most unnatural place, Sin City, with a holiday dedicated to naughtiness and disguises isn't as much as you would think. Halloween in Vegas has never become an event the way New Year's weekend has. As Maloof puts it, "To be frank, Halloween hasn't always been the best holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Stephen Graham Jones may be the best prolific writer you haven't heard of yet, partly because his specialty is literary horror and partly because, despite having a specialty, he's quick to switch genres and hard to pin down. Count up his books and stories and anthologies and e-magazines and e-releases and he has been published 201 times -- but that was in early March, before his Texas noir "Not For Nothing" was published, and before the YA novel he co-wrote with Paul Tremblay, "Floating Boy and the Girl Who Couldn't Fly," came out in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | Chris Megerian and Paige St. John and Scott Gold
When they climbed on board the bus, most were strangers. Not friends, nor classmates. They were called together by aspiration: They were headed to Humboldt State University through a program designed for underprivileged students. Most would be the first in their family to go to college. They were called together, too, by fate: They were assigned to this bus because their last names began with the letters A through L. A little after 5:30 on Thursday evening, now 500 miles into the trip, their bus carrying 48 people thundered past the fertile farms that line Interstate 5. A FedEx tractor-trailer veered across a wide median and struck the bus head-on.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The earth did quake; the rocks rent, and the graves were opened. Then peace was made with God as Jesus' body came to rest. That peace, and with it the ability to notice beauty in all things, is expressed in the last aria of Bach's "St. Matthew Passion," which begins with the text, "Make thyself clean, my heart. " This aria is among the most sublime gifts given in all of music, a vision far better suited for the soul than the stage. Yet Peter Brook tailors it meticulously to "The Suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Stephen Graham Jones may be the best prolific writer you haven't heard of yet, partly because his specialty is literary horror and partly because, despite having a specialty, he's quick to switch genres and hard to pin down. Count up his books and stories and anthologies and e-magazines and e-releases and he has been published 201 times -- but that was in early March, before his Texas noir "Not For Nothing" was published, and before the YA novel he co-wrote with Paul Tremblay, "Floating Boy and the Girl Who Couldn't Fly," came out in April.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
OSO, Wash. - One of the first 911 calls after the mudslide in this small town about an hour north of Seattle came from Marla Jupp. Jupp, 63, is a retired teacher's assistant, scion of a large local family that has lived in the Oso Valley along the Stillaguamish River for generations. They're the Skaglunds, and she still lives at the bottom of Skaglund Hill on State Route 530. She was at home a week ago Saturday when she heard what sounded like a big truck rumbling by shortly before 11 a.m., "like the wind was blowing real hard, like we had big gusts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Most of "American Horror Story's" repertory company will be back for the show's fourth season later this year, but the new season, subtitled "Freak Show" will have an interesting new face: Michael Chiklis. The "Shield" star's involvement in the series was announced Friday night at the closing night of the PaleyFest TV festival, which was a tribute to the recently concluded "American Horror Story: Coven. " According to the Associated Press, Chiklis will play the ex-husband of Kathy Bates' character, who will be back next season after making her "AHS" debut in "Coven.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Ryan Murphy loves to play guessing games with his audience when it comes to where new seasons of the anthology series "American Horror Story" will go. Previous seasons have been set in a haunted house, an insane asylum and a school for witches. And the fourth season will be set in a carnival, if one of the show's writers is to be believed. "AHS" writer Douglas Petrie was a recent guest on the "Nerdist Writers Panel" podcast and confirmed rumors that the next season's storyline would be set, at least in part, in a carnival.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Siberia" -- It may not have the built-in fan base of "Under the Dome," but NBC's "Siberia" could be just as much fun. Sixteen contestants are dropped in the middle of a Siberian forest with a camera crew and not much else. The goal: to survive long enough to claim the $500,000 prize. The pilot sets up a convincing, if a tad unregulated (there are no rules save do you what you must to survive), reality show, except that's not what's happening here. Created by newcomer Matthew Arnold, "Siberia" is a horror-drama, with creepy-woods top notes of "Blair Witch Project" and the production value of the short-lived monster mess, "The River.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Anyone traveling around Los Angeles recently has likely noticed the menacing imagery of men in paramilitary garb with their faces covered by spooky animal masks. They appeared for a time as ghostly figures overlaid on posters for other movies, though they have recently been seen more clearly in ads all their own for the new horror-thriller "You're Next. " Referred to in the credits as Lamb Mask, Tiger Mask and Fox Mask, the characters are the main villains of much of the film. They invade the reunion of a wealthy family at a remote country estate seemingly at random, charging through the windows with crossbows and machetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
There's plenty of blood in the supernatural horror flick "Dark House," but what really defines director Victor Salva's latest effort is flop sweat. A haunted house, psychic powers, a father-son mystery, pregnancy terror, the South's history of lynching - Salva and co-writer Charles Agron reach for pretty much any contrivance that might send a fleeting shiver down audience members' spines with too little consideration for narrative cohesion or thematic nuance. Upon his mother's death, clairvoyant Nick (Luke Kleintank)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Urbanites have plenty of reasons to fear country folk, at least in the movies. Getting away for the weekend so often turn into a showdown with masked murderers that heading out to the country seems like a game of Russian roulette. In writer-director Jeremy Lovering's exceptional British thriller "In Fear," the needy, nebbish Tom (Iain De Caestecker) rolls the dice by booking a room at a remote hotel for himself and his maybe-kinda girlfriend, Lucy (Alice Englert), to celebrate their two-week anniversary.
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