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Hostages Armenia

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NEWS
March 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Troops of the former Soviet army became further embroiled in the bitter territorial conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan when Armenian militants threatened to kill 10 captured officers unless the army turns over a huge quantity of arms and ammunition. Maj. Gen. Nikolai Stolyarov warned in Moscow that the military, now the unified armed forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States, will attack the Armenian town of Artik unless the officers are released unharmed.
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NEWS
October 29, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing retribution for the slaying of eight top political leaders, Armenian officials Thursday announced that they were seeking terrorism charges that could carry the death penalty against five gunmen who surrendered after attacking the parliament and holding hostages overnight. Armenian President Robert Kocharyan proclaimed three days of national mourning that will begin today and end with the burial of victims from Wednesday's slaughter in the capital, Yerevan.
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NEWS
October 29, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vowing retribution for the slaying of eight top political leaders, Armenian officials Thursday announced that they were seeking terrorism charges that could carry the death penalty against five gunmen who surrendered after attacking the parliament and holding hostages overnight. Armenian President Robert Kocharyan proclaimed three days of national mourning that will begin today and end with the burial of victims from Wednesday's slaughter in the capital, Yerevan.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gunmen invaded the Armenian parliament Wednesday and shot to death the prime minister and at least three other officials, plunging the small landlocked former Soviet republic into a political crisis. The gunmen were still holding more than 50 hostages in the parliament early today. The assailants initially demanded to make a statement on television or radio; later reports said they were seeking a helicopter. The takeover began about 5:15 p.m.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gunmen invaded the Armenian parliament Wednesday and shot to death the prime minister and at least three other officials, plunging the small landlocked former Soviet republic into a political crisis. The gunmen were still holding more than 50 hostages in the parliament early today. The assailants initially demanded to make a statement on television or radio; later reports said they were seeking a helicopter. The takeover began about 5:15 p.m.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten officers of the former Soviet Army were released by their Armenian captors early this morning, a spokesman for the Armed Forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States said. The Armenian militants had held them hostage for four days, demanding ammunition for their battle against Azerbaijanis in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region. "According to our information, no arms or ammunition have been given to the captors in exchange for the hostages," Vladimir S.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | HUDSON SANGREE and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As political turmoil exploded in Armenia on Wednesday, members of Southern California's large Armenian community were saddened and stunned by events threatening the small nation. From parks in Glendale to the Armenian Consulate on the Westside, at businesses in Norwalk and Newport Beach, people were taken aback by the news that gunmen had opened fire in the parliament building in Armenia's capital, Yerevan, killing Prime Minister Vazgen Sarkisyan and other officials.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | HUDSON SANGREE and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As political turmoil exploded in Armenia on Wednesday, members of Southern California's large Armenian community were saddened and stunned by events threatening the small nation. From parks in Glendale to the Armenian Consulate on the Westside, at businesses in Norwalk and Newport Beach, people were taken aback by the news that gunmen had opened fire in the parliament building in Armenia's capital, Yerevan, killing Prime Minister Vazgen Sarkisyan and other officials.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten officers of the former Soviet Army were released by their Armenian captors early this morning, a spokesman for the Armed Forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States said. The Armenian militants had held them hostage for four days, demanding ammunition for their battle against Azerbaijanis in the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region. "According to our information, no arms or ammunition have been given to the captors in exchange for the hostages," Vladimir S.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Troops of the former Soviet army became further embroiled in the bitter territorial conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan when Armenian militants threatened to kill 10 captured officers unless the army turns over a huge quantity of arms and ammunition. Maj. Gen. Nikolai Stolyarov warned in Moscow that the military, now the unified armed forces of the Commonwealth of Independent States, will attack the Armenian town of Artik unless the officers are released unharmed.
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