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Horror Films

ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Jennifer Tilly, who starred in "Bride of Chucky" and "Seed of Chucky," returns to "Chucky" land in the latest installment, "Curse of Chucky," part of a six-film package - "Chucky: The Complete Collection Limited Edition" - that Universal is releasing Oct. 8 to celebrate the killer doll's 25th anniversary. Tilly also appears in the high-school romance movie "The Secret Lives of Dorks," which opened this weekend, and in Wallace Shawn's "Grasses of a Thousand Colors," which will have its American premiere at New York's Public Theater on Oct. 7. How did you get involved with "Chucky"?
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Susan King
The World 3-D Film Expo III, which opens Friday and continues through Sept. 15 at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, has lined up some of the well-known classics of the format's heyday 60 years ago, including 1953's "House of Wax" with Vincent Price, the 1953 musical "Kiss Me Kate" with Kathryn Grayson, Howard Keel and Ann Miller, and 1954's "Creature From the Black Lagoon" with Julie Adams and the Gill-man. FOR THE RECORD: World 3-D Film Expo: In the Sept. 5 Calendar section, an article about the World 3-D Film Expo misspelled the name of the Arriflex camera as Aeroflex.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- Jennifer Aniston gets back to one of her trademark comedy roles in "We're The Millers,"  the fake-family road-trip movie with Jason Sudeikis that opened Wednesday. But ask her what challenge she'd like to take on in the near future, and she'll throw out a surprise. "I'd really like to do a horror film," the actress said in an interview. "Like a psychological exorcist-type thing. " PHOTOS: Summer Sneaks 2013 She started to add "I haven't done one" -- then caught herself; Aniston's first role, several years even before "Friends" is in an early '90s horror movie titled "Leprechaun.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By John Horn
Lianne MacDougall, a film writer who specializes in genre movies and has been linked romantically to Quentin Tarantino, has been accused of repeated plagiarism and apparently has taken to Twitter to apologize for lifting whole sections of other articles. Mike White at the website the Impossible Funky  said he has chronicled a series of verbatim lifting published by MacDougall, who uses the Web alias Spiderbaby and writes for the sites FEARnet.com and hosts the online show Frightbytes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
Poor Charlie Sheen! In the opening of "Scary Movie V," no sooner does he bed Lindsay Lohan - both barely convincing playing themselves - than a ghost kills him and kidnaps his three kids. (Legal troubles aside, Lohan is fine.) Three months later, Snoop Dogg finds the now-crabwalking moppets in a haunted cabin in Humboldt County and delivers them and their new ghost mom back to civilization. Three months is auspicious. "Scary Movie V" lifts its plot from Jessica Chastain's surprise horror hit "Mama," released in January, and if you think three months is an impossible amount of time to write and produce a feature film, well, it is. In the Oscar nominee's role is former Disney star Ashley Tisdale, here seen having her way with a microwave.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
The sports biopic "42" will rough up its box office rivals as it steps up to the plate this weekend. The drama about famed baseball player Jackie Robinson is poised to claim No. 1, opening with a solid $20 million, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. (Warner Bros. is predicting a softer launch of around $15 million.) The weekend's other debut, the spoof "Scary Movie 5," will likely take in a respectable $17 million or so. PHOTOS: Scenes from '42' For years, Hollywood has been eager to make a movie about Robinson, the  first African American to play Major League Baseball.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen and Nicole Sperling
A spaceship-like, 1,000-seat theater may be the most striking feature of the Motion Picture Academy's planned film museum at LACMA, but the organization has also revealed a bevy of other details about what the six-story, 290,000-square-foot facility opening in 2017, will include. Some highlights: Ground Floor: This will consist of a public piazza, the museum lobby, a cafe and a gift store. The piazza will connect the film museum to the rest of the LACMA campus. The academy says "a majestic red carpet and Cannes-style grand staircase" will take visitors into the soaring 1,000-seat, domed "premiere theater," to be named for David Geffen, who has pledged $25 million to the $300-million museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is no cabin in the woods or scary house at the end of the street in "Amour. " There is no ax-wielding Jack Nicholson running around. Yet filmmaker Michael Haneke's examination of the final days of a long life - and a long love - may be the quintessential horror film for our times. It has a remarkable ability to scare the living daylights out of audiences of any age. With five Oscar nominations - including best picture in the overall race and best foreign language film as Austria's entry - "Amour" is one of the finest relationship dramas ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Horror films do not thrill me, but more elegant efforts sometimes offer an irresistible chill. Such is the case with two films decades apart in time but similarly atmospheric. The older of the two is 1932's "White Zombie," an early stab at zombie-themed material that stars Bela Lugosi in one of his first roles after the huge success of "Dracula. " This DVD/Blu-ray Kino Classics release includes a digital restoration and the original unrestored version. More contemporary is Roman Polanski's 1968 "Rosemary's Baby," taken from the Ira Levin novel and starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes and Ruth Gordon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Beautifully envisioned, badly constructed, the only truly terrifying things in the new horror movie "Mama" are the fake tattoos, short black hair and black T-shirts meant to turn "Zero Dark Thirty" star Jessica Chastain into a guitar-shredding, punk rocker chick. That misfire becomes just one more bump in the road when you long for more bumps in the night. Though there are a few frights - a skittering shape that keeps showing up is the best - rather than dishing out pure scary movie chills, first-time director Andy Muschietti serves up a darkly twisted allegory about a mother's protective instincts.
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