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SPORTS
February 3, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visitors to Jorge Hank Rhon's office at Caliente Race Track are relieved to see that his Rottweiler dog and pet cheetah are no longer there. The Rottweiler would sit for hours, staring holes through people. And the cheetah always looked hungry. The shock factor of the office menagerie has been reduced considerably. Parrots in cages are like bookends for Hank's desk. Behind the desk, in a tank, is a collection of eels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California labor authorities say some key thoroughbred trainers are thwarting an ongoing investigation into possible overtime and minimum wage violations at California's racetracks by collectively refusing to turn over payroll records. Labor inspectors this summer launched surprise sweeps in the stable areas of five major racetracks, including one at Del Mar in San Diego County last week, to see if low-wage workers who take care of the racehorses are getting paid properly.
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SPORTS
December 31, 1991 | Associated Press
A strike by the nation's thoroughbred jockeys apparently was averted Monday night when the Jockeys' Guild reached a tentative agreement on a contract with the Thoroughbred Racing Assns. Guild spokesman Brian Meara said the tentative agreement will result in the cancellation of a walkout by riders on Wednesday. Final details of the contract will be worked out by today, he said. The guild advised riders to accept regular mounts for Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweeping legislation that would regulate the living and working conditions at California's horse racing tracks passed the key state Senate Governmental Organization Committee on Tuesday. But although industry leaders have shown some support for the measure, they complain that, among other things, it would unfairly force horse trainers to form a collective bargaining group to negotiate with labor unions.
SPORTS
December 28, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE
Cliff Goodrich, president of Santa Anita, said Friday that jockeys at his track will not be making any concessions in their national dispute over accident insurance if they ride on New Year's Day. "The issue of television rights will be settled in court," Goodrich said. "The jockeys won't be giving up anything by riding here or any place else on Jan. 1 (next Wednesday)."
BUSINESS
January 29, 1990 | From United Press International
Harness-Racing Drivers Lose Against Los Alamitos: A U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles rejected a request by licensed harness-racing drivers to block Los Alamitos race track from limiting the number of drivers it will allow to race during its five-month meet. Attorneys for the drivers argue that the Los Alamitos Racing Assn. is effectively revoking their licenses by only allowing "popular" drivers with winning records to work at the track.
SPORTS
May 10, 1992 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
California race tracks and the union representing more than 2,000 pari-mutuel clerks have reached a tentative contract agreement that could have the experienced personnel back punching tickets by Wednesday. Leaders of the Service Employees International Union, Local 280, have called a ratification meeting for Monday morning at the Hyatt Airport Hotel near Hollywood Park.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990
Both sides in the dispute over the disqualification of about 150 harness-racing drivers at Los Alamitos presented their case before an administrative law judge during a six-hour hearing Monday in Costa Mesa. The judge, Amanda Behe, may submit her opinion in time for the California Horse Racing Board meeting in Albany on March 30. The board can either accept or reject Behe's decision.
SPORTS
December 10, 1994 | BILL CHRISTINE
A possible agreement in the insurance negotiations between jockeys and the nation's racetracks developed Friday after the tracks presented what they called "our best and final offer." Speaking from Tucson, John Giovanni, national manager of the Jockeys' Guild, said, "This could work. . . . I'll take it back to my executive board, and we'll crunch some numbers."
SPORTS
January 7, 1993 | BOB MIESZERSKI
A deadline of Jan. 20 was set for each aspect of the industry to select two representatives to the California Horse Racing Industry Coalition, a follow-up to the recent two-day conference in Pasadena at which the sport's problems were addressed. About 75 owners, trainers, Hollywood and Santa Anita track officials and other people in the industry attended a 90-minute meeting after the races Wednesday at Santa Anita and agreed on the deadline.
SPORTS
May 10, 1992 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
California race tracks and the union representing more than 2,000 pari-mutuel clerks have reached a tentative contract agreement that could have the experienced personnel back punching tickets by Wednesday. Leaders of the Service Employees International Union, Local 280, have called a ratification meeting for Monday morning at the Hyatt Airport Hotel near Hollywood Park.
SPORTS
December 31, 1991 | Associated Press
A strike by the nation's thoroughbred jockeys apparently was averted Monday night when the Jockeys' Guild reached a tentative agreement on a contract with the Thoroughbred Racing Assns. Guild spokesman Brian Meara said the tentative agreement will result in the cancellation of a walkout by riders on Wednesday. Final details of the contract will be worked out by today, he said. The guild advised riders to accept regular mounts for Wednesday.
SPORTS
December 30, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Wednesday's entries were drawn, showing that all of the important riders at Santa Anita were supporting a Jockeys' Guild walkout, Cliff Goodrich, president of the track, announced Sunday that there is a 99% chance that a strike will be averted. Goodrich participated in a conference telephone call Sunday involving Jockeys' Guild representatives and negotiators from the Thoroughbred Racing Assns., the trade group that represents most of the country's major tracks.
SPORTS
December 29, 1991 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Anita president Cliff Goodrich is hopeful a conference call scheduled for 8 a.m. today will lead to a resolution of the dispute between the Thoroughbred Racing Assn. and the Jockeys' Guild that might lead to a jockey strike Wednesday. Representatives of the TRA, Jockeys' Guild and their respective attorneys will participate in the call.
SPORTS
January 19, 1990 | JOHN CHERWA, TIMES ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
Twenty harness racing drivers denied the opportunity to drive in harness races at Los Alamitos Race Course have asked the California Horse Racing Board to overrule the new track operator. Los Alamitos President Lloyd Arnold, one of four who bought the track from Hollywood Park for $71 million in November, had set minimum criteria for drivers at the beginning of the current harness meeting. Standards were based on experience and success rate the last two years.
SPORTS
January 26, 1990 | JOHN CHERWA
Twenty harness racing drivers who were denied the opportunity to drive in races at Los Alamitos Race Course failed in their attempt Wednesday to get a temporary restraining order in federal district court. The court did grant the group a hearing on Feb. 12. Richard Craigo, an attorney representing the group, said he is seeking the injunction on the basis that the drivers' civil rights were violated because they were denied an opportunity to earn a living.
SPORTS
December 28, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE
Cliff Goodrich, president of Santa Anita, said Friday that jockeys at his track will not be making any concessions in their national dispute over accident insurance if they ride on New Year's Day. "The issue of television rights will be settled in court," Goodrich said. "The jockeys won't be giving up anything by riding here or any place else on Jan. 1 (next Wednesday)."
SPORTS
December 13, 1991 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The threat of a walkout by the nation's jockeys on Jan. 1 is real. At a two-day meeting this week in Las Vegas, some of the most prominent members of the Jockeys' Guild indicated that they are prepared to lead a work stoppage because of the group's dissatisfaction with an accident- and health-insurance plan that has been offered by the tracks. "I can't afford to ride without insurance," said Pat Day, who leads the country in purses this year with $14.4 million.
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