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NEWS
May 19, 1988
Nearly half the 290 doctors suspended by Florida's Tampa General Hospital for falling behind in paper work rushed to complete patient records to win reinstatement, a spokeswoman said. The list of suspensions, which affected admitting privileges only, stood at 159 doctors a day after it was posted, said Cindy Tanner, hospital spokeswoman. The suspensions represented about one-third of the staff.
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BUSINESS
July 2, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Tenet Healthcare, owner and operator of 113 hospitals in 17 states, completed its purchase of two hospitals Sunday in West Palm Beach, Fla., from closely held Intracoastal Health Systems for $244 million. Santa Barbara-based Tenet agreed to spend an additional $36 million over the next five years for capital improvements at the hospitals, Good Samaritan Medical Center and St. Mary's Medical Center, Tenet said.
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NEWS
April 1, 1995 | Associated Press
A hospital where errors killed one patient and left another with the wrong leg amputated has admitted another mistake: nearly sterilizing a woman without her consent. The woman, whose name was not released, had one of her Fallopian tubes tied during a Cesarean delivery March 16 at University Community Hospital. The doctor stopped the procedure after an operating room staff member told him the woman didn't authorize it, the hospital said Thursday. A woman can still give birth with one tube tied.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | Reuters
An Orlando hospital was closed for several hours Thursday while doctors determined whether 10 airport baggage handlers had been exposed to anthrax, a potentially deadly bacterium. Officials at Florida Hospital East said the workers, none of whom showed signs of exposure, were decontaminated and released. The baggage handlers had come into contact with a box shipped from Puerto Rico that contained animal hides and a warning about possible anthrax contamination.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | Associated Press
Federal regulators granted a major reprieve to a mistake-ridden hospital Wednesday, finding that it had corrected deficiencies and clearing it to keep receiving millions in government health care funding. University Community Hospital had been threatened with the loss of that funding because one patient lost the wrong leg in a botched amputation and another died after he was mistakenly removed from a ventilator.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal officials said that they found "an immediate and serious threat to the health and safety of patients" at University Community Hospital in Tampa. One man died when he was mistakenly taken off a ventilator and another had the wrong leg amputated at the hospital. The federal Health Care Financing Administration warned the hospital to clear up its problems to avoid losing its Medicare funding. The 424-bed facility has until April 20 to start correcting the problems.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | Reuters
An Orlando hospital was closed for several hours Thursday while doctors determined whether 10 airport baggage handlers had been exposed to anthrax, a potentially deadly bacterium. Officials at Florida Hospital East said the workers, none of whom showed signs of exposure, were decontaminated and released. The baggage handlers had come into contact with a box shipped from Puerto Rico that contained animal hides and a warning about possible anthrax contamination.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after convening a special session on abortion Tuesday, the Florida Legislature dealt setbacks to four restrictive measures sought by Gov. Bob Martinez in the first test of a U.S. Supreme Court decision allowing states to impose greater limits on abortions.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
When Robert Mays had to tell his only child that she was not his biological daughter, "she cried and cried for a long time," then asked him to explain what it meant, Mays said Wednesday. Mays, his voice breaking at times, spoke publicly for the first time since genetic tests confirmed a Pennsylvania couple's claim that 10-year-old Kimberly Michelle is their daughter. "I held her. She just simply wept. I was crying myself. She said: 'Daddy, Daddy, Daddy! What does this mean?'
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A Siamese twin who was surgically separated from his brother last week died in a St. Petersburg hospital. James and Jakob Watkins, born joined at the chest and abdomen on Feb. 28, were separated in an 11-hour operation last Tuesday. The death of James, who doctors said was the weaker of the two, was announced by officials of All Children's Hospital who said the family had requested that details be kept private. Jakob Watkins remained in critical but stable condition.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | TOM WELLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Justin Bates was just a toddler when his mother rushed him to the hospital with an asthma attack that left him gasping. A medical error that day in 1985 left Justin blind, paralyzed and unable to speak. For years, red tape over financial compensation snarled the hopes his mother had of bringing him home. Now almost 12 years old, he's finally been released.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | From Associated Press
A maintenance worker turned the wrong valve and shut off a hospital oxygen line, sending one woman into a coma and leaving dozens of other patients without backup oxygen for up to 15 minutes. The 55-year-old woman, whose name was withheld at her family's request, was in critical condition Wednesday at Holmes Regional Medical Center, two days after the shut-off. "At this point, her prognosis is not good," said hospital spokeswoman Valerie Davis.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | Associated Press
Federal regulators granted a major reprieve to a mistake-ridden hospital Wednesday, finding that it had corrected deficiencies and clearing it to keep receiving millions in government health care funding. University Community Hospital had been threatened with the loss of that funding because one patient lost the wrong leg in a botched amputation and another died after he was mistakenly removed from a ventilator.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | Associated Press
A hospital where errors killed one patient and left another with the wrong leg amputated has admitted another mistake: nearly sterilizing a woman without her consent. The woman, whose name was not released, had one of her Fallopian tubes tied during a Cesarean delivery March 16 at University Community Hospital. The doctor stopped the procedure after an operating room staff member told him the woman didn't authorize it, the hospital said Thursday. A woman can still give birth with one tube tied.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal officials said that they found "an immediate and serious threat to the health and safety of patients" at University Community Hospital in Tampa. One man died when he was mistakenly taken off a ventilator and another had the wrong leg amputated at the hospital. The federal Health Care Financing Administration warned the hospital to clear up its problems to avoid losing its Medicare funding. The 424-bed facility has until April 20 to start correcting the problems.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | Reuters
A Florida hospital where doctors accidentally cut the wrong foot off a patient began a policy Thursday requiring staff to write the word "No" with a felt marker on patients' limbs that are not to be cut off. Willie King, 51, had surgery to remove his gangrenous right foot at Tampa's University Community Hospital last month. But he awoke to find that Dr. Rolando Sanchez had removed his left foot.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
The lawyer for Kimberly Mays' biological parents called for a criminal investigation Wednesday based on a former nursing aide's claim that a doctor ordered Kimberly swapped with another baby nearly 15 years ago. "Since Day 1, I have pleaded with people to treat the Twiggs as victims of a kidnaping," said John Blakely, the attorney for Ernest and Regina Twigg. "People haven't wanted to believe it, but they should start believing it now."
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A couple whose newborn baby was switched with another 12 years ago will receive $7 million under a settlement with the hospital, their attorney said. The agreement between Ernest and Regina Twigg and Hardee Memorial Hospital in Wauchula, Fla., reported last week, was reached in late April or early May. Both sides agreed to keep the amount secret.
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