Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHospitals Georgia
IN THE NEWS

Hospitals Georgia

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 11, 1994
Quality Systems Inc. said Wednesday that it has won a contract to develop and install an automated medical practice management software system at the 672-bed University Hospital in Augusta, Ga. Terms of the contract were not disclosed. The pact calls for the Tustin company to install customized software programs in one of the hospital's existing computer systems to provide the institution and its medical staff with real-time, interactive information processing capability.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 11, 1994
Quality Systems Inc. said Wednesday that it has won a contract to develop and install an automated medical practice management software system at the 672-bed University Hospital in Augusta, Ga. Terms of the contract were not disclosed. The pact calls for the Tustin company to install customized software programs in one of the hospital's existing computer systems to provide the institution and its medical staff with real-time, interactive information processing capability.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JOSEPH B. FRAZIER, Associated Press
Past the doors of the dying in a brightly colored room in the cancer ward, people smile, music plays and the sun shines in. "It is a happy area," said Sandra Yates, the unit's head nurse. "You don't see people walking by with long faces like you might at a funeral home. Family members are not afraid to come to the hospital. They might not look forward to it, but to me that sets it off. "If they aren't afraid to be here then we are doing our job."
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JOSEPH B. FRAZIER, Associated Press
Past the doors of the dying in a brightly colored room in the cancer ward, people smile, music plays and the sun shines in. "It is a happy area," said Sandra Yates, the unit's head nurse. "You don't see people walking by with long faces like you might at a funeral home. Family members are not afraid to come to the hospital. They might not look forward to it, but to me that sets it off. "If they aren't afraid to be here then we are doing our job."
NATIONAL
February 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
Hospitals in Georgia and northern Florida were warned Friday to temporarily stop using some blood from the American Red Cross because it was feared to be contaminated by mysterious white particles. The Red Cross reported that the particles are not infectious agents and that no harmful effects in patients have been reported. The particles probably came from plastic bags in which the blood was collected, said Chris Hrouda, Red Cross chief executive for blood services in the South.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Health officials Saturday tested white particles found in donated blood to determine what they are and where they came from, though they weren't considered to be dangerous. Testing was being handled by the Food and Drug Administration and the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Mary Malarkey, director of case management for the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Hospitals in Georgia and north Florida were exercising caution with the blood they had.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As seven newborn babies slept, gurgled and squirmed, their mothers and fathers waited to receive New Year's Eve gifts that would enable them to drive the infants home safely--and legally. The seven families are the first of 375 low-income families to get free infant car seats at an East Los Angeles hospital as part of a nationwide "Operation Baby Buckle" program.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rescue teams dug barehanded through the ruins, the government of Soviet Georgia appealed for emergency help and the known death toll mounted to 100 on Tuesday in the wake of the most powerful earthquake to hit parts of the northern Caucasus Mountains in 800 years. After a survey of the damage zone, Georgian officials said that 45 villages were destroyed by Monday's earthquake, including one that was "totally buried." An estimated 500 people were reported injured and 80,000 left homeless.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Medical Enterprises will plead guilty to government charges of Medicare fraud and conspiracy and pay a fine of $362.7 million to settle a sweeping federal investigation, company officials said Tuesday. The amount of the settlement, expected to be formally announced Thursday, surpasses any previous fine in a U.S. fraud case involving the health care or defense industries.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2003 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Nonemergency surgeries were postponed and hospital officials in parts of the South kept a close eye on blood supplies Monday after the American Red Cross expanded a quarantine issued when an unidentified white substance was discovered in bags of donated blood.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2007 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The list of quality-compromised goods from China got longer Thursday as federal authorities slapped a highly unusual hold on shrimp and certain fish from that country after tests showed contamination from potentially harmful drugs. The Food and Drug Administration said it would block all shipments from China of farm-raised shrimp, catfish, eel and two other kinds of fish until importers can produce independent test results showing the items to be free of drugs banned in U.S. fish farming.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Kimi Yoshino reporting from Scottsdale, Ariz. >>>
His smashed finger wrapped in bandages, Len Balon walked into an emergency room and eyed the flat-screen monitor broadcasting live wait times for Scottsdale Healthcare's area hospitals. Osborn Hospital, where he was standing: two hours and 55 minutes. Thompson Peak hospital, a short distance away: four minutes. Balon sat down to read a long Civil War memoir he'd brought in preparation for a long delay. His dread of an emergency room wait was justified. A study released this month found that wait times nationwide had continued to climb over the last 10 years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|