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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2000 | Associated Press
An emerging conflict over sterilization is getting new scrutiny from American Catholic bishops and could threaten vital health care partnerships that depend on the church, some observers say. The debate coincides with a recent buying spree among Catholic-sponsored health care networks, which support the church's rejection of birth control. Often they have merged with nonreligious hospitals that routinely perform sterilizations as a form of birth control.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2008 | Andrew Blankstein
State regulators have fined Cedars-Sinai Medical Center $25,000 in connection with a series of safety lapses in which incorrect doses of the blood-thinner heparin were given to children, including the newborn twins of actor Dennis Quaid and his wife. Cedars was one of 11 California hospitals assessed penalties because of license violations that caused, or were likely to cause, serious injury or death, said Kathleen Billings- ley, deputy director of the state Department of Public Health's Center for Healthcare Quality.
OPINION
November 17, 1991
Re "Hospitals Caught in Cross-Fire," Nov. 4: I would like to commend you on bringing to light a little known fact that is threatening the very lives of the people who are staffing hospitals and particularly emergency rooms across this nation in urban as well as rural areas. As our society continues to follow a state of entropy, the community that is served by the health care system must rally to protect the personnel and the institutions that are there year-round, day after day helping those who are sick and injured, alleviating their pain and suffering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Evan Halper
A proposal is sitting on the governor's desk that would smack state hospitals with billions of dollars in new fees -- and hospital officials are begging Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to sign it into law. In fact, they thought it up. In the latest test of anti-tax groups' clout in the Capitol, however, fiscal conservatives are trying to persuade the governor to block the new levies on the institutions that want them. At the root of the dispute is a plan by the hospitals to access $2 billion in federal funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Two on-duty nurses were stabbed in separate incidents at Los Angeles-area hospitals Sunday, leaving one of them hospitalized in critical condition, according to the L.A. County Sheriff's Department. The first stabbing occurred at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar at around 2 a.m., when a man entered the hospital, made his way past a weapons screening area and into the building. Sheriff's deputies searching for him heard a scream that led them to the victim, a female nurse who'd been stabbed in the upper body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
A "virus" infected computers at three Michigan hospitals last fall and disrupted patient diagnosis at two of the centers in what appears to be the first such invasion of a medical computer, it was reported last week. The infiltration did not harm any patients but delayed diagnoses by shutting down computers, creating files of nonexistent patients and garbling names on patient records, which could have caused more serious problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1987
The nurse's worst enemy is herself. It is a poor self-image as well as a failure to mobilize that prevents the nurse from commanding the professional status that she deserves. Nurses are grossly underpaid. The average Los Angeles hospital staff nurse earns about $12 an hour. Thus the life and death responsibilities of a nurse are rewarded comparatively to the tasks of a receptionist or grocery store clerk. Added to low wages are horrendous hours with little control over work scheduling.
OPINION
November 21, 2006
Re "L.A. files patient 'dumping' charges," Nov. 16 I'm not at all surprised by the patient "dumping" stories. This has been going on for years. Nonpublic hospitals regularly release patients who lack health insurance before they are ready, or don't admit them to the hospital when they should. As a staff physician at a free clinic, I frequently see patients who were either released from the hospital too early or not admitted when they should have been. What we should be looking at is not that these patients get a free ride to the shelter, but that they weren't cared for appropriately in the first place.
OPINION
December 20, 1987
Hospital mortality rates for Medicare patients for 1986 have now been published by the Health Care Finance Administration, stirring debate and controversy. Good. There are risks to this venture--the greatest that the data will be misused by persons who do not take the time to understand what the figures mean, and their limitations. One conspicuous limitation, for example, is that they do not take account of the severity of illness of those who die. Dr. William L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989
I read the article about UCI Medical Center (March 14) and just couldn't believe it. I realize that a large percentage of their patients can't pay, but that isn't all the problem. I can't imagine how all these great minds can't look at the situation and see some of the things untrained people see. We are the consumer. Their rates are outrageous, starting with the emergency room. Other hospitals have had to put together programs to keep costs down and attract patients. People are shopping around more because our insurance companies make us. Most of us have to have pre-admission authorization.
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