Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHospital Insurance Trust Fund
IN THE NEWS

Hospital Insurance Trust Fund

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
I read Lamm's article with interest. I was surprised that a person with his prestigious title could be so misinformed! Social Security/Medicare covers far more than the elderly and will pay tomorrow's recipients far more than today's! Lamm is confusing Social Security with the "the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund" and should check with the Internal Revenue Service before making exaggerated statements such as lumping Medicare payments with total medical spending for all residents of the United States!
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Medicare trust fund, which now pays the hospital bills of 34 million elderly Americans, will run out of money in five to seven years unless fundamental reforms are enacted to control soaring health care costs, federal officials said Tuesday.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Medicare trust fund, which now pays the hospital bills of 34 million elderly Americans, will run out of money in five to seven years unless fundamental reforms are enacted to control soaring health care costs, federal officials said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
I read Lamm's article with interest. I was surprised that a person with his prestigious title could be so misinformed! Social Security/Medicare covers far more than the elderly and will pay tomorrow's recipients far more than today's! Lamm is confusing Social Security with the "the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund" and should check with the Internal Revenue Service before making exaggerated statements such as lumping Medicare payments with total medical spending for all residents of the United States!
NEWS
February 1, 1985
Social Security's once impoverished old-age trust fund, which borrowed $17.5 billion in 1982 so it could issue checks on time, paid back a quarter of those loans. It returned $1.8 billion to its sister hospital insurance trust fund and $2.5 billion to the disability insurance fund, Social Security spokesman Jim Brown said. The old-age fund is now back in the black and showing surpluses each year instead of deficits.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Social Security fund that covers Medicare hospital benefits grew last year but still could go bankrupt shortly after the year 2000, the fund's trustees reported Tuesday. The Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, which pays for inpatient care for the elderly and long-term disabled, will run out of money in 2002 if factors such as economic growth, inflation, unemployment, birth and death rates take a moderate course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1997
Bipartisan agreement to reduce the rate of growth in Medicare spending has extended by some years the life of the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, over which insolvency loomed. But Medicare's basic structural problems, which can only worsen as tens of millions of baby boomers enroll in the program starting early in the coming century, remain to be addressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1985
Come Oct. 1 the current 16-cent-a-pack tax on cigarettes is scheduled to drop to 8 cents, a move that would deprive the Treasury of needed revenue even as it undercut a modest economic disincentive to smoking. Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret M. Heckler believes, as anyone with any sense must, that Congress made a mistake when it voted last year to let the cigarette tax fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1988
The annual report on the financial condition of Social Security and Medicare raises once again critical issues that are not being adequately addressed in Washington. Social Security itself remains in good condition, with increasing surpluses of income over payments growing so that there will be no question about the ability of the program to meet its obligations until the middle of the next century.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Responding to accusations by Democrats and liberal groups that Republicans are trying to "end Medicare as we know it," GOP candidates have been blasting Democrats for cutting billions from Medicare to fund the 2010 healthcare reform law, better known as Obamacare. As the party's presumptive vice presidential nominee, Rep. Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin, said last week, "[T]he president took $716 billion from the Medicare program -- he raided it -- to pay for Obamacare. " Ryan's an odd messenger on this point.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1995
House and Senate Republicans are having a hard time agreeing on how best to restrain Medicare's soaring costs to help meet their target of a balanced federal budget within seven years. But that still leaves them miles ahead of the Democrats, who appear only now to have realized that Medicare is in deep financial trouble.
OPINION
December 15, 1996
Republicans are calling on President Clinton to take the lead in proposing changes to save Medicare from insolvency. The advice is sound as well as urgent. In five years the trust fund that pays for hospitalization under Medicare will be broke. By then, the Congressional Budget Office says, Medicare's net outlays will have risen to about $345 billion from $198 billion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|