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NEWS
August 11, 1989 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
The AIDS epidemic is threatening to financially overwhelm inner-city hospitals, limiting their ability to treat other patients and raising the specter of health-care rationing, according to a study to be published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The study of 276 hospitals in 39 states was conducted by the National Public Health and Hospital Institute and represents the most comprehensive survey to date of the financial impact on hospitals of treating AIDS patients.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2010 | By Larry Gordon
The University of California regents Thursday approved the controversial payment of $3.1 million in performance bonuses to 38 senior executives at UC's five medical centers. The regents emphasized that the payments were linked to improved patient health and stronger hospital finances and said they were important tools to attract and retain talent. They said the bonuses were part of a 16-year-old plan funded by hospital revenue, not state funds or student fees. An additional $33.7 million is distributed among 22,000 lower-ranking medical employees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to study whether the county should pay the private hospital bills of drunk drivers and others who receive medical treatment while in police custody before being arrested. The issue was pressed by officials of Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital in the Santa Clarita Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2009 | Larry Gordon
University of California regents Thursday expressed support and financial trepidation about a proposal that the university play a key role in reopening Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital near Watts in 2012. Several regents said they want ironclad assurances from Los Angeles County supervisors and state officials that UC would not be held responsible for any costs or liabilities for what is expected to be a 120-bed facility with an emergency room. The hospital, which once had 233 beds, was shut down in August 2007 after repeated failures in patient care, including some that led to deaths.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1987 | NANCYRIVERA BROOKS and ROBERT S. WEISS, Times Staff Writers
Amid tears from staff members, Brotman Medical Center closed its Michael Jackson Burn Center on Friday. Brotman spokeswoman Diane Sherman said the Culver City hospital shut the 23-bed burn center, which had only four patients Friday, with "deep regret." She blamed it on the center's "significant losses."
BUSINESS
September 4, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since Buena Park Community Hospital shut down its money-losing medical surgical business three years ago and converted to a psychiatric hospital, it has managed to stop its losses and even eke out a small profit most of the time. But it's not exactly thriving. "In today's health-care market, if you are breaking even or making a small profit, you are doing all right," said Earl Bernard, administrator of the facility that is doing extensive national advertising and offering discounted rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decision took doctors and administrators by surprise. For weeks, they had warned Medi-Cal patients that their large, community hospital was quitting the state health insurance program for the poor. But three days before their hospital's Medi-Cal contract expired, the state revamped the rules. In a new procedure which began on Nov. 17, Medi-Cal patients could seek treatment at any hospital in Fountain Valley, Westminster or Huntington Beach--not just those with a contract for indigent care.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Deep budget cuts at Orange County's biggest psychiatric hospital ravaged patient care, resulting in one unattended patient's death from a drug overdose, an attempted suicide and a homosexual gang rape of a teen-ager, two former top administrators have charged in lawsuits. The suits--which also accuse Brea Hospital Neuropsychiatric Center and its corporate parent, Comprehensive Care Corp.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost a year after it opened, the Irvine Medical Center still has more empty beds than it would like and more troubles than it bargained on. The center's woes have prompted layoffs and stirred rumors in the medical community that it might be up for sale. But hospital officials, while acknowledging that the center has problems, angrily deny that there are plans to put it on the auction block.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nurse Denise O'Neil's phone was ringing off the hook last winter with job offers, but she was heartsick over the reason. Her employer, Sherman Oaks Hospital and Health Center, had just been thrust into the public spotlight as one of two hospitals owned by financially troubled Triad Healthcare of Encino. Every week, it seemed, the newspapers brought more news of corporate turmoil, staggering debt and, finally, bankruptcy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2005 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors voted Tuesday to shelter the county's public health agency from a possible financial meltdown and clashed over the pace of reform at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center. Supervisors unanimously approved the concept of separating public health functions such as bioterrorism prevention and disease control from the Department of Health Services, which also operates the county's hospital system.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2004 | Lisa Girion, By Lisa Girion Times Staff Writer
Tenet Healthcare Corp. Chief Executive Trevor Fetter on Tuesday sought to dispel any idea that the nation's second-largest hospital chain faced a liquidity crunch and said its financial problems could be repaired. Tenet's stock has slid significantly in the last week after it cut a new deal with lenders that required the Santa Barbara-based company to pledge capital stock in its hospital subsidiaries and slashed its credit line to $500 million in cash loans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a blunt display of the politics that undergird Los Angeles County's ailing health system, county supervisors Tuesday moved toward expanding emergency facilities at three county hospitals even as they anticipate cutting other health services to deal with a looming $1-billion deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration said Tuesday it is closing a regulatory loophole that has enabled California to get billions of dollars in federal funds to help operate hospitals that serve large numbers of poor, uninsured residents. California could lose more than $300 million a year from the $1 billion in federal money flowing annually to its 73 "safety net" hospitals, officials said. The cuts will be gradual, probably starting in three years and reaching their full effect at the end of the decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
County-USC Medical Center officials in May 2000 turned down thousands of dollars to supplement its chronically understaffed emergency dialysis unit by training more specialized nurses. Less than three months after administrators rejected the money, a critically ill woman died after waiting four hours for specially trained nurses to arrive and perform dialysis.
HEALTH
May 21, 2001
Regarding "U.S. Nurses Not Alone in Their Frustration" (May 7): It is time that Pamela Thompson of the American Hospital Assn. and others of her ilk in the hospital industry realize that hospitals were created for patients to receive nursing care. Rick Wade of the AHA went so far as to say that patients expect a hospital to operate at peak ability around the clock. Well, Mr. Wade, that's what hospitals should do. That's what you would want them to do for your loved ones. That's what they can do with proper staffing levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at Santa Ana Hospital Medical Center said Tuesday that they will close its 24-hour emergency room in November and use the space to expand its obstetrics department. The closure is not considered a significant blow to the county's emergency medical system because the medical center does not receive paramedic patients, said Betty O'Rouke from county emergency medical services. The county has 30 hospitals in the emergency medical system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writers
When the Los Angeles County trauma system was set up in 1983, private hospitals battled hard and even sued to be included in the prestigious network, regarded as the crown jewel of the county's emergency services program. This month, the 10th trauma center of the original 23 permanently bowed out of the system. On busy nights, half a dozen of the remaining ones are full and temporarily closed.
NEWS
April 25, 2001
The state must find a way to help California's hospitals meet costly seismic standards without financially crippling the institutions or causing the costs of health care to soar, legislators said Tuesday as they prepared to introduce two bills on the issue. At a news conference outside the Capitol, the officeholders said most California hospitals will face almost insurmountable challenges in meeting a 2008 deadline to seismically upgrade about 2,700 buildings.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Betting on an old-line city in a slowing economy, the owner of the Waterfront Hilton in Huntington Beach said Monday it has started construction next door of a 519-room resort that will be one of Orange County's 10 largest hotels. Robert Mayer Corp., in conjunction with Hyatt Corp., also said it landed permanent financing for what will be called the Hyatt Regency Grand Coast Resort, which will dwarf the 290-room Hilton. Stephen K.
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