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Hostages Sierra Leone

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NEWS
August 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
A nearly weeklong hostage crisis ended Tuesday when former junta soldiers freed their remaining prisoners after receiving assurances they would not be prosecuted, a top government official said. The rogue rebels released 15 West African intervention force soldiers and a U.N. military observer, along with 200 civilians taken prisoner during this West African nation's brutal eight-year civil war, Information Minister Julius Spencer said at a news conference.
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NEWS
July 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
One Indian U.N. peacekeeper was killed and seven peacekeepers were injured during the weekend raid to free more than 200 U.N. soldiers who were surrounded by rebels, the U.N. commander in Sierra Leone said. "We managed to extricate all the 233 peacekeepers, and in doing so we had one fatal casualty and seven injured," said Indian Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley, the force commander. "This is the price we have to pay." U.N. officials previously had said that four peacekeepers were injured.
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NEWS
May 8, 2000 | From Reuters
United Nations officials said they would step up efforts today to find hundreds of peacekeepers taken hostage or missing in Sierra Leone after the threat of a rebel attack on the capital appeared to recede. The first British paratroops, meanwhile, were due later in the day in neighboring Senegal after Britain's decision Sunday to send five warships and about 1,600 soldiers to West Africa to help any of its citizens who may need to be airlifted out. Bernard Miyet, U.N.
NEWS
May 29, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The monthlong United Nations hostage drama ended Sunday when the U.N. reported that the last of more than 500 captured peacekeepers had arrived here safely after their release by rebels. The long-awaited resolution of the crisis removes a major obstacle in international efforts to revive the country's 10-month-old peace accord, which has been flouted by the rebels since early this month. The U.N.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 46 United Nations peacekeepers were freed Friday by Sierra Leonean rebels and sent to neighboring Liberia, and officials there said more were on the way. U.N. spokesman David Wimhurst said the latest releases raised expectations that the monthlong hostage crisis, which has rocked the troubled peacekeeping mission, was drawing to a close. "We are cautiously optimistic that this will be resolved in the very near future," Wimhurst said here.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials confirmed Monday that 157 U.N. peacekeepers taken hostage in this battle-scarred nation had been freed, in a much-needed boost both to the international mission here and to hopes that a logjam preventing a peace deal could soon end. Sunday's release of the captives--soldiers from a U.N. peacekeeping mission known as UNAMSIL--was secured by Liberian President Charles Taylor, previously known to be a sponsor of the rebel Revolutionary United Front.
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
One Indian U.N. peacekeeper was killed and seven peacekeepers were injured during the weekend raid to free more than 200 U.N. soldiers who were surrounded by rebels, the U.N. commander in Sierra Leone said. "We managed to extricate all the 233 peacekeepers, and in doing so we had one fatal casualty and seven injured," said Indian Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley, the force commander. "This is the price we have to pay." U.N. officials previously had said that four peacekeepers were injured.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a day of highs and lows for the U.N. peacekeeping mission, 29 captured peacekeepers were freed Monday in neighboring Liberia, but the remains of several men in U.N. uniforms were discovered by government forces northeast of here. United Nations spokesman David Wimhurst said the skeletal remains of about half a dozen men were found in U.N. uniforms bearing Zambian insignia. Several of the men had been shot in the head.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Ninety-three exhausted Zambian and Kenyan U.N. peacekeepers, held hostage for two weeks in the bush by rebels in Sierra Leone, flew back to this government-controlled capital late Tuesday from neighboring Liberia. But there was no sign of progress in efforts to secure the release of about 350 U.N. troops of many nationalities still apparently being held by the Revolutionary United Front.
