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BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | Cristina Lee / Times staff writer
HealthTrade International Inc., a Mission Viejo trading company specializing in medical and health care equipment, said it has recently signed an agreement to provide artificial lenses to several hospitals in Southern China. Dr. Bart S. Chapman, president of HealthTrade, said the value of the contract is small but may open the door to future sales in China. He said Chinese officials have already indicated that they plan to order more artificial lenses next year.
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WORLD
August 25, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Friends and relatives of a patient who died on the operating table marched on Nanchang Hospital No. 1 brandishing pitchforks and clubs. About 100 staff members, among them young doctors, prepared for the onslaught by arming themselves with long sticks and cans of mace, while the security guards donned police vests and helmets. What followed was a pitched battle in the lobby atrium with horrified patients gawking from the floors above. Although nobody was seriously injured in Tuesday's melee, the incident brought attention to a wave of violence in Chinese public hospitals.
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NEWS
July 5, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many Chinese, the prospect of going to the doctor is worse than getting sick. Decades of command economy and a cradle-to-cremation welfare system have left hospitals in no better shape than any other decrepit state-owned industry. Patients are treated with the bare minimum of care, and few have dared to ask for more. But with the introduction of free-market reforms, competition and choice are sweeping across every walk of life in the world's most populous country.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many Chinese, the prospect of going to the doctor is worse than getting sick. Decades of command economy and a cradle-to-cremation welfare system have left hospitals in no better shape than any other decrepit state-owned industry. Patients are treated with the bare minimum of care, and few have dared to ask for more. But with the introduction of free-market reforms, competition and choice are sweeping across every walk of life in the world's most populous country.
WORLD
August 25, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Friends and relatives of a patient who died on the operating table marched on Nanchang Hospital No. 1 brandishing pitchforks and clubs. About 100 staff members, among them young doctors, prepared for the onslaught by arming themselves with long sticks and cans of mace, while the security guards donned police vests and helmets. What followed was a pitched battle in the lobby atrium with horrified patients gawking from the floors above. Although nobody was seriously injured in Tuesday's melee, the incident brought attention to a wave of violence in Chinese public hospitals.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1994
Styles on Video, a Chatsworth-based company that designs and sells imaging systems, said it has secured new contracts that could add as much as $2 million to the company's 1995 revenues. The company said it has signed contracts with 40 hospitals in China and Hong Kong to supply digital cameras used in delivery rooms to take pictures of newborn babies. The company is responsible for arranging printing of the pictures and delivering them to the infants' parents within 24 hours.
WORLD
September 16, 2002 | From Reuters
Rat poison may be to blame for a mass food poisoning that killed 41 people and sent hundreds to hospitals near China's eastern city of Nanjing over the weekend, state media reported today. "Initial investigations indicate there was rat poison in the food that was served to victims," the China Daily quoted Zhou Qiang, a Jiangsu provincial government spokesman, as saying.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2005 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles medical instrument maker's Chinese subsidiary has agreed to plead guilty to a U.S. charge of bribing physicians and laboratory workers at government-operated hospitals in China, the company and federal authorities said Friday. DPC Tianjin, a unit of Diagnostic Products Corp., will pay $4.8 million in fines and fees. The parent company discovered the problem more than two years ago and went to U.S. authorities, said Jim Brill, chief financial officer.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | United Press International
Health Minister Claude Evin ordered a French drug company to resume supplying the controversial abortion pill RU-486 today, two days after the company halted distribution, citing boycott threats from right-to-life groups. Roussel Uclaf said it will resume distributing the pill to certified hospitals and abortion clinics, which began using it on a trial basis in September with the Health Ministry's approval.
NEWS
August 5, 1986 | DAVE LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Never a day goes by that Dr. Jordan M. Phillips doesn't turn over a new leaf. He can't avoid it. Piled within his warehouse in Santa Fe Springs are tens of thousands of medical books--and as fast as he can ship them out, more keep arriving daily. This overwhelmingly exceeds the expectations of the retired Downey physician who, after several visits to China with his wife, Mary, decided to embark on a venture to aid his colleagues in the People's Republic.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1990 | Cristina Lee / Times staff writer
HealthTrade International Inc., a Mission Viejo trading company specializing in medical and health care equipment, said it has recently signed an agreement to provide artificial lenses to several hospitals in Southern China. Dr. Bart S. Chapman, president of HealthTrade, said the value of the contract is small but may open the door to future sales in China. He said Chinese officials have already indicated that they plan to order more artificial lenses next year.
WORLD
May 25, 2008 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Thousands of patients are being moved from overloaded hospitals in China's earthquake zone to neighboring provinces in an effort to ease the medical crunch as attention shifts from rescuing survivors to caring for the injured and preventing epidemics. Premier Wen Jiabao said Saturday in the town of Yingxiu that 10,000 medical workers have been dispatched to the quake-hit area to stop the spread of disease. At his side, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon pledged support for reconstruction.
HEALTH
March 14, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
In what scientists said was the first new treatment in a decade for heart attacks, researchers reported last week that the drug clopidogrel, when used in combination with other standard treatments, could prevent repeat heart attacks and reduce death rates by as much as 36%. Taken together, the findings of three studies presented at the American College of Cardiology meeting last week in Orlando, Fla.
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