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Hostages Panama

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NEWS
December 28, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vatican's representative in Panama City has granted authority to the U.S. Army to free any embassy employees who might be taken hostage by former Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega or others who have taken refuge in the Vatican's embassy there, according to a document obtained by The Times. One U.S. official interpreted the authorization as an invitation to the U.S. military to seize Noriega, who took refuge in the embassy on Christmas Eve.
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NEWS
December 30, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond Dragseth, an American college science teacher, was kidnaped and executed by Panamanian army units in the early hours of the U.S. invasion of Panama, according to American officials and family members. The body of the 47-year-old faculty member of Panama Canal College was exhumed Friday from a common grave in a public cemetery. He had been shot in the back of the head.
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NEWS
December 22, 1989
The Fighting U.S. troops, completing the conquest of Panama's military bases, moved into the streets of Panama City to root out members of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's paramilitary Dignity Battalions and end the chaos that has racked the capital. Noriega remained at large, possibly in the countryside. Law and Order Guillermo Endara, the opposition leader installed as president just before the U.S.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vatican's representative in Panama City has granted authority to the U.S. Army to free any embassy employees who might be taken hostage by former Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega or others who have taken refuge in the Vatican's embassy there, according to a document obtained by The Times. One U.S. official interpreted the authorization as an invitation to the U.S. military to seize Noriega, who took refuge in the embassy on Christmas Eve.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | Times Staff Writer
Pro-Noriega forces Saturday freed two American hostages here. They are Jon Meyersohn, a CBS News producer seized Wednesday at the Marriott Hotel, and American businessman Doug Mullen, a GTE executive who was captured along with Meyersohn. Meyersohn's disappearance had been a subject of rising concern. There had been no earlier reports of Mullen's captivity.
NEWS
December 21, 1989
The Fighting U.S. troops captured or dispersed most members of the Panama Defense Forces, but fighting continued through the day. Panamanian leader Manuel A. Noriega remained in hiding. The United States offered $1 million for information leading to his capture. Washington President Bush said in a televised address that he ordered American troops into action "to protect the lives of American citizens in Panama and bring Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega to justice in the United States."
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | KENNETH FREED and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Armed bands said by U.S. military officials to be directed by ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega staged a bloody attack Friday in downtown Panama City near the American military headquarters and frustrated efforts by U.S. troops to pacify this city. Firing mortars, machine guns and automatic rifles, the attackers hit Panama's national police headquarters, less than a mile from the headquarters of the U.S. Southern Command, about 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First came American gunships, thundering through the night, pounding their way toward the strongman's lair. On loudspeakers, crews shouted to residents around army headquarters: Evacuate! From wooden homes in the slums surrounding Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's Panama Defense Forces compound in Panama City, men, women and children scurried out into the streets, fear in their eyes, the first refugees of the fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1989 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
The U.S. invasion of Panama had barely begun. And soldiers from embattled Gen. Manuel Noriega's super-loyal "dignity battalion" knew just where to go. They headed for the Cesar Park Marriott, the hotel where Americans--many of them journalists--tend to stay in Panama City. Armed with AK-47 attack rifles, the uniformed men chased ABC television producer Robert Campos, CBS producer Jon Meyersohn and others through the hotel, finally cornering them as they emerged from an elevator.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Torn by the invasion of American troops, the capital of Panama erupted into chaos Thursday as panic, gunfire and lawlessness swept the city. Because the Panamanian army, which doubled as domestic police, had fallen in defeat, roving gangs of thugs--many of them loyalists of strongman Manuel A. Noriega--took to the streets, terrorizing countrymen and foreigners alike.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | From United Press International
A veteran CBS News producer on Sunday recounted his harrowing ordeal during three days of captivity in the hands of irregular Panamanian soldiers loyal to deposed dictator Manuel A. Noriega. CBS Evening News producer Jon Meyersohn, 33, told reporters at a news conference how he was handcuffed by militiamen armed with high-powered weapons and grenades and dragged to several hide-outs before his release was finally arranged by another captive, Douglas Mullen, and a third man.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | Times Staff Writer
Pro-Noriega forces Saturday freed two American hostages here. They are Jon Meyersohn, a CBS News producer seized Wednesday at the Marriott Hotel, and American businessman Doug Mullen, a GTE executive who was captured along with Meyersohn. Meyersohn's disappearance had been a subject of rising concern. There had been no earlier reports of Mullen's captivity.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | KENNETH FREED and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Armed bands said by U.S. military officials to be directed by ousted dictator Manuel A. Noriega staged a bloody attack Friday in downtown Panama City near the American military headquarters and frustrated efforts by U.S. troops to pacify this city. Firing mortars, machine guns and automatic rifles, the attackers hit Panama's national police headquarters, less than a mile from the headquarters of the U.S. Southern Command, about 11:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1989 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
The U.S. invasion of Panama had barely begun. And soldiers from embattled Gen. Manuel Noriega's super-loyal "dignity battalion" knew just where to go. They headed for the Cesar Park Marriott, the hotel where Americans--many of them journalists--tend to stay in Panama City. Armed with AK-47 attack rifles, the uniformed men chased ABC television producer Robert Campos, CBS producer Jon Meyersohn and others through the hotel, finally cornering them as they emerged from an elevator.
NEWS
December 22, 1989
The Fighting U.S. troops, completing the conquest of Panama's military bases, moved into the streets of Panama City to root out members of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's paramilitary Dignity Battalions and end the chaos that has racked the capital. Noriega remained at large, possibly in the countryside. Law and Order Guillermo Endara, the opposition leader installed as president just before the U.S.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Torn by the invasion of American troops, the capital of Panama erupted into chaos Thursday as panic, gunfire and lawlessness swept the city. Because the Panamanian army, which doubled as domestic police, had fallen in defeat, roving gangs of thugs--many of them loyalists of strongman Manuel A. Noriega--took to the streets, terrorizing countrymen and foreigners alike.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raymond Dragseth, an American college science teacher, was kidnaped and executed by Panamanian army units in the early hours of the U.S. invasion of Panama, according to American officials and family members. The body of the 47-year-old faculty member of Panama Canal College was exhumed Friday from a common grave in a public cemetery. He had been shot in the back of the head.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
ABC's Peter Jennings called it "hotel reporting." We got it from China last June when many Western journalists, their freedom of movement severely restricted in Beijing, were forced to observe the crackdown of pro-reform dissidents from their hotel rooms overlooking Tian An Men Square. And now, as Jennings noted Wednesday morning, it was happening again.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Thursday that an undetermined number of Americans may be held hostage in Panama by deposed dictator Manuel A. Noriega's loyalists, who hope to use them as "a ticket to get out of town." At a White House news conference, Bush predicted that if the ousted dictator is captured, remaining resistance to the U.S. invasion will collapse and most hostages will be released.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. invasion forces, completing the conquest of Panama's military bases, moved Thursday into the ravaged streets of Panama City to root out Manuel A. Noriega's paramilitary Dignity Battalion and end the chaos and looting that have racked the Panamanian capital. Noriega remained at large, possibly in the countryside. Officials in Washington and Panama sorted through hundreds of tips about him but said that they are sure of only one thing--that he has not been able to get out of Panama.
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