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NEWS
November 12, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Cancer is by nature unfair, capriciously stalking children and grandparents, corporate presidents and clerks, super athletes and shut-ins. Still, there is a sense that this most feared of afflictions is an act of fate, rather than anyone's fault. The same cannot be said, however, for the access to cancer treatment. Too often, patients are left to their own devices in the search for the best possible medical care, cancer experts and patient advocates say.
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NEWS
April 9, 2002 | From Times wire services
At least 90% of large U.S. hospitals with more than 300 beds operate at or over capacity for treating patients and sometimes have to divert ambulances to other hospitals, a survey reported Monday. The finding suggests that many emergency rooms are unable to handle even the day-to-day stresses, let alone any big emergencies, experts say.
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NEWS
April 9, 2002 | From Times wire services
At least 90% of large U.S. hospitals with more than 300 beds operate at or over capacity for treating patients and sometimes have to divert ambulances to other hospitals, a survey reported Monday. The finding suggests that many emergency rooms are unable to handle even the day-to-day stresses, let alone any big emergencies, experts say.
NEWS
August 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked hospitals nationwide Friday to review their laboratory procedures after a deadly error at a Philadelphia hospital. St. Agnes Medical Center incorrectly interpreted a test used to measure blood clotting, leading dozens of patients to receive overdoses of a blood thinner. Two people died as a result, the city medical examiner ruled. The lab error involved the prothrombin time (PT) test, which measures blood thickness.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1989 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick J. Frawley Jr. has had a diverse career. He started in the import-export business, ran a company that makes ballpoint pens, chaired the Schick Safety Razor Co. and another concern that makes movie prints. He is also a wealthy man and recently sold one of his Holmby Hills estates to television producer Aaron Spelling. But for the last 20 years, Frawley, 65, now chairman and president of Frawley Corp. in Studio City, has had a one-track mind.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Griffey, a lobbyist for hospitals affiliated with Protestant churches, went out of his way to play golf at Andrews Air Force Base during the closed-door budget summit there recently so that he could bend the ears of a few budget negotiators from the White House and Congress who were otherwise sealed off from reporters and lobbyists. "It worked, I got to talk to them," Griffey said. "They were happy to see a familiar face."
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Millions of medical devices that come in contact with blood or other body fluids and are supposed to be discarded after one use are instead being reprocessed and reused, putting other patients at risk without their knowledge, some experts fear. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is poised to crack down on the largely unregulated practice, which is escalating because managed care reimbursements are not sufficient to cover the costs of new devices.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1994 | THOMAS MAIER, NEWSDAY
Once-secret report cards issued to 11,000 U.S. hospitals, nursing homes and other health providers will gradually be made public, starting this week. Previously, the detailed performance reports prepared every three years by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations remained confidential. The agency would say only whether an institution was accredited.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many hospitals in the nation are testing admitted patients for AIDS without their knowledge or consent, in some cases in violation of hospital policies or state laws, according to preliminary results from new research released Thursday. The majority of 500 hospitals studied maintained that they always informed patients before testing, said Dr. Charles E. Lewis, professor of medicine at UCLA and an author of the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A 1983 change in the method of paying hospitals under Medicare "did not interrupt" a long-term trend toward better hospital care for the nation's elderly, according to an extensive study by researchers at the Santa Monica-based RAND Corp. and UCLA Medical Center. But the team, led by Dr. Katherine L. Kahn and Dr. Robert H.
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the great hospitals of the nation's major cities and ballooning suburbs, ambulances are being turned away and patients are stacked in hallways like so much cordwood. America's dwindling capacity for emergency care is being outstripped by Americans' demand for it. And this time the victims are not just the poor, who have suffered for decades at the country's cash-strapped public hospitals. This time the danger threatens almost anybody who suddenly takes ill or sustains a traumatic injury.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A prominent health care organization warned U.S. hospitals Wednesday to watch out for the return of a rare but preventable type of brain damage in newborns that has been on the rise with shorter hospital stays and increased breast-feeding. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, a health care accrediting group, issued an alert to 5,000 U.S. hospitals about kernicterus, a highly unusual condition that stems from severe jaundice.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Doctors, not the military or police, will have to protect the public after a bioterrorist attack, but not one hospital in the nation is prepared, an expert warned Thursday. Anthrax bacteria released in a small shopping mall could cause a crisis requiring 2,600 intensive-care beds, a number "not available anywhere in the country," said Dr. Michael Osterholm, who runs the Infection Control Advisory Network and frequently advises the government on public health issues.
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In response to growing concerns over the safety of disposable medical devices that are reprocessed for reuse, the U.S. government Monday proposed highly anticipated measures to more strictly regulate the practice. The Times last summer reported that millions of medical devices that come in contact with blood or other body fluids and are supposed to be discarded after one use are, instead, reprocessed and reused in other patients without their knowledge.
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Millions of medical devices that come in contact with blood or other body fluids and are supposed to be discarded after one use are instead being reprocessed and reused, putting other patients at risk without their knowledge, some experts fear. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is poised to crack down on the largely unregulated practice, which is escalating because managed care reimbursements are not sufficient to cover the costs of new devices.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1999 | Reuters
U.S. not-for-profit hospitals will suffer more bankruptcies and defaults over the next several years, and large urban facilities are no longer immune, Moody's Investors Service said. "We expect more bankruptcy filings to occur as hospitals are unable to make bond payments and seek relief from creditors," said Lisa Goldstein, an analyst at Moody's and author of a new report on the problem.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration may try to slash Medicare spending by $20 billion over the next five years, a move that would jeopardize already struggling hospitals around the country, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) said Monday. Bentsen, whose home state of Texas has led the country in the number of hospital failures since 1986, said that about half of the reduction under consideration would come at the expense of hospitals.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Community Psychiatric Centers Inc., the latest victim of the troubled psychiatric care industry, said Friday that its third-quarter earnings plunged 98%. In heavy New York Stock Exchange trading, its share price sank 27% on the news. The Laguna Hills-based company blamed its dismal performance on pricing pressures and millions of dollars in uncollected bills. In addition, the company ratcheted down its offer to buy two Texas-based hospital companies, Healthcare International Inc.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
New mothers are staying in the hospital a little longer--about half a day more on average--says the first study since a public outcry over "drive-by deliveries." Doctors say first-time mothers often need a second day compared to more experienced mothers. In 1980, the nation's average stay for a vaginal delivery was 3.2 days. That dropped to 1.7 days by 1995, but inched up to 2.1 days by 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported. In 1995, 1.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven-month-old Sydney Litzsinger was bleeding. She'd fallen on a plastic Barbie doll bed and cut her upper lip down to the muscle. The family rushed Sydney to the emergency room at nearby West Hills Hospital, where a doctor scrambled to find a specialist to sew up her face. But to no avail. Every one of the specialists called refused to come in to treat the baby. It didn't matter that her family had insurance.
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