Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHorror Films
IN THE NEWS

Horror Films

ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Billed as being "based on the true story," the sort-of spooky, sort-of stupid "The Haunting in Connecticut" follows a family who move into a rental home to put their cancer-stricken son closer to the clinic where he is receiv- ing experimental treatments. Caught between economic realities and difficult emotional truths, they stay put even after discovering that their new house was once a funeral home also used for rituals to speak with the dead.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
The best horror films are actually about something larger than the grim events that typically befall their characters. It's what makes Tobe Hooper's "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" films, George Romero's "Living Dead" movies or the more recent "House of the Devil" and "Let the Right One In" so powerful: They examine societal change and the fear of the other through a distorted lens. As with far too many recent horror sequels and reboots, "Texas Chainsaw 3D," the latest off-target entry in the once radically unnerving series, has little on its mind beyond good-time gore.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Horror Films That Scared a Lot Of Us: 12 Popular Genre Films Since 1970 "Alien" (1979; $40.3 million in box-office rentals) "A Nightmare on Elm Street 3" (1987; $21.4 million) "The Amityville Horror" (1979; $35 million) "The Exorcist" (1973; $89 million) "The Fly" (1986; $17.5 million) "Halloween" (1978; $18.5 million) "King Kong" (1976; $36.9 million) "The Lost Boys" (1987; $14.5 million) "The Omen" (1976; $28.5 million) "Poltergeist" (1982; $38.2 million) "Poltergeist II" (1986; $20.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Chris LEE'S perceptive article ("Horror Returns to Make a Killing," Jan. 30) should have made mention of Danny Boyle's "28 Days Later." A smart, stylish and disturbingly real take on the "zombie" genre, the film was a huge success in the U.K. and went on to gross $45 million in the U.S. -- a considerable sum for such a modestly budgeted British movie. -- Alan Ireland Los Angeles Chris LEE repeats a fallacy that constantly occurs in articles on horror film revivals, that women are latecomers to their audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986
Who cares if Clarke and his fanzine are boycotted by LucasBerg? Who cares if Clarke is yet another "sci-fi" expert who detests the term sci-fi? I mean, where was Calendar when Famous Monsters, the magazine that started it all back in '58, was the lone voice in the media, giving millions of fans and scholars alike virtually their only glimpse of fantasy and horror films? Why has Forrest J. Ackerman, FM's esteemed creator and editor for a quarter of a century, never merited a Calendar cover story?
BUSINESS
September 19, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Call it fright on demand. Lions Gate Entertainment, Sony Pictures Television and Comcast Corp. plan to launch a video channel on Halloween devoted entirely to horror programs. The new channel, called Fearnet, is to be available on cable as video on demand. It also is to be available on the Internet and through wireless systems. The channel's target audience is men and boys from 14 to 29 years old.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
"Girls" creator Lena Dunham, horror producer Jason Blum and YouTube sensation Casey Niestat will deliver keynote addresses at the 2014 South by Southwest Film Conference and Festival, SXSW announced Tuesday. Next year will be the first that the Austin, Texas, film festival is programming keynote addresses, modeled on those at its sister festival, SXSW Interactive. Each of the keynote speakers fits into one of the distinctive niches at SXSW, which is known for its horror films, comedies and low-budget offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | Susan King
Julie Adams nearly turned down the role that has made her a legend among sci-fi and horror films fans: Kay Lawrence in 1954's "Creature From the Black Lagoon. " But who could blame her? As a contract player at Universal six decades ago, she had played opposite Arthur Kennedy in 1951's "Bright Victory," Jimmy Stewart in the 1952 western "Bend of the River" and heartthrob Tyrone Power in 1953's "Mississippi Gambler. " And now the studio wanted her for a black-and-white 3-D horror film that was sort of a fishy version of "Beauty and the Beast.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE post-World War II British cinema produced brilliant comedies from quirky Ealing Studios, titles such as "Kind Hearts and Coronets" and "The Lavender Hill Mob" as well as gritty "kitchen sink" dramas helmed by angry young filmmakers such as Tony Richardson, John Schlesinger, Lindsay Anderson, Clive Donner and Karel Reisz. Every so often a horror film such as "Dead of Night" or "The Queen of Spades" would pop up on the landscape.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|