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May 31, 2010 | By Faye Fiore, Los Angeles Times
It's been 11 years since the makers of "The Blair Witch Project" set their horror movie out here in the middle of nowhere and changed this little town of 180 people forever. To this day, tourists occasionally wander through Burkittsville and ask, "Where's the witch?" "There isn't one," the townspeople say, fatigued. "It isn't real ." The 1999 movie shot in eight days on a shoestring budget made a mint. It got four stars from Roger Ebert and went down in Hollywood history as a cult classic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Ryan Murphy loves to play guessing games with his audience when it comes to where new seasons of the anthology series "American Horror Story" will go. Previous seasons have been set in a haunted house, an insane asylum and a school for witches. And the fourth season will be set in a carnival, if one of the show's writers is to be believed. "AHS" writer Douglas Petrie was a recent guest on the "Nerdist Writers Panel" podcast and confirmed rumors that the next season's storyline would be set, at least in part, in a carnival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1995
In her Film Clips article "Stephen King, Feminist?" (April 16), Elaine Dutka derides horror as a literary genre, suggesting that King could and should move on to better things--namely mainstream fiction. The fact is, horror is one of the most lasting and important of literary forms. Almost every major writer in every country throughout history has tried his or her hand at horror. In addition, the supernatural is an important element in the work of the South American magic realists, as well as in the work of African American writers such as Pulitzer Prize-winner August Wilson and Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
There's plenty of blood in the supernatural horror flick "Dark House," but what really defines director Victor Salva's latest effort is flop sweat. A haunted house, psychic powers, a father-son mystery, pregnancy terror, the South's history of lynching - Salva and co-writer Charles Agron reach for pretty much any contrivance that might send a fleeting shiver down audience members' spines with too little consideration for narrative cohesion or thematic nuance. Upon his mother's death, clairvoyant Nick (Luke Kleintank)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2009 | Gina McIntyre
Moviegoers, beware. A host of masked, murderous slashers, demented fiends and demonic forces are about to converge on the multiplex, but it's not your immortal soul they're after. It's your hard-earned dollars. Horror films are dominating the release schedule in 2009 -- almost certainly, event movies like "Watchmen" and "Terminator Salvation" will outgross their spookier kin, but not a month will go by without at least one film designed to terrify audiences making its way into theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
The people have spoken. And they say they want to be scared. Over the weekend, the low-budget supernatural spook film "Insidious: Chapter 2" topped the box office, scaring up $41.1 million. The film, which was directed by a seemingly unstoppable James Wan, cost $5 million to make and earned more than three times what the first "Insidious" earned when it opened in 2011. The "Insidious" story isn't a one-off, however. This year has seen nearly half a dozen similar stories when it comes to creepy little films that have scored big with audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Horror movies can often be so rote in their mercenary trajectory to scare/shock/disgust that it's unnerving sometimes to encounter any different approach. The simmering DIY oddity that is "Resolution," from co-directors Justin Benson and Aaron Scott Moorhead, does just that, offering up a strangely tense and humorous meta-narrative about two friends experiencing weird goings-on at a remote cabin. Level-headed Mike (Peter Cilella) has shown up alone and unannounced to force his paranoid, drug addict bestie Chris (Vinny Curran)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Ten months into the moviegoing year, and many of the most lucrative surprises at the box office are cut of the horror cloth: “The Conjuring” ($137 million), “Insidious Chapter 2” ($81 million), “Mama” ($71 million). Conceived with low expectations and lower budgets, all three coasted to weekend wins and have ended up in the box office top 50. You could imagine, then, how it was easy to think "Carrie" could continue the trend last weekend -- A-list cast, big marketing spend and the added selling point that the film shares name and concept with one of the most popular horror movies of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Fans of pulpy British horror novels were dismayed to learn that James Herbert , author of books including "The Rats," "Magic Cottage" and "Haunted," had died at his home Wednesday. The 69-year-old died peacefully in his sleep, according to publisher Pan Macmillan. Herbert was an art director at an advertising agency when he began writing his first novel, "The Rats," which was published when he was 30. His most recent book, "Ash," came out in the U.S. late last year. In all, he wrote 23 novels that have been published in 34 languages, selling more than 54 million copies worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Richard Abowitz
"Halloween has always been a weird holiday," says George Maloof, owner of the Palms casino. He does not mean weird in the sense of haunted, but more in the sense of being afraid of Las Vegas being a ghost town for the weekend. Or to put it another way: The bump you would expect from the seemingly natural match of this most unnatural place, Sin City, with a holiday dedicated to naughtiness and disguises isn't as much as you would think. Halloween in Vegas has never become an event the way New Year's weekend has. As Maloof puts it, "To be frank, Halloween hasn't always been the best holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Urbanites have plenty of reasons to fear country folk, at least in the movies. Getting away for the weekend so often turn into a showdown with masked murderers that heading out to the country seems like a game of Russian roulette. In writer-director Jeremy Lovering's exceptional British thriller "In Fear," the needy, nebbish Tom (Iain De Caestecker) rolls the dice by booking a room at a remote hotel for himself and his maybe-kinda girlfriend, Lucy (Alice Englert), to celebrate their two-week anniversary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
