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NEWS
February 22, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of those sodden, snow-crusted days when the sky looks like dishwater, the office temperature won't budge above chilly and Dr. Vladimir N. Serov dreams of Santa Barbara. Not the town. The soap opera. The television melodrama has set Russians swooning for years, and it has inspired Serov to dream as well. He marvels aloud at the medical care on the show. He wishes he could lift it from the TV and graft it onto Russian society. Starting with his own obstetrics practice.
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WORLD
October 27, 2002 | Aaron Zitner, Times Staff Writer
The decision by Russian security forces to use a powerful chemical agent to end the confrontation with Chechen rebels in a Moscow theater crossed a line that U.S. experts concluded years ago could lead to disaster in such a situation.
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NEWS
July 2, 1994 | STEVEN GUTTERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sergei Novikov stood in the sun-drenched courtyard of Treatment and Labor Center No. 1, his home for eight of the last 12 years, waiting for freedom with nowhere to go. "I don't know what I'll do yet," said Novikov, a 39-year-old whose ruddiness, wrinkles and stoop make him look more like 60. "I'll get out there first, and then we'll see."
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larisa Dushko caught a glimpse of the soft curve of her firstborn baby's bottom, nothing more. It took her six years to even get her hands on a photograph, and she has never held her daughter's hand or touched her face. At birth, doctors called the baby a "monster" too terrible for her parents to look at, and her own grandfather tried to have her "put to sleep."
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The day he left a hospital after two weeks of treatment for reported heart problems, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired its director. Yeltsin signed a decree Monday firing Anatoly Martynov, general director of the presidential administration's medical center, presidential spokesman Sergei Sidorov confirmed. Martynov has been criticized for poor job performance, a Moscow newspaper said.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Larisa Dushko caught a glimpse of the soft curve of her firstborn baby's bottom, nothing more. It took her six years to even get her hands on a photograph, and she has never held her daughter's hand or touched her face. At birth, doctors called the baby a "monster" too terrible for her parents to look at, and her own grandfather tried to have her "put to sleep."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993 | ED BOND
The history as well as the science are what draw Dr. Joseph Turcillo and a small Burbank hospital to Kiev. "I thought even though we're a small hospital, we could get out of this provincial mind-set," said Turcillo, medical director for education at Thompson Memorial Medical Center. "And in this day of competition, it behooves a hospital to learn as much as it can to survive." The hospital is sponsoring from Sept. 4 to 14 the first American-Ukrainian medical conference in Kiev.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three patients lay unconscious in the intensive care unit, kept alive only by the Siberian hospital's life support system. Two were elderly; one was 39. None of them could know that the greatest threat to their lives was an unpaid bill. On Wednesday, the hospital in the town of Prokopyevsk received a telegram from the local power company, Gorelektroset, warning that it would have its electricity shut off the next day if it did not pay its debt of $95,000.
WORLD
October 27, 2002 | Aaron Zitner, Times Staff Writer
The decision by Russian security forces to use a powerful chemical agent to end the confrontation with Chechen rebels in a Moscow theater crossed a line that U.S. experts concluded years ago could lead to disaster in such a situation.
NEWS
July 15, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has canceled a state visit to Norway and all other activities on his schedule next week to stay in the hospital and continue recovering from heart trouble, aides announced Friday. Repeated earlier reports from the Kremlin had said that the 64-year-old Russian leader, who was rushed to the hospital Tuesday, was quickly improving and would check out Monday. In disclosing the abrupt change of plans, Yeltsin aide Viktor V.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three patients lay unconscious in the intensive care unit, kept alive only by the Siberian hospital's life support system. Two were elderly; one was 39. None of them could know that the greatest threat to their lives was an unpaid bill. On Wednesday, the hospital in the town of Prokopyevsk received a telegram from the local power company, Gorelektroset, warning that it would have its electricity shut off the next day if it did not pay its debt of $95,000.
NEWS
February 22, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of those sodden, snow-crusted days when the sky looks like dishwater, the office temperature won't budge above chilly and Dr. Vladimir N. Serov dreams of Santa Barbara. Not the town. The soap opera. The television melodrama has set Russians swooning for years, and it has inspired Serov to dream as well. He marvels aloud at the medical care on the show. He wishes he could lift it from the TV and graft it onto Russian society. Starting with his own obstetrics practice.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The day he left a hospital after two weeks of treatment for reported heart problems, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired its director. Yeltsin signed a decree Monday firing Anatoly Martynov, general director of the presidential administration's medical center, presidential spokesman Sergei Sidorov confirmed. Martynov has been criticized for poor job performance, a Moscow newspaper said.
NEWS
July 15, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has canceled a state visit to Norway and all other activities on his schedule next week to stay in the hospital and continue recovering from heart trouble, aides announced Friday. Repeated earlier reports from the Kremlin had said that the 64-year-old Russian leader, who was rushed to the hospital Tuesday, was quickly improving and would check out Monday. In disclosing the abrupt change of plans, Yeltsin aide Viktor V.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | STEVEN GUTTERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sergei Novikov stood in the sun-drenched courtyard of Treatment and Labor Center No. 1, his home for eight of the last 12 years, waiting for freedom with nowhere to go. "I don't know what I'll do yet," said Novikov, a 39-year-old whose ruddiness, wrinkles and stoop make him look more like 60. "I'll get out there first, and then we'll see."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993 | ED BOND
The history as well as the science are what draw Dr. Joseph Turcillo and a small Burbank hospital to Kiev. "I thought even though we're a small hospital, we could get out of this provincial mind-set," said Turcillo, medical director for education at Thompson Memorial Medical Center. "And in this day of competition, it behooves a hospital to learn as much as it can to survive." The hospital is sponsoring from Sept. 4 to 14 the first American-Ukrainian medical conference in Kiev.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Necessity was the mother of invention for doctors at the Vishnevsky Surgical Institute here. They found themselves with no cash, no future and too much time on their hands after the Soviet Union collapsed. But instead of despairing, the surgeons and technicians began a radical project--combining the medical expertise they had acquired over the years with the Western technology slowly becoming available here to create what officials say is Russia's first medical CD-ROM.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's families may be created in wondrous ways--through adoption, high-tech medical procedures and surrogacy--each with challenges and obstacles. In "Parents at Last," Cynthia V.N. Peck and Wendy Wilkinson, both parents who adopted children, explore parenting through the narratives of 32 couples and singles who have created these nontraditional families. While "celebrating adoption and the new pathways to parenthood" through text and photographs, the book (Clarkson Potter, $27.
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