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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
When the director of "Texas Chainsaw 3D" told studio executives at Lionsgate that he wanted to cast R&B singer Trey Songz as his young leading man, they balked. "People at Lionsgate were uncertain, saying, 'We've never heard of him. We don't know who he is,'" said John Luessenhop, the filmmaker behind the horror sequel. So Tim Palen, the studio's chief marketing officer, Googled Songz, and found he was a two-time Grammy nominee with 5.6 million followers on Twitter and 14 million fans who "like" his Facebook page.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Carla Laemmle lived a fairy tale existence after she and her parents moved to the Universal Studios lot in 1921 when she was 11. Her father, Joseph, was the brother of Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle and when Joseph's health began to fail, Carl invited the family to leave Chicago and live on the lot because the climate would be better in California. "There were two houses with a long front lawn and a little hospital," recalled Carla Laemmle, who is celebrating her 103rd birthday Saturday with a party at the Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986
Who cares if Clarke and his fanzine are boycotted by LucasBerg? Who cares if Clarke is yet another "sci-fi" expert who detests the term sci-fi? I mean, where was Calendar when Famous Monsters, the magazine that started it all back in '58, was the lone voice in the media, giving millions of fans and scholars alike virtually their only glimpse of fantasy and horror films? Why has Forrest J. Ackerman, FM's esteemed creator and editor for a quarter of a century, never merited a Calendar cover story?
BUSINESS
September 19, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Call it fright on demand. Lions Gate Entertainment, Sony Pictures Television and Comcast Corp. plan to launch a video channel on Halloween devoted entirely to horror programs. The new channel, called Fearnet, is to be available on cable as video on demand. It also is to be available on the Internet and through wireless systems. The channel's target audience is men and boys from 14 to 29 years old.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
"Girls" creator Lena Dunham, horror producer Jason Blum and YouTube sensation Casey Niestat will deliver keynote addresses at the 2014 South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival, SXSW announced Tuesday. Next year will be the first that the Austin, Texas, film festival is programming keynote addresses, modeled on those at its sister festival, SXSW Interactive. Each of the keynote speakers fits into one of the distinctive niches at SXSW, which is known for its horror films, comedies and low-budget offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
When actress-director-producer Penny Marshall was a child, she wanted nothing more than to go outside and play with the neighborhood kids. A tomboy, she envisioned becoming an athlete one day. Her mother had something else in mind. With a dance school in the cellar of her Bronx apartment building, Marjorie Marshall tried to fashion young Penny into a tap dancer. It didn't take. What did stick was a little of the craziness and humor that filled their household, which included big brother, and now filmmaker, Garry Marshall ("Pretty Woman")
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