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Hostages Germany

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July 28, 1996 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sanctity and serenity of the Olympic Games were split early in the morning of Sept. 5, 1972, when Palestinian commandos, some dressed as athletes, scaled an eight-foot wire fence in the Olympic athletes' village at Munich, carrying bags stuffed with submachine guns. The eight men advanced on Building 31, which housed the men in the Israeli delegation. At 4:55 a.m. Moshe Weinberg, the Israeli wrestling coach, answered a knock on his door.
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NEWS
July 28, 1996 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sanctity and serenity of the Olympic Games were split early in the morning of Sept. 5, 1972, when Palestinian commandos, some dressed as athletes, scaled an eight-foot wire fence in the Olympic athletes' village at Munich, carrying bags stuffed with submachine guns. The eight men advanced on Building 31, which housed the men in the Israeli delegation. At 4:55 a.m. Moshe Weinberg, the Israeli wrestling coach, answered a knock on his door.
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NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Commandos overpowered one of Germany's most notorious criminals and freed seven relatives that he had threatened to kill during a daylong ordeal in a rural village. Norbert Hagner, 45, had spent 11 years in jail for bank robberies and kidnappings in the 1970s and '80s that netted about $2.7 million. He was freed in 1994. Local newspapers said Hagner had returned seeking revenge on his ex-wife for allegedly tipping off police about a robbery he committed in 1981.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Commandos overpowered one of Germany's most notorious criminals and freed seven relatives that he had threatened to kill during a daylong ordeal in a rural village. Norbert Hagner, 45, had spent 11 years in jail for bank robberies and kidnappings in the 1970s and '80s that netted about $2.7 million. He was freed in 1994. Local newspapers said Hagner had returned seeking revenge on his ex-wife for allegedly tipping off police about a robbery he committed in 1981.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Freed British hostage John McCarthy on Saturday paid tribute to his former fellow prisoners in Lebanon, then left the British air base where he spent eight days recovering after more than five years in captivity. "My greatest hope is to continue our friendship in freedom together," the 34-year-old TV producer said in a farewell before leaving the Royal Air Force base at Lyneham. "I hope (it) will be soon."
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Champ, Muhammad Ali, rose slowly from his table in the Scheherazade Lounge and feinted a one-two combination at the 5-foot-2 Indian barman. The little fellow never flinched. He stood stolidly, proudly, as the big American wrapped an arm around his shoulder, eased a small smile and faced the Al Rashid hotel photographer. Flash. One more memory for the Al Rashid staff, which lined up one by one Wednesday night for the honor of posing with the Champ.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG
Listen to the words of a man who has come to know George Bush well during these most trying moments. "Those eyes are scary. Very calm. Very cool. You look at his eyes--there is an angry man there, and every week I think he gets more angry. We say: 'Don't make a quiet man angry, because he's really hard to handle.' " Now, another look at the President of the United States: It is 5:30 on a morning in late August. He is adrift in a dinghy on the marshes of the Kennebunk River, out behind the Old Grist Mill restaurant in his beloved Kennebunkport, Me. Casting lure after lure in an unsuccessful campaign to snare a bass, he seems impervious to frustration--be it elusive fish, hungry mosquito, or Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Freed British hostage John McCarthy on Saturday paid tribute to his former fellow prisoners in Lebanon, then left the British air base where he spent eight days recovering after more than five years in captivity. "My greatest hope is to continue our friendship in freedom together," the 34-year-old TV producer said in a farewell before leaving the Royal Air Force base at Lyneham. "I hope (it) will be soon."
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