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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989
I am offended by Atkinson's characterization of the music of Mel Powell. According to Atkinson, "Powell writes the sort of horribly dissonant music that should be confined to bad horror films." In my opinion, a critic who writes that sort of horribly ignorant review should himself be confined--to musical matters that will not unduly tax his meager mind and minimalist ears. DAVID RAKSIN Adjunct Professor Music and Public Administration USC
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
By 1980, John Landis had a string of successes under his belt - including "The Kentucky Fried Movie," "Animal House" and "The Blues Brothers" - but the writer-director had long been unable to get his script for "An American Werewolf in London" off the ground. Landis had written the script in 1969 as a teenager. The screenplay earned him a number of writing jobs in the ensuing years, Landis recalled this week, but "everyone, literally unanimously, had the same response, which was either 'this is too funny to be frightening' or 'this is too frightening to be funny.' And I kept saying, 'it's both.'" Finally, Universal, home to many horror classics, released the $10-million picture in 1981, and it took in more than $30 million at the domestic box office (about $86 million in today's dollars)
BUSINESS
February 19, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Billionaire Carl Icahn bought about 1.61 million shares of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., increasing his stake in Hollywood's largest independent movie studio to 12%. The purchase, reported in a regulatory filing, boosted Icahn's stake from about 11% reported on Feb. 10. Shares of Lions Gate, based in Vancouver, Canada, but run from Santa Monica, rose 29 cents, or 6.9%, to $4.48. Icahn is increasing his ownership of Lions Gate, maker of the "Saw" horror films, as the studio's parent pares movie production to reduce costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
The best horror films are actually about something larger than the grim events that typically befall their characters. It's what makes Tobe Hooper's "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" films, George Romero's "Living Dead" movies or the more recent "House of the Devil" and "Let the Right One In" so powerful: They examine societal change and the fear of the other through a distorted lens. As with far too many recent horror sequels and reboots, "Texas Chainsaw 3D," the latest off-target entry in the once radically unnerving series, has little on its mind beyond good-time gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | Susan King
Get your ghoul on this weekend with a horror lineup that includes an academy event and a graveside screening. The Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences ushers in the Halloween weekend tonight at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater with its "The Sound Behind the Image III: Real Horrorshow!" event hosted by Oscar-winning sound editor David E. Stone. The evening will trace the evolution of sound in horror films from the silent era (1925's "The Phantom of the Opera " ) to today's digital age (2008's "Cloverfield" )
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
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