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Hospital Beds

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON
St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank has donated two hospital beds to a needy Mexican family whose twin 13-year-old boys are suffering from muscular dystrophy. The boys developed the disease at age 6 and are in the late stages of the illness and unable to move.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz
In the annals of Texas journalism, Robert Heard stands out for many things: a biting wit, a prolific career, a lawyer's understanding of lawmaking, a determination to get the story even at considerable personal risk. It was the last trait that catapulted him from news reporter to news figure on Aug. 1, 1966, when he was shot in the shoulder during Charles Whitman's bloody rampage from the top of the University of Texas Tower in Austin. Heard, a 36-year-old Associated Press reporter, had followed two highway patrol officers on a wild sprint across a parking lot, but he forgot his Marine's training to zigzag.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
A federal judge issued a temporary restraining order Monday preventing Los Angeles County from eliminating 100 hospital beds at County-USC Medical Center. U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper gave county lawyers and patient advocates a week to present arguments related to the state's interest in the suit. Cooper also has barred closure of Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy and Jack Dolan
Two portable medical facilities set up near the L.A. Marathon's finish line in Santa Monica were packed Sunday afternoon with injured and dehydrated runners seeking relief from the 26.2-mile race. Alexis Perez-Rogers, a first-year medical student working at one of the facilities, said more than 50 people had stopped for help since 11 a.m.  VIDEO:Crossing the finish line "We have everything from ibuprofen to IV fluids, if necessary,” said Perez-Rogers.  Most needed ice or water, but others sought additional aid in cots set up in the back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they endeavor to overhaul their troubled health care system, Los Angeles County officials are quietly weighing a proposal to lease hundreds of beds from private hospitals, so they can build a dramatically downsized and less expensive replacement for the aging County-USC Medical Center.
NEWS
June 18, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The intensive care unit of the main hospital here was full Thursday, and the hisses, clicks and beeps of the machines that give life could not drown out an unspoken word: revenge. The victims of revenge, along with those who sought it, lay in the six beds in the unit's two rooms. They had come from across Kosovo in the days since international peacekeepers arrived in the province.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | Reuters
Offers of hospital beds for Sarajevo's sick and wounded flooded in to the United Nations on Monday from governments under fire at home for failing to act to end Bosnia's civil war. Italy offered to spearhead the international effort by promising 450 beds--enough to clear a list of seriously wounded patients drawn up last week after Britain and Sweden offered to take in Sarajevo's most desperate cases.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1988
ATI Medical, a Glendale provider of medical equipment to hospitals and the entertainment industry, said it scrapped plans to acquire SMI, a privately held company that rents out specialty hospital beds. However, ATI said it was negotiating a revised agreement that would allow ATI to buy beds from SMI and directly rent them through its existing offices, except in Florida, Illinois, Wisconsin, South Carolina, Ohio, Kentucky and Michigan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1985 | Associated Press
For Dr. Donald Cheu, the possibility of a catastrophic earthquake conjures up images of hospital workers fending off hungry people while the severely injured are left to die because doctors have no time to treat them. "Timewise, we don't want to spend eight or 10 hours (performing surgery) on a single patient when we can use the same time on 200 patients needing more minor, life-saving operations," Cheu told a group of disaster planners recently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1997 | DAVID CUNDIFF, David Cundiff is an internist at County-USC
The Board of Supervisors' vote to spend up to $900 million for a replacement Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center with 600 beds was a tremendous disappointment to me as an attending physician there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Steve Lopez
It was a privilege recently to meet Bernard M. Tuvman, an Army Air Corps waist gunner whose B-17 Flying Fortress was shot down during World War II. Tuvman parachuted from his spiraling aircraft and was held as a POW in Stalag 17 for 20 months before his liberation at the end of the war. And now I'm sorry to report that Tuvman , a long-time resident of West Los Angeles, died this week, at 91, after several weeks of failing health. I met Tuvman at the Home for Heroes hospital at the West L.A. VA, where he had formed a rich friendship with his roomate, Phil Nadler, whose plane was shot down over the Pacific during World War II. Tuvman, who worked for many years as a glazier, and Nadler, an attorney, formed a fast bond, comforting each other as they lay side-by-side in their hospital beds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2013 | By Patt Morrison, Los Angeles Times
