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Hostages New Caledonia

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NEWS
May 5, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
French security forces freed 23 French hostages in an assault on a remote jungle cave today after a 14-day drama that threw this South Pacific island territory into one of its worst political crises, government officials announced here.
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NEWS
May 31, 1988
French Defense Minister Jean-Pierre Chevenement conceded that some French soldiers exceeded their authority after storming a New Caledonia cave to rescue 21 gendarmes and a state prosecutor held hostage earlier this month. He also said he suspended the officer who was in charge of prisoners taken during the May 8 attack, which resulted in the deaths of 19 Kanak separatists and two soldiers. Among those killed on the island of Ouvea was the alleged ringleader of the kidnaping, Alphonse Dianou.
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NEWS
May 8, 1988
Hundreds of Melanesians demonstrated peacefully in New Caledonia to protest the killing of 19 separatists by French commandos who stormed a cave Thursday and freed 23 French hostages. About 500 police officers lined the streets of Noumea, the capital, during the five-hour march and rally.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Former Premier Jacques Chirac, the defeated conservative candidate in the recent presidential election, ordered a bloody and controversial raid earlier this month on a Melanesian separatist hide-out in New Caledonia mainly in an effort to win votes, Defense Minister Jean-Pierre Chevenement charged Tuesday. "I think that the electoral context weighed heavily on this affair, for the pressure from the premier was intense," Chevenement, a Socialist, said in a television interview.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
French security forces wearing flak vests and armed with automatic rifles took up positions on street corners Tuesday after French loyalists vowed to retaliate against Melanesian separatists in this troubled South Pacific island territory. " Violence ou valise ," declared conservative loyalist leader Justin Guillemard, suggesting that the loyalist majority must either meet the recent wave of separatist violence with violence or pack their bags and leave.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
For the past 11 days and nights, the young Melanesian rebel leader holding 23 French hostages in a cave has not let go of his ax. It is the same ax, French authorities say, that was used to hack three French gendarmes to death when the hostages were seized. Of that, authorities say they are certain, because the young Melanesian has refused to wipe the gendarmes' blood from the ax blade. The blood apparently serves as inspiration for the kidnapers, who the French charge have "the madness of God."
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The cave where separatist Melanesian tribesmen took 23 French hostages at gunpoint 12 days ago is a sacred place, where each leaf has a special meaning, where not even the tribe's women are allowed to enter, where warriors killed a century ago lie buried. And as one of the world's most bizarre and remote hostage dramas ended Thursday, the cave once again became a place of war--and of death.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
A French naval vessel opened fire Saturday on a beachfront encampment of about 30 armed Melanesian separatists in a marked escalation of France's military efforts to defuse the deepening crisis in this South Pacific island territory.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of French paramilitary troops, dressed in T-shirts and swimming suits, sipped beers and swapped jokes at beachfront resorts here Friday as the island's militant Melanesian separatists killed a French loyalist settler 190 miles from the capital and declared that "a colonial war" is raging in this French territory in the South Pacific.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Regional elections in this French-ruled South Pacific territory got under way today despite a demand by Melanesian separatists holding 27 French policemen hostage that the voting be canceled. The kidnapers also demanded that the French government call off a search for the hostages, seized Friday after a bloody attack on a police post on the southern island of Ouvea about 190 miles from Noumea, the New Caledonian capital.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The cave where separatist Melanesian tribesmen took 23 French hostages at gunpoint 12 days ago is a sacred place, where each leaf has a special meaning, where not even the tribe's women are allowed to enter, where warriors killed a century ago lie buried. And as one of the world's most bizarre and remote hostage dramas ended Thursday, the cave once again became a place of war--and of death.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
French security forces freed 23 French hostages in an assault on a remote jungle cave today after a 14-day drama that threw this South Pacific island territory into one of its worst political crises, government officials announced here.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
French security forces wearing flak vests and armed with automatic rifles took up positions on street corners Tuesday after French loyalists vowed to retaliate against Melanesian separatists in this troubled South Pacific island territory. " Violence ou valise ," declared conservative loyalist leader Justin Guillemard, suggesting that the loyalist majority must either meet the recent wave of separatist violence with violence or pack their bags and leave.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
For the past 11 days and nights, the young Melanesian rebel leader holding 23 French hostages in a cave has not let go of his ax. It is the same ax, French authorities say, that was used to hack three French gendarmes to death when the hostages were seized. Of that, authorities say they are certain, because the young Melanesian has refused to wipe the gendarmes' blood from the ax blade. The blood apparently serves as inspiration for the kidnapers, who the French charge have "the madness of God."
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Melanesian separatists declared Sunday that 23 French hostages they have been holding since last month in a heavily fortified cave are now considered "prisoners of war." The separatists' leaders called on the United Nations to send an independent commission to investigate what it calls "France's colonial war" in this South Pacific island territory.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
A French naval vessel opened fire Saturday on a beachfront encampment of about 30 armed Melanesian separatists in a marked escalation of France's military efforts to defuse the deepening crisis in this South Pacific island territory.
NEWS
April 28, 1988
A French judge and seven policemen, including the leader of France's elite anti-terrorist squad, were taken hostage and held in a cave by Melanesian separatists in New Caledonia when they tried to negotiate the release of 15 officers captured earlier by tribesmen demanding independence from France, authorities said in Noumea. The hostage-taking occurred as Paris dispatched about 250 marines to New Caledonia to control the uprising that began last week.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of French paramilitary troops, dressed in T-shirts and swimming suits, sipped beers and swapped jokes at beachfront resorts here Friday as the island's militant Melanesian separatists killed a French loyalist settler 190 miles from the capital and declared that "a colonial war" is raging in this French territory in the South Pacific.
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