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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | Susan King
Julie Adams nearly turned down the role that has made her a legend among sci-fi and horror films fans: Kay Lawrence in 1954's "Creature From the Black Lagoon. " But who could blame her? As a contract player at Universal six decades ago, she had played opposite Arthur Kennedy in 1951's "Bright Victory," Jimmy Stewart in the 1952 western "Bend of the River" and heartthrob Tyrone Power in 1953's "Mississippi Gambler. " And now the studio wanted her for a black-and-white 3-D horror film that was sort of a fishy version of "Beauty and the Beast.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Billionaire Carl Icahn bought about 1.61 million shares of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., increasing his stake in Hollywood's largest independent movie studio to 12%. The purchase, reported in a regulatory filing, boosted Icahn's stake from about 11% reported on Feb. 10. Shares of Lions Gate, based in Vancouver, Canada, but run from Santa Monica, rose 29 cents, or 6.9%, to $4.48. Icahn is increasing his ownership of Lions Gate, maker of the "Saw" horror films, as the studio's parent pares movie production to reduce costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen and Nicole Sperling
A spaceship-like, 1,000-seat theater may be the most striking feature of the Motion Picture Academy's planned film museum at LACMA, but the organization has also revealed a bevy of other details about what the six-story, 290,000-square-foot facility opening in 2017, will include. Some highlights: Ground Floor: This will consist of a public piazza, the museum lobby, a cafe and a gift store. The piazza will connect the film museum to the rest of the LACMA campus. The academy says "a majestic red carpet and Cannes-style grand staircase" will take visitors into the soaring 1,000-seat, domed "premiere theater," to be named for David Geffen, who has pledged $25 million to the $300-million museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Anne Gwynne, leading lady in scores of sci-fi and horror films including the 1940 serial ''Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe'' and ''Black Friday'' with Boris Karloff, has died. She was 84. Gwynne died March 31 of a stroke following surgery at the Motion Picture County Hospital in Woodland Hills, her family said. Born Marguerite Gwynne Trice in Waco, Texas, she studied drama at Stephens College in Missouri and moved to Los Angeles with her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986
Who cares if Clarke and his fanzine are boycotted by LucasBerg? Who cares if Clarke is yet another "sci-fi" expert who detests the term sci-fi? I mean, where was Calendar when Famous Monsters, the magazine that started it all back in '58, was the lone voice in the media, giving millions of fans and scholars alike virtually their only glimpse of fantasy and horror films? Why has Forrest J. Ackerman, FM's esteemed creator and editor for a quarter of a century, never merited a Calendar cover story?
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