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Horse Racing Maryland

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June 9, 1993 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A unique paperweight sits on Paul Berube's desk in the offices of the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau in Elkton, Md. Laminated in the top is a parimutuel ticket from the ninth race on Feb. 14, 1975, at Bowie Race Course, a track that is a training center for horses now. The numbers on the $18 trifecta ticket on Berube's desk are 2, 8 and 12. The actual 1-2-3 finish of that race were horses numbered 8, 12 and 2, but since the ticket on Berube's desk was a "box," it was a winner anyway.
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July 22, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Timonium Fair in suburban Baltimore ran its first race in 1887. A bullring with a 700-foot stretch, Timonium is better known for its horse auctions than its 10-day fall race meet. It was at Timonium where Mace and Jan Siegel bought their first horse in 1964. Najecam was her name--the Siegels' first names spelled backward--and she didn't win a race until she was a 5-year-old.
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SPORTS
December 15, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Maryland Racing Commission approved Wednesday the testing of a system that will allow people to place bets from their homes. "The group we're responding to is the under-30 crowd," said Mark Brenner, president of On Demand Services, a Tulsa, Okla.-based communications company developing the system. The system is similar to pay-per-view television and will work by hooking a cable box to a television set.
SPORTS
October 14, 1995 | ANDREW BEYER, WASHINGTON POST
Saturday's Maryland Million has drawn what may be the best group of horses in the event's 10-year history, including some runners with Grade I stakes credentials and national reputations. Their presence makes the races interesting in two ways. Even though horseplayers may be jaded from simulcasts, most still relish the chance to see the sport's stars perform live. And in some cases, a horse with a big reputation might be overbet, creating an opportunity for profit.
SPORTS
October 14, 1995 | ANDREW BEYER, WASHINGTON POST
Saturday's Maryland Million has drawn what may be the best group of horses in the event's 10-year history, including some runners with Grade I stakes credentials and national reputations. Their presence makes the races interesting in two ways. Even though horseplayers may be jaded from simulcasts, most still relish the chance to see the sport's stars perform live. And in some cases, a horse with a big reputation might be overbet, creating an opportunity for profit.
SPORTS
December 4, 1992 | ROSS PEDDICORD, BALTIMORE SUN
Laurel-Pimlico track operator Joe De Francis has warned Virginians that they could become involved in "ruinous competition" with Maryland if people who want horse racing in the Old Dominion pass up a deal to become part of a unique Maryland-Virginia circuit. De Francis' comments came at a Wednesday news conference in Washington where he and J. Carter Fox, president of the Chesapeake Corp., unveiled plans to build a new track in the Williamsburg, Va., area.
SPORTS
July 22, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Timonium Fair in suburban Baltimore ran its first race in 1887. A bullring with a 700-foot stretch, Timonium is better known for its horse auctions than its 10-day fall race meet. It was at Timonium where Mace and Jan Siegel bought their first horse in 1964. Najecam was her name--the Siegels' first names spelled backward--and she didn't win a race until she was a 5-year-old.
SPORTS
May 16, 2006 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
PREAKNESS STAKES Saturday, 3:12 p.m. PDT, Channel 4, at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. * It has been a difficult year or so for horse racing in Maryland, but this week a new Kentucky Derby winner named Barbaro grazed peacefully outside his stall at Fair Hill Training Center in Elkton.
SPORTS
December 15, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Maryland Racing Commission approved Wednesday the testing of a system that will allow people to place bets from their homes. "The group we're responding to is the under-30 crowd," said Mark Brenner, president of On Demand Services, a Tulsa, Okla.-based communications company developing the system. The system is similar to pay-per-view television and will work by hooking a cable box to a television set.
SPORTS
June 9, 1993 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A unique paperweight sits on Paul Berube's desk in the offices of the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau in Elkton, Md. Laminated in the top is a parimutuel ticket from the ninth race on Feb. 14, 1975, at Bowie Race Course, a track that is a training center for horses now. The numbers on the $18 trifecta ticket on Berube's desk are 2, 8 and 12. The actual 1-2-3 finish of that race were horses numbered 8, 12 and 2, but since the ticket on Berube's desk was a "box," it was a winner anyway.
SPORTS
December 4, 1992 | ROSS PEDDICORD, BALTIMORE SUN
Laurel-Pimlico track operator Joe De Francis has warned Virginians that they could become involved in "ruinous competition" with Maryland if people who want horse racing in the Old Dominion pass up a deal to become part of a unique Maryland-Virginia circuit. De Francis' comments came at a Wednesday news conference in Washington where he and J. Carter Fox, president of the Chesapeake Corp., unveiled plans to build a new track in the Williamsburg, Va., area.
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