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BUSINESS
February 19, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Billionaire Carl Icahn bought about 1.61 million shares of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., increasing his stake in Hollywood's largest independent movie studio to 12%. The purchase, reported in a regulatory filing, boosted Icahn's stake from about 11% reported on Feb. 10. Shares of Lions Gate, based in Vancouver, Canada, but run from Santa Monica, rose 29 cents, or 6.9%, to $4.48. Icahn is increasing his ownership of Lions Gate, maker of the "Saw" horror films, as the studio's parent pares movie production to reduce costs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
"Girls" creator Lena Dunham, horror producer Jason Blum and YouTube sensation Casey Niestat will deliver keynote addresses at the 2014 South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival, SXSW announced Tuesday. Next year will be the first that the Austin, Texas, film festival is programming keynote addresses, modeled on those at its sister festival, SXSW Interactive. Each of the keynote speakers fits into one of the distinctive niches at SXSW, which is known for its horror films, comedies and low-budget offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"WHAT, are you gonna stop me?" That was Max Rosenberg's retort after being asked if the management of the building had given him permission to smoke mini-cigars in his cluttered fourth-floor office during broad daylight. "They don't say anything. They're afraid of me," he explains. You better believe it. After 60 years in the movie game, first as an art-movie distributor, then as a producer of such B-movie horror classics as "Tales From the Crypt" and "Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Gina McIntyre
Adam Wingard's “The Guest” and Mike Flanagan's “Oculus” are among the horror films set to screen as part of the Midnighters lineup at the South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival in Austin, Texas, organizers announced Wednesday. This year, the Midnighters section will spotlight 10 genre titles. Wingard's ("You're Next") film centers on a soldier concealing dark secrets about his past who pays a visit to the family of a fallen comrade; it premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | Susan King
Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa has made an international reputation over the last decade for his J-horror films, including the 1997 serial-killer thriller "Cure" and the 2001 ghosts-invading-the-Internet chiller "Pulse." But with his latest film, "Tokyo Sonata," Kurosawa moves outside the horror genre and into the realm of family drama. Still, "there hasn't been a big internal change on how I think about things.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
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