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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"WHAT, are you gonna stop me?" That was Max Rosenberg's retort after being asked if the management of the building had given him permission to smoke mini-cigars in his cluttered fourth-floor office during broad daylight. "They don't say anything. They're afraid of me," he explains. You better believe it. After 60 years in the movie game, first as an art-movie distributor, then as a producer of such B-movie horror classics as "Tales From the Crypt" and "Dr.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
"How you doin', baby?" Marlon Wayans said, leaning down to kiss a doll on the lips. The toy, a prop from Wayans' latest movie, "A Haunted House 2," was propped up in a chair across the table from the actor at a stuffy Beverly Hills restaurant. The doll, named Abigail, was meant to resemble a creepy figurine from 2013's "The Conjuring": Both shared the same dead green eyes, sooty peasant dress and pigtail braids. Wayans, 41, has long been known for his outrageous comic taste. He dressed as a Caucasian female FBI agent in "White Chicks" and has been poking fun at the horror genre for years, launching the hit "Scary Movie" parody franchise in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
When actress-director-producer Penny Marshall was a child, she wanted nothing more than to go outside and play with the neighborhood kids. A tomboy, she envisioned becoming an athlete one day. Her mother had something else in mind. With a dance school in the cellar of her Bronx apartment building, Marjorie Marshall tried to fashion young Penny into a tap dancer. It didn't take. What did stick was a little of the craziness and humor that filled their household, which included big brother, and now filmmaker, Garry Marshall ("Pretty Woman")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Carla Laemmle lived a fairy tale existence after she and her parents moved to the Universal Studios lot in 1921 when she was 11. Her father, Joseph, was the brother of Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle and when Joseph's health began to fail, Carl invited the family to leave Chicago and live on the lot because the climate would be better in California. "There were two houses with a long front lawn and a little hospital," recalled Carla Laemmle, who is celebrating her 103rd birthday Saturday with a party at the Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | Susan King
Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa has made an international reputation over the last decade for his J-horror films, including the 1997 serial-killer thriller "Cure" and the 2001 ghosts-invading-the-Internet chiller "Pulse." But with his latest film, "Tokyo Sonata," Kurosawa moves outside the horror genre and into the realm of family drama. Still, "there hasn't been a big internal change on how I think about things.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
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