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BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | Bloomberg News
President Clinton threw his support behind Germany's Horst Koehler to lead the International Monetary Fund, signaling the end of a four-month struggle over who will head the IMF. "The president told Chancellor [Gerhard] Schroeder that the United States is prepared to support Mr. Koehler as the new head of the IMF," White House spokesman Joe Lockhart said. U.S. backing will likely clinch Koehler's nomination, because the U.S.
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WORLD
May 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former IMF head Horst Koehler was elected Germany's ninth postwar president by a special federal assembly. Koehler, who quit the International Monetary Fund in March to run for the largely ceremonial office, won narrowly with 604 votes from the 1,204-member assembly. Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's candidate, Gesine Schwan, got 589 votes, at least seven of them from Koehler's side.
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BUSINESS
March 18, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Monetary Fund took a first, cautious step into an era of potentially sweeping change Friday, as its prospective managing director declared that the fund should take greater care to prevent the sorts of financial crises that swept much of the globe in 1997 and 1998. "I'm fully committed to open dialogue and discussion with the U.S.
WORLD
March 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
International Monetary Fund chief Horst Koehler said in Washington that he was quitting to accept the conservative nomination for the mostly ceremonial German presidency. Since the conservative parties hold a majority in the assembly that will choose the next president May 23, nomination virtually assures victory. The post would put Koehler, 61, at the center of fresh attacks on the economic record of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, a Social Democrat.
WORLD
March 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
International Monetary Fund chief Horst Koehler said in Washington that he was quitting to accept the conservative nomination for the mostly ceremonial German presidency. Since the conservative parties hold a majority in the assembly that will choose the next president May 23, nomination virtually assures victory. The post would put Koehler, 61, at the center of fresh attacks on the economic record of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, a Social Democrat.
WORLD
May 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former IMF head Horst Koehler was elected Germany's ninth postwar president by a special federal assembly. Koehler, who quit the International Monetary Fund in March to run for the largely ceremonial office, won narrowly with 604 votes from the 1,204-member assembly. Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's candidate, Gesine Schwan, got 589 votes, at least seven of them from Koehler's side.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2000 | Associated Press
The International Monetary Fund's board moved quickly to endorse Germany's Horst Koehler as the lending agency's new leader, ending a messy succession squabble. The IMF said the 24 directors unanimously agreed on Koehler as successor to Frenchman Michel Camdessus, who resigned in February after 13 years as head of the 182-nation organization.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2000
* Italian auto maker Fiat reportedly is on the verge of striking a partnership with General Motors. The Financial Times of London, citing people familiar with the talks, reported today that GM was expected to announce this week that it would acquire a 20% stake in Fiat worth about $2.4 billion. In return, Fiat was to take a 5% interest in GM, also worth about $2.4 billion, making it one of the U.S. auto maker's largest shareholders. No money was to change hands, the Times reported.
WORLD
May 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The International Monetary Fund's executive board selected former Spanish Finance Minister Rodrigo Rato as the fund's new managing director. Rato will succeed Horst Koehler, who resigned March 4 to run for the presidency of Germany. Rato was selected by consensus for a five-year term, the IMF said. Rato's knowledge of Latin America will help in consultations with the fund's two biggest borrowers, Brazil and Argentina, development groups said.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
G-7 Concerned About World Economic Slowdown: Senior officials from the Group of Seven industrialized nations are worried about the world economic slowdown but agreed that global recession is not around the corner. Horst Koehler, German state secretary for the Finance Ministry, told reporters that "immense topics" had been discussed. The deputy finance ministers held three days of confidential talks in a secluded hotel in a town near Frankfurt.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2000 | Associated Press
The International Monetary Fund's board moved quickly to endorse Germany's Horst Koehler as the lending agency's new leader, ending a messy succession squabble. The IMF said the 24 directors unanimously agreed on Koehler as successor to Frenchman Michel Camdessus, who resigned in February after 13 years as head of the 182-nation organization.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The International Monetary Fund took a first, cautious step into an era of potentially sweeping change Friday, as its prospective managing director declared that the fund should take greater care to prevent the sorts of financial crises that swept much of the globe in 1997 and 1998. "I'm fully committed to open dialogue and discussion with the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | Bloomberg News
President Clinton threw his support behind Germany's Horst Koehler to lead the International Monetary Fund, signaling the end of a four-month struggle over who will head the IMF. "The president told Chancellor [Gerhard] Schroeder that the United States is prepared to support Mr. Koehler as the new head of the IMF," White House spokesman Joe Lockhart said. U.S. backing will likely clinch Koehler's nomination, because the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2000
* Italian auto maker Fiat reportedly is on the verge of striking a partnership with General Motors. The Financial Times of London, citing people familiar with the talks, reported today that GM was expected to announce this week that it would acquire a 20% stake in Fiat worth about $2.4 billion. In return, Fiat was to take a 5% interest in GM, also worth about $2.4 billion, making it one of the U.S. auto maker's largest shareholders. No money was to change hands, the Times reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Inge Meysel, 94, the German actress dubbed "Mother of the Nation" after World War II, died Saturday of heart failure at her home near Hamburg, Germany. Meysel was banned from the stage during the Nazi era because her father was Jewish. But after the war, she appeared in many popular television shows, and over the last 40 years had performed 100 TV and stage roles. Her last appearance was in May in a German television crime series.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Argentina will resume regular Treasury bill auctions on May 8, two weeks after the postponement of a planned sale sent bonds plunging to their lowest level since 1998, Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo said. Cavallo credited the International Monetary Fund for his decision to return to the market, saying he has almost "completely closed" an accord with the IMF to back his economic program and open the way for billions of dollars in loans.
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