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Hospitals Vietnam

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BUSINESS
April 8, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County development company said Wednesday that it has signed an agreement with the government of Vietnam to build fully equipped hospitals in that nation's two largest cities. Huntington Beach First Choice Realty & Investments Inc., through an international subsidiary, plans to start building the two 80-bed hospitals as soon as relations are normalized between the United States and Vietnam.
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BUSINESS
April 8, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County development company said Wednesday that it has signed an agreement with the government of Vietnam to build fully equipped hospitals in that nation's two largest cities. Huntington Beach First Choice Realty & Investments Inc., through an international subsidiary, plans to start building the two 80-bed hospitals as soon as relations are normalized between the United States and Vietnam.
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NEWS
October 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven U.S. veterans inaugurated a health clinic in Yen Vien, Vietnam, an area northwest of Hanoi devastated by American bombs in 1972. The veterans worked with local Vietnamese to build the clinic, financed by a $34,000 donation from the California-based Veterans' Vietnam Restoration Project. The veterans, six men and a woman, said they helped build the clinic on the site of a hospital destroyed by bombs to heal psychological wounds lingering from the Vietnam War.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she looks into the eyes of Vietnamese street children, many of them beaten, raped or abandoned, Christina Noble sees herself. When they swarm around her in Ho Chi Minh City, hustling spare change and desperate for food, she remembers what it was like. "I've known it, because it's my story too," says Noble. "Kids should never experience that horror on the streets, and yet the world ignores them. I've made it my business not to."
NEWS
February 12, 1989
A group of former U.S. soldiers, hoping to "deliver an olive branch of peace," have begin to build a medical clinic in rural Vietnam, the Veterans-Vietnam Restoration Project announced. Although a number of veterans' groups have returned to Vietnam for visits, the clinic at Vung Tau in southern Vietnam is the first known development effort by former U.S. servicemen.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she looks into the eyes of Vietnamese street children, many of them beaten, raped or abandoned, Christina Noble sees herself. When they swarm around her in Ho Chi Minh City, hustling spare change and desperate for food, she remembers what it was like. "I've known it, because it's my story too," says Noble. "Kids should never experience that horror on the streets, and yet the world ignores them. I've made it my business not to."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
Thirty-three years after the Vietnam War ended, the fallen country of South Vietnam lives on -- in the streets of Orange County's Little Saigon and in the minds of thousands of refugees who fled communist forces and rebuilt their lives here. The memories of hardship are still so bitter for some that they continue to mount street protests, fly the South Vietnamese flag from businesses and lampposts, and rail against communism on radio talk shows.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some leaders of Orange County's Vietnamese community are wary of President Clinton's plan to open trade with their homeland, saying they want assurances that lifting the embargo will be tied to a promise of improved civil liberties in Vietnam. Some residents and politicians worry that the United States is bowing too quickly to a former enemy. Others, namely in the business community, welcome the prospect of a new market overseas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1994 | THUAN LE, Thuan Le is a staff writer for The Times' Orange County edition
I was only 8 when my family left Saigon in 1975, and I was too young to comprehend the war around me. But in the last two years, I have begun to comprehend the Vietnam War and its aftermath in ways I had never expected. It happened by accident when I heard about Oliver Stone's new film on Vietnam and ended up with a major role in it.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Political Writer
The 38th Congressional District, whose voters will choose Tuesday between incumbent Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) and Assemblyman Richard Robinson (D-Garden Grove), is the urban core of Orange County. Within its 90 square miles, stretching from Santa Ana to Cerritos in southeast Los Angeles County, there are more than 18,300 businesses, three shopping malls and 12 Catholic parishes.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven U.S. veterans inaugurated a health clinic in Yen Vien, Vietnam, an area northwest of Hanoi devastated by American bombs in 1972. The veterans worked with local Vietnamese to build the clinic, financed by a $34,000 donation from the California-based Veterans' Vietnam Restoration Project. The veterans, six men and a woman, said they helped build the clinic on the site of a hospital destroyed by bombs to heal psychological wounds lingering from the Vietnam War.
NEWS
February 12, 1989
A group of former U.S. soldiers, hoping to "deliver an olive branch of peace," have begin to build a medical clinic in rural Vietnam, the Veterans-Vietnam Restoration Project announced. Although a number of veterans' groups have returned to Vietnam for visits, the clinic at Vung Tau in southern Vietnam is the first known development effort by former U.S. servicemen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Political Writer
The 38th Congressional District, whose voters will choose Nov. 4 between Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) and Assemblyman Richard Robinson (D-Garden Grove), is the urban core of Orange County. Within its 90 square miles, stretching from Santa Ana to Cerritos, there are more than 18,300 businesses, three shopping malls and 12 Catholic parishes.
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