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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Maugh is a Times staff writer.
Florence S. Wald, the former dean of the Yale University School of Nursing who brought hospice to the United States and in the process revolutionized the care of the terminally ill, died of natural causes Saturday at her home in Branford, Conn. She was 91.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' largest nonprofit AIDS services agency is suing to stop the city from foreclosing on a onetime AIDS hospice that was built with a city housing loan and is now being used as offices for HIV case managers. The AIDS Healthcare Foundation opened Linn House, its third hospice, on donated land near West Hollywood in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2007 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Far fewer Asian Americans, African Americans and Latinos than whites use hospice care for terminal illnesses, according to a study released Thursday on how end-of-life care in California differs by race and ethnicity. And a disproportionate number of African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans die suddenly and unexpectedly of accidents or assaults, often in hospital emergency rooms that lack family support programs or bereavement counseling.
HEALTH
February 19, 2007
Re: ["Life on Her Terms," Feb. 5]: What a wonderful article. My mother is an 88-year-old with congestive heart failure and is a client with San Diego Hospice. We had learned of their services after my 64-year-old sister developed pancreatic cancer in 2005. My sister passed within four months. But congestive heart failure is so different. We are aware that my mother can have a final attack at any moment, but in the interim she has moved to an independent living facility close by. With their help and the invaluable help of hospice, she has had an unbelievable good turn in the quality of her life.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Rep. Charlie Norwood, 65, is leaving Washington to receive hospice care at home in Augusta, Ga., forgoing further treatment for lung cancer that has spread to his liver. Norwood's spokesman, John Stone, said the seven-term Republican was not resigning from Congress, but was going home to be with his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Gary Miller leaned back on his bed, looking very tired. He had already packed his bags and now was waiting for a cab he really didn't want to come. "This is not what I had in mind for the last few days of my life," he said Friday. Miller, 59, was one of about 18 men and women who learned last week that they could not remain at the Carl Bean House, the last hospice and 24-hour nursing facility dedicated to AIDS patients in Los Angeles County.
HEALTH
February 6, 2006 | Hilary Waldman, Hartford Courant
WHEN a visiting nurse suggested that Earleen Jackson consider hospice care, the 68-year-old woman was wary. "At first I thought they wanted me to come to hospice so I could die here," said Jackson, who was diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer in June. Her son had a similar reaction when she told him about it, the New Haven, Conn., woman recalled. The Jackson family's suspicion about hospice and palliative care is not uncommon among African Americans. When the Rev. Kenric A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2005 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Dame Cicely Saunders, who launched the modern system of hospice care, has died in the London hospice she founded in 1967. She was 87. Saunders died Thursday of cancer at St. Christopher's Hospice, where she had been a patient for some time, said Barbara Monroe, chief executive of the hospice. "Countless patients and families in this country and all over the world have benefited from Dame Cicely's vision and leadership on end-of-life care," said Mike Richards, Britain's national cancer director.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
In low, gray skies, a small plane circled Thursday, tugging a banner imploring Florida's governor: "Rescue Terri Now." Outside the grounds of Woodside Hospice, where Terri Schiavo was in her seventh day without food or water following last Friday's court-ordered removal of a feeding tube, demonstrators -- some of whom had been there for days -- camped out on quilts and blankets, looked upward, cheered and waved signs of their own: "Free Terri." "Pray." "Hospice or Auschwitz."
NATIONAL
March 20, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
On a patch of beaten down grass ringed by orange plastic fencing, a small, tired-looking woman talked into the television cameras Saturday afternoon, begging for her child's life. "My daughter is in the building behind me, starving to death," said Mary Schindler, mother of Terri Schiavo, standing outside Woodside Hospice. "We laughed together, we smiled together, we talked together. She is my life," Schindler said. "I am begging Gov.
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