NEWS
May 22, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They arrived here Sunday night under the cover of darkness, their sunken eyes and wobbly legs visible only in the flickering lights of a United Nations cargo plane. Some had no shoes. Others wore borrowed clothing. Three were taken away in an ambulance. In all, 54 soldiers, among more than 500 U.N. peacekeepers taken hostage by rebels in Sierra Leone this month, were flown back to U.N.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 46 United Nations peacekeepers were freed Friday by Sierra Leonean rebels and sent to neighboring Liberia, and officials there said more were on the way. U.N. spokesman David Wimhurst said the latest releases raised expectations that the monthlong hostage crisis, which has rocked the troubled peacekeeping mission, was drawing to a close. "We are cautiously optimistic that this will be resolved in the very near future," Wimhurst said here.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a day of highs and lows for the U.N. peacekeeping mission, 29 captured peacekeepers were freed Monday in neighboring Liberia, but the remains of several men in U.N. uniforms were discovered by government forces northeast of here. United Nations spokesman David Wimhurst said the skeletal remains of about half a dozen men were found in U.N. uniforms bearing Zambian insignia. Several of the men had been shot in the head.
NEWS
May 22, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They arrived here Sunday night under the cover of darkness, their sunken eyes and wobbly legs visible only in the flickering lights of a United Nations cargo plane. Some had no shoes. Others wore borrowed clothing. Three were taken away in an ambulance. In all, 54 soldiers, among more than 500 U.N. peacekeepers taken hostage by rebels in Sierra Leone this month, were flown back to U.N.
NEWS
May 20, 2000 | Associated Press
The Security Council decided Friday to add 2,000 soldiers to the peacekeeping force in Sierra Leone, where hundreds of U.N. troops have been held by rebels for more than two weeks. As the council considered further moves to reinforce the mission, it unanimously adopted a resolution expanding the 11,100-strong force to 13,000 to allow for troops that India, Bangladesh and Jordan have promised will arrive in the next few days.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Ninety-three exhausted Zambian and Kenyan U.N. peacekeepers, held hostage for two weeks in the bush by rebels in Sierra Leone, flew back to this government-controlled capital late Tuesday from neighboring Liberia. But there was no sign of progress in efforts to secure the release of about 350 U.N. troops of many nationalities still apparently being held by the Revolutionary United Front.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials confirmed Monday that 157 U.N. peacekeepers taken hostage in this battle-scarred nation had been freed, in a much-needed boost both to the international mission here and to hopes that a logjam preventing a peace deal could soon end. Sunday's release of the captives--soldiers from a U.N. peacekeeping mission known as UNAMSIL--was secured by Liberian President Charles Taylor, previously known to be a sponsor of the rebel Revolutionary United Front.
NEWS
August 9, 1999 | Times Wire Services
A rebel faction holding Western and other hostages here freed groups of them Sunday, the fifth day of their captivity, sources close to U.N. negotiators said. At least half the 34 who remained captive earlier Sunday had reportedly been released by day's end. U.N. officials listed those released as seven U.N. military observers, six local drivers, two members of the West African ECOMOG peacekeeping force, two journalists, a Ghanaian aid worker and a Sierra Leone government official.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebels in the West African nation of Sierra Leone are holding more than 300 U.N. troops and military observers hostage, officials said Friday, creating a grave crisis for the world body's biggest peacekeeping operation. There were reports that rebels of the Revolutionary United Front, or RUF, were using captured U.N. armored personnel carriers in military maneuvers. Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley of India--commander of the U.N.'
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | From Reuters
United Nations officials said they would step up efforts today to find hundreds of peacekeepers taken hostage or missing in Sierra Leone after the threat of a rebel attack on the capital appeared to recede. The first British paratroops, meanwhile, were due later in the day in neighboring Senegal after Britain's decision Sunday to send five warships and about 1,600 soldiers to West Africa to help any of its citizens who may need to be airlifted out. Bernard Miyet, U.N.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebels in the West African nation of Sierra Leone are holding more than 300 U.N. troops and military observers hostage, officials said Friday, creating a grave crisis for the world body's biggest peacekeeping operation. There were reports that rebels of the Revolutionary United Front, or RUF, were using captured U.N. armored personnel carriers in military maneuvers. Gen. Vijay Kumar Jetley of India--commander of the U.N.'
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