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OPINION
November 17, 1991
Re "Hospitals Caught in Cross-Fire," Nov. 4: I would like to commend you on bringing to light a little known fact that is threatening the very lives of the people who are staffing hospitals and particularly emergency rooms across this nation in urban as well as rural areas. As our society continues to follow a state of entropy, the community that is served by the health care system must rally to protect the personnel and the institutions that are there year-round, day after day helping those who are sick and injured, alleviating their pain and suffering.
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NEWS
September 2, 2010
Flu season may be a bad time to check into a California hospital--and probably everywhere else in the country as well. In a demonstration of what many experts would call appalling medical ethics, only slightly more than half of healthcare workers in California hospitals received a flu shot last year, despite the dangers that presents for patients. The vaccination rate was less than 25% in 3.3% of the hospitals, according to data compiled by the state health department and obtained by Consumers Union through a Public Records Act request.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Tony Perry
The incident that led to 22 elementary school students in San Diego being sent to hospitals  Thursday with stomach pains began with some fourth-grade tomfoolery, district officials said Friday. Some may not have been sick at all, officials said. A "dare" had circulated among the fourth-graders at Audubon Elementary School before lunch: let's see how much food you can stuff into a drink. Among the things stuffed into drinks: carrots, salt, pepper and hot sauce. After lunch, several students complained of belly aches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
A "virus" infected computers at three Michigan hospitals last fall and disrupted patient diagnosis at two of the centers in what appears to be the first such invasion of a medical computer, it was reported last week. The infiltration did not harm any patients but delayed diagnoses by shutting down computers, creating files of nonexistent patients and garbling names on patient records, which could have caused more serious problems.
OPINION
July 26, 2009
Re "A sick waste of money," Editorial, July 18 It's hard to imagine a worse time to support a new tax on hospitals, but The Times has managed to do just that. This new tax -- which The Times calls a fee -- will be passed through to patients with private health coverage or who pay out of pocket, and will exacerbate our already out-of-control healthcare costs. Less than six weeks ago, California voters sent a clear signal: no more taxes. The Times' ill-considered endorsement of a proposed hospital tax (AB 1383 by Assemblyman Dave Jones)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2009 | Evan Halper
A proposal is sitting on the governor's desk that would smack state hospitals with billions of dollars in new fees -- and hospital officials are begging Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to sign it into law. In fact, they thought it up. In the latest test of anti-tax groups' clout in the Capitol, however, fiscal conservatives are trying to persuade the governor to block the new levies on the institutions that want them. At the root of the dispute is a plan by the hospitals to access $2 billion in federal funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1987
The nurse's worst enemy is herself. It is a poor self-image as well as a failure to mobilize that prevents the nurse from commanding the professional status that she deserves. Nurses are grossly underpaid. The average Los Angeles hospital staff nurse earns about $12 an hour. Thus the life and death responsibilities of a nurse are rewarded comparatively to the tasks of a receptionist or grocery store clerk. Added to low wages are horrendous hours with little control over work scheduling.
OPINION
November 21, 2006
Re "L.A. files patient 'dumping' charges," Nov. 16 I'm not at all surprised by the patient "dumping" stories. This has been going on for years. Nonpublic hospitals regularly release patients who lack health insurance before they are ready, or don't admit them to the hospital when they should. As a staff physician at a free clinic, I frequently see patients who were either released from the hospital too early or not admitted when they should have been. What we should be looking at is not that these patients get a free ride to the shelter, but that they weren't cared for appropriately in the first place.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
Might we see iPads popping up in the hands of hospital staff? Well, it depends. Ottawa Hospital in Canada, is distributing hundreds of iPads to doctors and nurses to view X-ray and MRI images and access other medication information, according to "The electronic health record meets the iPad" posted by IT World Canada. However Dr. Satish Misra, writing earlier this year for iMedical Apps, expressed concerns about the use of iPads in hospitals: Can they be properly disinfected?
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Last year, the good folks at Soliant Health -- a healthcare staffing firm -- took it upon themselves to rank the 20 most beautiful hospitals in the country. The list was subjective, of course, but the judges clearly put some thought into their selections. Check out the Cinderella-castle quality of No. 1 pick Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore; the one-acre rooftop garden at No. 6 St. Louis Children's Hospital; the lodge motif at No. 10 Mat-Su Regional Medical Center in Palmer, Alaska; and the hotel feel of No. 17, Sacred Heart Medical Center in Springfield, Ore. This year, Soliant asked readers of its blog to nominate and vote for the country's most beautiful hospitals.
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