Southern California is miserably accustomed to serial killers - the Manson Family, the Hillside Strangler, the Freeway Killer, the Skid Row Slasher. But there had never been one quite like Richard Ramirez, who deserved the flashy, fearsome tabloid nickname "The Night Stalker. " In the spring of 1984, Los Angeles was about to hoist its flags to welcome the world to the Summer Olympics. Richard Ramirez, as slapdash car thief, a weed and junk-food fancier, a dabbler in satanism, began the slow, bloody trek of murders that would build to a gory frenzy by the following summer.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- A nanny accused of stabbing to death two young children left in her care pleaded not guilty to two counts of murder Wednesday from a hospital bed, where she has been held since trying to commit suicide by slashing her own throat and wrists. Yoselyn Ortega's alleged crime horrified New York City, where the sight of nannies accompanying toddlers is a common one, especially in upscale neighborhoods like the Upper West Side, where Ortega worked for the family of Marina and Kevin Krim.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The robot, sitting quietly in a corner, suddenly hums to life and rolls down the hospital corridor on three wheels. Perched atop the sleek machine is a monitor showing the smiling face of Dr. Paul Vespa, the physician who's piloting the rover from miles away. He can pull up to a patient's bedside, ask questions, observe symptoms and even use a stethoscope. "People forget that you're on the robot, and you forget that you're on the robot," says Vespa, a neurocritical care specialist at UCLA who uses the device to consult in other hospitals and check on UCLA patients from home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
The number of state hospital psychiatric beds dropped by 14% nationwide from 2005 to 2010, pushing the severely mentally ill into emergency rooms, jails and prisons, according to a report advocating for more inpatient treatment. The report, released Thursday by the Treatment Advocacy Center , lauded the decades-old goal of treating patients in community facilities whenever possible, rather than institutionalizing them. However, the discharge of hundreds of thousands of people has proved to be disastrous, said the report, noting that "95% of the nation's public psychiatric hospital beds [have]
SPORTS
April 3, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Praise God for a successful surgery...road to recovery! Lets goo. Much love to the fans for your support and kind words twitter.com/JLin7/status/1? - Jeremy Lin (@JLin7) April 2, 2012 Jeremy Lin has been in seemingly constant contact with his fans since undergoing knee surgery Monday, sending out a photo of himself recovering in his hospital bed (above) on Twitter and participating in a lengthy Q&A session on his Facebook page after he returned home that night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996 | JOSH MEYER and JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles County officials disclosed Monday that as part of the massive restructuring of their health system required to get a $364-million bailout from the federal government, they plan to eliminate one-third of the county's 2,600 inpatient hospital beds.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The robot, sitting quietly in a corner, suddenly hums to life and rolls down the hospital corridor on three wheels. Perched atop the sleek machine is a monitor showing the smiling face of Dr. Paul Vespa, the physician who's piloting the rover from miles away. He can pull up to a patient's bedside, ask questions, observe symptoms and even use a stethoscope. "People forget that you're on the robot, and you forget that you're on the robot," says Vespa, a neurocritical care specialist at UCLA who uses the device to consult in other hospitals and check on UCLA patients from home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
To survive the unprecedented challenges coming with federal healthcare reform, California hospitals are upending their bedrock financial model: They are trying to keep some patients out of their beds. Hospital executives must adapt rapidly to a new way of doing business that will link finances to maintaining patients' health and impose penalties for less efficient and lower-quality care. It's too soon to know precisely how the changes will affect patients. But experts say more will be treated in clinics and doctors' offices than in hospitals.
SPORTS
October 2, 2010 | Detroit Free Press
? The Michigan State Spartans huddled in the locker room around Don Treadwell's BlackBerry not long after their 34-24 victory over No. 11 Wisconsin on Saturday, eager to hear a special message. From his Sparrow Hospital bed a few miles away, Coach Mark Dantonio had been watching as his No. 24 Spartans (5-0) delivered their most complete effort of the season against one of the Big Ten's elite. It was difficult for all in the 100-plus crowd to hear what he had to say, but the most important part came through loud and clear.
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