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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989 | Marc Shapiro
Ozzy Osbourne hosting horror films? Cannon Home Video has hired the heavy metal madman to perform two-minute introductions to each of eight horror films. The first four--"Dracula's Last Rights," "Crucible of Horror," "Beast in the Cellar" and "Blood on Satan's Cloth"--are due on video shelves April 26. Kristina Hamm, assistant to the director of Cannon Home Video, told us Osbourne will provide a plot summary and "tell a couple of jokes."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
"How you doin', baby?" Marlon Wayans said, leaning down to kiss a doll on the lips. The toy, a prop from Wayans' latest movie, "A Haunted House 2," was propped up in a chair across the table from the actor at a stuffy Beverly Hills restaurant. The doll, named Abigail, was meant to resemble a creepy figurine from 2013's "The Conjuring": Both shared the same dead green eyes, sooty peasant dress and pigtail braids. Wayans, 41, has long been known for his outrageous comic taste. He dressed as a Caucasian female FBI agent in "White Chicks" and has been poking fun at the horror genre for years, launching the hit "Scary Movie" parody franchise in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | Susan King
Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa has made an international reputation over the last decade for his J-horror films, including the 1997 serial-killer thriller "Cure" and the 2001 ghosts-invading-the-Internet chiller "Pulse." But with his latest film, "Tokyo Sonata," Kurosawa moves outside the horror genre and into the realm of family drama. Still, "there hasn't been a big internal change on how I think about things.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Anne Gwynne, leading lady in scores of sci-fi and horror films including the 1940 serial ''Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe'' and ''Black Friday'' with Boris Karloff, has died. She was 84. Gwynne died March 31 of a stroke following surgery at the Motion Picture County Hospital in Woodland Hills, her family said. Born Marguerite Gwynne Trice in Waco, Texas, she studied drama at Stephens College in Missouri and moved to Los Angeles with her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986
Who cares if Clarke and his fanzine are boycotted by LucasBerg? Who cares if Clarke is yet another "sci-fi" expert who detests the term sci-fi? I mean, where was Calendar when Famous Monsters, the magazine that started it all back in '58, was the lone voice in the media, giving millions of fans and scholars alike virtually their only glimpse of fantasy and horror films? Why has Forrest J. Ackerman, FM's esteemed creator and editor for a quarter of a century, never merited a Calendar cover story?
BUSINESS
September 19, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Call it fright on demand. Lions Gate Entertainment, Sony Pictures Television and Comcast Corp. plan to launch a video channel on Halloween devoted entirely to horror programs. The new channel, called Fearnet, is to be available on cable as video on demand. It also is to be available on the Internet and through wireless systems. The channel's target audience is men and boys from 14 to 29 years old.
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