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Hospitals California

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NEWS
February 6, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unexpected consequence of a gun control law that took effect Jan. 1, the names of people admitted for mental health treatment at California hospitals are being recorded in state law enforcement computers. Although meant to keep firearms away from those who are considered dangerous to themselves or to society, the practice also applies to psychiatric patients who voluntarily check themselves in for treatment and have no history of violent behavior.
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BUSINESS
November 17, 2010 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
California's largest for-profit health insurer has agreed to pay a total of $1.62 million to seven hospitals to settle allegations that it failed to properly reimburse the providers for patient care. Anthem Blue Cross of California underpaid hospitals for charges that exceeded contracted daily rates, the California Department of Managed Health Care said in its agreement with the insurer. Anthem, a unit of health insurance giant WellPoint Inc. of Indianapolis, admitted no wrongdoing and said in a statement that it settled the matter to avoid litigation.
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NEWS
March 27, 1988 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
Death rates associated with heart bypass operations, gallbladder removals and three other common surgeries varied tremendously among California hospitals in 1985, according to a Times analysis of data covering nearly all patients hospitalized in the state. At seven hospitals, more than 1 in 10 bypass surgery patients died after the operation, compared to the statewide average of fewer than one in 20.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2009 | Lisa Girion and Mark Medina
Hospitals across California and the country are reeling from the effects of the economic downturn and the troubled financial markets. Patients are putting off medical care because of job losses, job insecurity and high out-of-pocket expenses. As a result, the number of paying patients and profitable elective procedures is down. At the same time, the number of uninsured patients whom hospitals treat is rising. Like just about everybody else, hospitals are losing money on their investments.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles had the highest standardized death rate for newborn babies of all California hospitals in 1986, according to a sophisticated analysis of perinatal death-rate data by researchers at UC Santa Barbara, which is being made public today. King and three other Southern California hospitals with more than 600 deliveries had significantly higher-than-expected perinatal death rates when compared to the statewide average, the report said.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., acknowledging that it has been delinquent in paying thousands of insurance claims filed by doctors and hospitals, said Thursday that it reached an agreement with state regulators to pay penalties and interest on the claims. The Santa Ana managed-care company disclosed the agreement after concerned analysts had issued warnings about a state crackdown on the delinquent payments, sending PacifiCare's stock into a tailspin.
NEWS
July 9, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A psychiatric outpatient armed with two knives entered a hospital and held a nurse at knifepoint for two hours in an elevator before surrendering, police said. The man held one knife on the nurse and the other pointed at his chest during the standoff at St. Mary's Hospital, police said. The man entered the psychiatric unit and took one nurse hostage, but she escaped with the help of another nurse, officers said.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a result of the U.S. Supreme Court decision Thursday allowing hospitals to sue states over Medicaid funding, Southern California hospitals will take the state to court, officials predicted. "The hospitals will sue, the physicians' groups will sue, the counties will sue," said David Langness of the Hospital Council of Southern California. He contended that the state's Medicaid reimbursement policies have "bankrupted the health-care industry." "It's been murder," Langness said. ". . .
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
In 1986, 96 state-licensed hospitals in California had heart surgery units and 130 hospitals had catheterization labs, according to the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. It is not known for certain how often coronary angioplasties are performed at hospitals that lack heart surgery services, but the situation appears to occur infrequently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1988 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
State Senate President Pro Tem David Roberti said Friday that he plans to introduce legislation requiring all private and public hospitals in California to conduct complete evidence-gathering examinations of rape victims. While his proposed legislation would affect hospitals throughout the state, Roberti said the chief problem is in the Los Angeles area, particularly on the Westside and in the downtown area, where there is a lack of hospitals that take rape victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | DAREN BRISCOE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Finding the right nurse-to-patient ratio for California hospitals is proving harder than expected, delaying the release of new state-mandated staffing guidelines. The state has yet to finish developing the regulations, which were supposed to take effect by Tuesday. They may not be ready for several months, according to officials. "We're not going to meet the Jan. 1 deadline," said Lea Brooks, spokeswoman for the state Department of Health Services, the agency charged with setting the ratios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State lawmakers are working to give hospitals more time to renovate or rebuild their facilities to resist the effects of a major earthquake. The Assembly Health Committee voted 11 to 0 Wednesday to give hospitals up to five more years, until 2013, to meet state seismic requirements. If they don't meet the previous deadline of 2008, hospitals would be required to reach milestones set out in an agreement with the state or be fined. All Democrats voted for the bill while Republicans abstained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A state hospital has been put on lock-down for three weeks after a set of keys turned up missing. An employee misplaced the keys, which opened doors to offices and secure areas, at Atascadero State Hospital on June 29. After a search, administrators decided to change more than 3,000 locks. Hospital employees must now escort all patients between their wards and other places such as the library and gym. About 70% of patients are usually allowed to visit approved destination without escort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to fill all their permanent nursing staff openings, California hospitals are tapping into a new source: traveling nurses. Commonly called "travelers," the nurses pack their supplies and scrubs and move from city to city, hospital to hospital, every few months. Many are young, single and driven by a desire to see the country or to sample different hospitals, while others are older and simply looking for a change.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2001 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., acknowledging that it has been delinquent in paying thousands of insurance claims filed by doctors and hospitals, said Thursday that it reached an agreement with state regulators to pay penalties and interest on the claims. The Santa Ana managed-care company disclosed the agreement after concerned analysts had issued warnings about a state crackdown on the delinquent payments, sending PacifiCare's stock into a tailspin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California has agreed to pay $22.5 million to settle allegations that physicians at teaching hospitals at UC Irvine and four other campuses overbilled the government in filing Medicare claims, officials announced Friday. The U.S. attorney's office said the payment was to compensate for overcharges for physician services at the medical centers between 1994 and 1998. The university denied any wrongdoing in the 13-page settlement.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
Some hospital officials and the California Medical Assn. are sharply divided over legislation, scheduled for an Assembly vote today, that would place new restrictions on hospitals seeking to discipline physicians accused of incompetence. The bill, which has passed the Senate, would impose a detailed protocol and timetable on hospital disciplinary proceedings and give accused doctors the right to be represented by attorneys at hearings.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With legislators and the governor making no progress toward closing the state's $3.6-billion budget gap, Controller Gray Davis said Monday that about $114 million in Medi-Cal payments have been stalled because the state's check-writers lack the legal authority to pay the bills. Davis also said the state, as of Monday, had spent $2.2 billion more than it took in during the 1989-1990 fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California has agreed to pay $22.5 million to settle allegations that physicians at teaching hospitals at UCLA and four other campuses overbilled the government in filing Medicare claims, officials announced Friday. The U.S. attorney's office said the payment was to compensate for overcharges for physician services at the medical centers between 1994 and 1998. The university denied any wrongdoing in the 13-page settlement.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swamped by patients and hemorrhaging money, California emergency rooms cannot continue to guarantee quality care on demand unless the state steps in with financial help, a new report warns. Emergency rooms are closing across California, cutting services and diverting ambulances when they run out of beds. The wait for treatment can stretch for hours, on-call medical specialists are stretched perilously thin, and paramedics are routinely forced to hold patients in ambulances until beds open up.
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