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Hospice

NATIONAL
March 20, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
On a patch of beaten down grass ringed by orange plastic fencing, a small, tired-looking woman talked into the television cameras Saturday afternoon, begging for her child's life. "My daughter is in the building behind me, starving to death," said Mary Schindler, mother of Terri Schiavo, standing outside Woodside Hospice. "We laughed together, we smiled together, we talked together. She is my life," Schindler said. "I am begging Gov.
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HEALTH
June 14, 2004 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
My brother took more trains, planes and automobiles in the last week of his life than he had taken in months, perhaps years. Those journeys were all the more surprising because they occurred in an intensive-care unit at the end of his three-year battle with bone marrow cancer. Bedridden after being rushed to the hospital for what would be the final eight days of his life, Kenny casually mentioned that he was visiting Detroit.
HEALTH
May 17, 2004 | Erika Hobbs, Special to the Baltimore Sun
A car accident that crushed Karen Muranaka's spine two years ago and left her a paraplegic threatened to take away one of her favorite pastimes: gardening. But in Kernan Hospital's rehabilitation garden in Baltimore, she learned how to plant forsythia and hyacinths from her wheelchair. And in the process, she found new hope. "I look for it harder now -- the birds, colors, greenness of grass every spring," says the 46-year-old Eldersburg, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | Stephanie Stassel, Times Staff Writer
During his lifetime, Fletcher Jackson has had many friends, but none like Susan Townsend. His days at a Pasadena convalescent hospital begin and end with a phone call to Townsend, who visits him once or twice a week, occasionally bringing her husband and two children. The rattan bookcase in his room is from Townsend's home. The bulletin board she got him is covered with postcards from her recent trips. Sometimes, she surprises him with strawberry ice cream, his favorite.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Amedisys Inc., which provides nursing services in patients' homes, agreed Wednesday to buy 11 home-healthcare agencies from Santa Barbara-based Tenet Healthcare Corp. for about $19 million to expand into Mississippi and throughout the Southeast. The cash purchase, which also includes two hospices, is expected to be completed by May 1, Baton Rouge, La.-based Amedisys said in a statement. Amedisys said it expected the services to add about $28 million a year in revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The estate of Joan B. Kroc has given $20 million to the San Diego Hospice, which provides care for the terminally ill, hospice officials said Tuesday. Kroc, the widow of McDonald's executive Ray Kroc, died Oct. 12 of cancer at the age of 75. In 1985, the nonprofit hospice received $18.5 million from Kroc to build a facility in the Hillcrest area of San Diego, overlooking Mission Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Josefina B. Magno, an oncologist whose compassion for a dying patient led her to become an early proponent of hospice care in the United States, has died. She was 83. Magno, a Philippines-born physician who immigrated to the U.S. in the 1960s, died July 27 of congestive heart failure in her native Manila. She helped found one of the first hospices in the U.S. as well as national and international organizations devoted to promoting humane care for the dying.
OPINION
May 19, 2003
Re "Living and Dying Along Class Lines," Commentary, May 13: Pamela Fitzsimmons raises a good point about Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft's meddling in the practice of medicine in Oregon. The citizens of that state have the right to approve physician-assisted suicide, which they have done by twice passing the so-called Death With Dignity Act. However, it is sheer nonsense to claim that if physician- assisted suicide is outlawed, only the wealthy would not die a painful death. Fitzimmons has obviously not heard of hospice, which provides expert pain management and symptom control to an untold number of terminally ill patients yearly, with the cost generally covered by Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance or donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
The Livingston Memorial Visiting Nurse Assn. & Hospice will provide an eight-week training course for hospice volunteers beginning Feb. 25. Volunteers might be called upon to run errands as well as provide company and support to patients and their families. Training is conducted by nurses, social workers, chaplains and bereavement counselors. The training, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on eight consecutive Tuesdays, will be held at 1996 Eastman Ave. in Ventura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2002 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The kids in Mirman School's seventh-grade community service class are on a roll. Let them loose on the nation's budget deficit. Send them to the Middle East. They seem to have a knack for pulling off the big play. A few months ago, youngsters who attend the private Santa Monica school decided to help a charity, TrinityKids Care, a pediatric hospice that provides home care to terminally ill children and their families.
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