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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Anne Gwynne, leading lady in scores of sci-fi and horror films including the 1940 serial ''Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe'' and ''Black Friday'' with Boris Karloff, has died. She was 84. Gwynne died March 31 of a stroke following surgery at the Motion Picture County Hospital in Woodland Hills, her family said. Born Marguerite Gwynne Trice in Waco, Texas, she studied drama at Stephens College in Missouri and moved to Los Angeles with her family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
"Girls" creator Lena Dunham, horror producer Jason Blum and YouTube sensation Casey Niestat will deliver keynote addresses at the 2014 South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival, SXSW announced Tuesday. Next year will be the first that the Austin, Texas, film festival is programming keynote addresses, modeled on those at its sister festival, SXSW Interactive. Each of the keynote speakers fits into one of the distinctive niches at SXSW, which is known for its horror films, comedies and low-budget offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Carla Laemmle lived a fairy tale existence after she and her parents moved to the Universal Studios lot in 1921 when she was 11. Her father, Joseph, was the brother of Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle and when Joseph's health began to fail, Carl invited the family to leave Chicago and live on the lot because the climate would be better in California. "There were two houses with a long front lawn and a little hospital," recalled Carla Laemmle, who is celebrating her 103rd birthday Saturday with a party at the Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986
Who cares if Clarke and his fanzine are boycotted by LucasBerg? Who cares if Clarke is yet another "sci-fi" expert who detests the term sci-fi? I mean, where was Calendar when Famous Monsters, the magazine that started it all back in '58, was the lone voice in the media, giving millions of fans and scholars alike virtually their only glimpse of fantasy and horror films? Why has Forrest J. Ackerman, FM's esteemed creator and editor for a quarter of a century, never merited a Calendar cover story?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The films "The Innkeepers," written and directed by Ti West, and "Kill List," directed and co-written by Ben Wheatley, are idiosyncratic takes on the notion of the horror film, made by filmmakers who tell their stories with a mix of suspenseful invention and wicked irreverence. Both open in Los Angeles on Friday and are already available via video-on-demand platforms. And both belong to a new wave of movies emerging from the festival circuit that appeal to both the art-house/cinephile set and hard-core horror fans.
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