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Horror Films

ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Tim Burton, cinematic champion of weirdos, outsiders and overlooked geniuses, has long been stitching together broken psyches. Over the years he's taken detours for big-budget reprises such as "Alice in Wonderland," "Sweeney Todd" and "Planet of the Apes," some a better fit than others. In contrast, "Frankenweenie," his new animated riff on horror classics about a boy with a scientific bent resurrecting his pet dog, feels very much a return to form. Actually it's more like the filmmaker has come home, kicked up his feet and done exactly as he wants in this love letter to the original "Frankenstein" - cue thunder and lightning.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Billionaire Carl Icahn bought about 1.61 million shares of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., increasing his stake in Hollywood's largest independent movie studio to 12%. The purchase, reported in a regulatory filing, boosted Icahn's stake from about 11% reported on Feb. 10. Shares of Lions Gate, based in Vancouver, Canada, but run from Santa Monica, rose 29 cents, or 6.9%, to $4.48. Icahn is increasing his ownership of Lions Gate, maker of the "Saw" horror films, as the studio's parent pares movie production to reduce costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
The best horror films are actually about something larger than the grim events that typically befall their characters. It's what makes Tobe Hooper's "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" films, George Romero's "Living Dead" movies or the more recent "House of the Devil" and "Let the Right One In" so powerful: They examine societal change and the fear of the other through a distorted lens. As with far too many recent horror sequels and reboots, "Texas Chainsaw 3D," the latest off-target entry in the once radically unnerving series, has little on its mind beyond good-time gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2005 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
As America's preeminent zombie auteur, George Romero is no stranger to death in its various guises. The writer-director responsible for the groundbreaking "Night of the Living Dead" (1968) and "Dawn of the Dead" (1978) shook up the horror genre, making low-budget popcorn movies with a recurrent plotline: The deceased return en masse from the grave, the living fight them, havoc ensues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Anne Gwynne, leading lady in scores of sci-fi and horror films including the 1940 serial ''Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe'' and ''Black Friday'' with Boris Karloff, has died. She was 84. Gwynne died March 31 of a stroke following surgery at the Motion Picture County Hospital in Woodland Hills, her family said. Born Marguerite Gwynne Trice in Waco, Texas, she studied drama at Stephens College in Missouri and moved to Los Angeles with her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
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