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Hospira Inc

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BUSINESS
September 21, 2006
Hospira Inc., a Lake Forest, Ill.-based hospital supply company spun off from Abbott Laboratories, agreed to buy Mayne Pharma Ltd., an Australian maker of generic injectable drugs, for $2 billion.
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BUSINESS
September 21, 2006
Hospira Inc., a Lake Forest, Ill.-based hospital supply company spun off from Abbott Laboratories, agreed to buy Mayne Pharma Ltd., an Australian maker of generic injectable drugs, for $2 billion.
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NATIONAL
April 6, 2011
AUSTIN, Texas — A Texas man scheduled to be put to death Tuesday received a stay of execution from the U.S. Supreme Court. It was granted after assertions that inmate Cleve Foster's state-appointed lawyers were ineffective and prevented him from raising claims of innocence. "I'm thrilled that the Supreme Court stayed Mr. Foster's execution and that they will be looking at the important issues raised," said Maurie Levin, Foster's attorney. Texas, which executes more inmates than any other state, has 30 days to respond to Foster's petition for a rehearing.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Federal officials on Tuesday launched a crackdown against several companies that market an eye wash and a widely used skin cream without government approval, saying these prescription medications could pose risks. The eye wash, known as a balanced salt solution, is used to keep the eyes moist during surgery. Two companies, Alcon Inc. and Akorn Inc. have versions that are approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and are not affected, the FDA said in a public notice.
OPINION
January 27, 2011
In response to violations of international human rights norms, Western governments are slapping sanctions on a rogue regime by halting exports of a deadly substance. That's nothing new; what is new is that the rogue nation is the United States. The substance in question is sodium thiopental, a fast-acting anesthetic designed for surgery that has been put to a more sinister purpose in 34 states, which use it to numb condemned prison inmates before injecting another drug that stops their breathing and a third that stops their hearts.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A shortage of the chemotherapy drug cytarabine is threatening the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in children around the country, with some hospitals rationing supplies of the drug and others turning away new patients. Cytarabine is a key ingredient in the drug cocktails given to such children. "Without it, most patients die," Louis J. DeGennaro, chief mission officer of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, told Bloomberg News . "There's really no substitute for cytarabine in those chemotherapy regimens.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
President Obama is pushing federal regulators to do more to address dangerous shortages of crucial medicines, sidestepping a deadlocked Congress that has not dealt with the problem. In an executive order signed Monday, the president directed the Food and Drug Administration to press drug companies to more quickly report shortages to federal regulators, an early warning that advocates say can help mitigate shortages. The order, which administration officials concede does not give the FDA any new authority, also told the agency to expedite reviews of new manufacturing facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2010 | Carol J. Williams
A federal appeals court in San Francisco late Monday ordered a trial judge to reconsider a ruling that allowed for a convicted murderer and rapist to be executed this week at San Quentin State Prison. Albert Greenwood Brown was scheduled to die at 9 p.m. Thursday for the 1980 killing of a 15-year-old Riverside girl. But the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said U.S. District Judge Jeremy Fogel erred by offering Brown a choice of a one-drug lethal injection or a three-drug cocktail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The sole U.S. maker of the anesthetic used in executions announced Friday it would stop manufacturing sodium thiopental to prevent its product from being used to put prisoners to death. Discontinuance of the drug that has been in short supply nationwide for the past year portends long-term complications for death penalty states. Some, like California, might have to revise laws governing executions and those seeking supplies from foreign makers may be turned away by countries that condemn capital punishment.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2011 | By Bruce Japsen
Hospitals across the country are running out of key drugs used in surgeries and to treat some diseases, including cancer, causing doctors to turn to older treatments. In some cases, hospitals are paying higher prices to get their patients necessary care because wholesalers are hoarding needed medicines. Part of the shortage is being caused by manufacturing issues and quality-control problems at a number of companies that include Lake Forest, Ill.-based Hospira Inc., one of the primary makers of generic injectable prescription medicines, as they respond to the federal government's crackdown on drug safety.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2011 | By Bruce Japsen
In 2001, Abbott Laboratories spent nearly $7 billion on the biggest acquisition in the company's 123-year history, primarily to get access to one drug: Humira. Since then, the North Chicago drug giant has raked in more than $24 billion in sales from Humira, a pricey medicine derived from human cells and used to treat a variety of autoimmune diseases. This year, Humira is forecast to have its biggest year ever, with some analysts projecting more than $7 billion in sales. But the national healthcare law is intended to put the brakes on the profit bonanza from Humira, as well as many other biotechnology drugs, by opening up the sector to generic competition.
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