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December 15, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling them "victorious" and heroic, Secretary of State James A. Baker III welcomed back U.S. diplomats from Kuwait city and the last group of American and Canadian hostages from Kuwait and Iraq on Friday at Andrews Air Force Base. Ambassador W. Nathaniel Howell III, who along with a skeleton staff had withstood threats and deprivation to keep open the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait, declared that "we could do nothing else" but hold firm in the besieged compound until the last Americans were freed.
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NEWS
June 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. government has given families of Americans held hostage in Iraq, Kuwait and Lebanon more than $2.5 million in cash payments and life and health insurance under a little-known benefits program. None of the names of the recipients were released by the State Department, which cited the Privacy Act. A total of 381 families received $1,721,9l8 in salary compensation, 258 families were given $36,923 for life insurance payments and 290 received $766,933 for health insurance.
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NEWS
November 28, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American banker, one of three U.S. hostages freed Tuesday by Iraq, said a U.N. resolution authorizing military action in the Persian Gulf crisis could shatter the spirits of those left behind. John Stevenson, who was held as a so-called human shield at a potential military target in Iraq, told reporters on arrival here that the hostages' morale "is already bad enough." If the Security Council adopts the resolution, Stevenson said, "this just deepens it."
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of oil rigs and refineries that had become his home in Iraq, Gene Lovas grew accustomed to on-the-job hazards. Now, as Lovas prepares to leave his family to return to work in the region where he had been a hostage at the U.S. Embassy until just three months ago, he adds mine fields, environmental perils and the constant threat of renewed violence to the list. Still, Lovas, a construction superintendent from Westminster, downplays the risk.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Family members of American hostages in Iraq say they are deeply torn by President Saddam Hussein's offer to let them visit their loved ones over Christmas--revolted by the obvious attempt at manipulation but desperate to bring some comfort as best they can. "It may be the women's last chance to see their husbands," said Leslie Kern, a Columbus, Ohio, psychologist who has organized a voluntary nationwide counseling service for families of American hostages in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Praying for the men they left behind, 171 American women and children flew to safety from Kuwait on Friday, bringing surreal tales of brutality and courage, of fear, love and absurdity in the ruins of the Iraqi-occupied oil sheikdom. A U.S.-chartered Iraqi Airways Boeing 707 called at Baghdad en route to Amman to inaugurate an air bridge that is expected to operate daily in repatriating the estimated 1,400 American women and children trapped in Kuwait since the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the families of hundreds of Americans who have been held captive since Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, Saddam Hussein's startling announcement Thursday that he will free all foreigners started a day that was rich with joy, yet tempered by suspicion and worry. They will believe it, many said, only when they know their loved ones are safely outside Iraqi-controlled territory. Many wondered exactly how soon the captives would be set free.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John and Michelle Richert spent the last 4 1/2 months in Kuwait, and they were terrified. In a country they had considered home, the Richerts made a fragile fortress out of a second-floor apartment by covering the windows with blankets and sealing the doors with towels to block noise. They had heard too often about fellow Westerners dragged into the streets by Iraqi soldiers. "Try to imagine keeping a burglar out of your apartment 24 hours a day," said Michelle Richert on Friday.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Western European nations toughened their stand against Iraq politically and militarily on Tuesday, with four more countries pledging to send warships to the Persian Gulf region and Britain ruling out negotiations for the release of Western hostages. Rallying around the hostage issue, the governments of the nine members of the Western European Union met in emergency session in Paris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1991 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an occupation army, the Iraqis showed military strength and "naked brutality"--but not much smarts, former U.S. ambassador to Kuwait W. Nathaniel Howell said Thursday, "They weren't very sophisticated," said Howell, who got an up-close look at the enemy while under siege for 110 days in the American Embassy in Kuwait. "They weren't very efficient."
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The uncertainty of it all, now that was the worst of it. Sitting and waiting for . . . what? Listening to the shortwave radios and hearing about the massive American military buildup in the desert. Being held prisoner at Iraqi military installations and wondering if the bombs really would drop. Waiting in Kuwait city apartments, listening for the knock at the door that would mean an escort north to Baghdad and . . . what? No one knew. No one could predict.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John and Michelle Richert spent the last 4 1/2 months in Kuwait, and they were terrified. In a country they had considered home, the Richerts made a fragile fortress out of a second-floor apartment by covering the windows with blankets and sealing the doors with towels to block noise. They had heard too often about fellow Westerners dragged into the streets by Iraqi soldiers. "Try to imagine keeping a burglar out of your apartment 24 hours a day," said Michelle Richert on Friday.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The waiting and uncertainty ended Monday for one local family upon learning that Awni Younis, a 43-year-old businessman in Kuwait, had safely left the region and is heading home to his wife and children in Orange County. "This is amazing," said Younis' son, Abdullah. "We kept on waiting and waiting. I didn't expect him home until after Christmas." Younis was one of the last people from Orange County known to remain in Kuwait since the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Adams was already asleep when his father-in-law rapped on the bedroom door. Something bad is happening, he said. A late-night newscast had just flashed the bulletin that Iraqi forces had crossed the border and were moving into Kuwait. For Adams, the news could not have been more chilling. He lived in Kuwait city with his wife and two children and was in Houston only because he and his family were on home leave.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling them "victorious" and heroic, Secretary of State James A. Baker III welcomed back U.S. diplomats from Kuwait city and the last group of American and Canadian hostages from Kuwait and Iraq on Friday at Andrews Air Force Base. Ambassador W. Nathaniel Howell III, who along with a skeleton staff had withstood threats and deprivation to keep open the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait, declared that "we could do nothing else" but hold firm in the besieged compound until the last Americans were freed.
NEWS
August 20, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, leaving no doubt that Americans and other Westerners trapped in Iraq and Kuwait are hostages, said Sunday that they would be freed only if U.S. and multinational forces are withdrawn from Saudi Arabia and the economic blockade is lifted.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The latest hostage family from Orange County to be freed from Kuwait is expected to return here this weekend after appearing on ABC's PrimeTime Live on Thursday night. Michelle and John Richert, both 31, came out of hiding last week after Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's decision to release all Westerners.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush adamantly declared Thursday that he will offer Iraqi President Saddam Hussein no reward for letting the hostages go. "Hell, no. Not one thing," he said. At a White House ceremony welcoming seven of the Americans freed from Iraq and Kuwait, Bush added: "You don't reward a kidnaper. You don't reward somebody that has done something that he shouldn't have done in the first place."
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