The death of Canadian tourist Elisa Lam, whose body was found in a water tank atop a Los Angeles hotel, has inspired the plot of a Hollywood horror movie. Lam, 21, was found dead  in a water tank on the roof of the Cecil Hotel on Feb. 21, 2013. Her odd behavior in the hours before her disappearance sparked fears and  conspiracy theories  about how she died. Deadline Hollywood reported that Sony Pictures Entertainment and Matt Tolmach Productions acquired rights to the screenplay “The Bringing,” speculatively written by Brandon and Phillip Murphy, which focuses on a detective's mysterious encounters as he investigates Lam's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Though it comes to Los Angeles as a two-part film, "Generation War" began its life as a three-part German TV series (originally called "Our Mothers, Our Fathers") that was a sensation in its home country. Eight years in the making, 4 hours, 39 minutes long (and needing two separate admissions during its weeklong run at Landmark's Nuart), "Generation War" attracted millions of viewers on German TV. Its story will be familiar and unfamiliar to American viewers, which is why it holds our interest even when it is not at its best.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Karin Klein
You would have thought that after 45 states leaped forward to adopt the Common Core curriculum standards for their schools, the only issue going forward would be how to make this big change happen in the smoothest and most successful way. Instead, the standards, which call for covering less academic territory but covering it more deeply, and challenging students to think about the concepts and processes rather than just follow directions, are...
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Can your cable or broadband service get any worse? That's the question that comes to mind when reading the doom-and-gloom coverage of Comcast's $45-billion purchase of Time Warner Cable. One of the most common predictions from critics: the new company will push cable and broadband prices even higher than Comcast or Time Warner Cable have been able to do separately. That's because of the leverage Comcast will gain by acquiring Time Warner Cable. The combined company would hold about 30% of the pay-TV market (and roughly half of all customers served by a cable operator)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic, This post has been updated. See note below.
There's a story former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry "Hank" Paulson tells in Joe Berlinger's unsettling new documentary, "Hank: 5 Years From the Brink," about "Goodnight Moon. " His wife, Wendy, suggested that instead of the insistent monotone we grew accustomed to in 2008 as he explained the trillion-dollar Wall Street bailout to Congress, he should read the bedtime story to his children with more emotion in his voice. When he did, they burst into tears - demanding that he read like Daddy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
There's plenty of blood in the supernatural horror flick "Dark House," but what really defines director Victor Salva's latest effort is flop sweat. A haunted house, psychic powers, a father-son mystery, pregnancy terror, the South's history of lynching - Salva and co-writer Charles Agron reach for pretty much any contrivance that might send a fleeting shiver down audience members' spines with too little consideration for narrative cohesion or thematic nuance. Upon his mother's death, clairvoyant Nick (Luke Kleintank)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Siberia" -- It may not have the built-in fan base of "Under the Dome," but NBC's "Siberia" could be just as much fun. Sixteen contestants are dropped in the middle of a Siberian forest with a camera crew and not much else. The goal: to survive long enough to claim the $500,000 prize. The pilot sets up a convincing, if a tad unregulated (there are no rules save do you what you must to survive), reality show, except that's not what's happening here. Created by newcomer Matthew Arnold, "Siberia" is a horror-drama, with creepy-woods top notes of "Blair Witch Project" and the production value of the short-lived monster mess, "The River.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Gina McIntyre
Adam Wingard's “The Guest” and Mike Flanagan's “Oculus” are among the horror films set to screen as part of the Midnighters lineup at the South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival in Austin, Texas, organizers announced Wednesday. This year, the Midnighters section will spotlight 10 genre titles. Wingard's ("You're Next") film centers on a soldier concealing dark secrets about his past who pays a visit to the family of a fallen comrade; it premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Lydia Millet
As a teenager I used to plunder my father's shelves of dog-eared paperbacks, kept in a dank, low-ceilinged basement room that also held a turntable, an out-of-tune piano and a distinct eau de mold. What excitement lurked in those browning pages with their brittle edges, whose pieces would chip off in my hands - science fiction and fantasy, mainly, with a smattering of mystery and P.G. Wodehouse and military biographies. Reading Jeff Vandermeer's novel "Annihilation" - the first in a trilogy, all to be released this year - I had the same sensation of dreadful, delicious anticipation I used to have as I cracked open one of the books in the basement.
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