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Hostages Trinidad And Tobago

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NEWS
August 2, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The five-day hostage crisis that devastated the capital city of Trinidad and Tobago ended Wednesday with the surrender of 112 black Muslim rebels who were holding 46 captives in two besieged downtown buildings. Minister of Planning Winston Dookeran, who led the government's negotiating team, said the hostage takers surrendered unconditionally and are being detained under heavy guard at the Teteron army barracks, 10 miles west of Port of Spain.
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NEWS
August 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A battered and bruised Prime Minister A. N. R. Robinson made his first public appearance in a television interview broadcast Saturday and said that radical Muslim rebels who staged a coup attempt shot him as he lay on his stomach in the Parliament building calling for Trinidad forces to attack. "I shouted, 'Murderers! Torturers!' and I called upon the forces outside to attack with full force," he said in the interview taped Friday from his hospital bed.
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NEWS
July 30, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Muslim rebels still held the prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago and at least 38 other hostages Sunday as negotiations to end the twin-island nation's crisis stalled amid reports of widespread looting and an early morning gun battle at one of the hostage sites. News agencies, quoting an executive of Trinidad's state-owned television station, said that Prime Minister A. N. R. Robinson had offered to resign and call early elections in return for the hostages' freedom.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators tricked Muslim rebels and made promises they never meant to keep in order to win the release of 46 hostages after a five-day ordeal at gunpoint, the spokesman for the Trinidad and Tobago government said Thursday. "Why not promise them the moon and the stars when you have hostages under gunpoint?" asked spokesman Gregory Shaw, describing how the hostage crisis that began with bloody violence last Friday night was peacefully ended Wednesday.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An end to Trinidad's hostage crisis drew tantalizingly close Monday, but negotiations collapsed at the 11th hour as renewed gunfire was heard at the Parliament building, where the prime minister of this twin-island nation and about 45 other people are being held captive.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Captive Prime Minister A. N. R. Robinson, suffering a festering leg wound and imperiled eyesight, was released by black Muslim rebels Tuesday, but 40 other hostages were still being held as efforts to free them dragged into a fifth day without progress. The ailing prime minister was led to an ambulance in front of Red House, the twin-island nation's besieged Parliament building, by one of his captors and another hostage, according to Atty. Gen.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
Muslim militants said they seized the Parliament building in this Caribbean capital Friday and were holding the prime minister and his Cabinet hostage. Imam Yasin Abu Bakr, head of a black rebel group called Muslim Meen, had a station newscaster read a statement on national television in which Bakr announced the uprising and claimed to be holding captive in Parliament the prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago, A. N .R Robinson.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiators tricked Muslim rebels and made promises they never meant to keep in order to win the release of 46 hostages after a five-day ordeal at gunpoint, the spokesman for the Trinidad and Tobago government said Thursday. "Why not promise them the moon and the stars when you have hostages under gunpoint?" asked spokesman Gregory Shaw, describing how the hostage crisis that began with bloody violence last Friday night was peacefully ended Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last four days, Juliet Zaidi, a geography lecturer at Cal State Fullerton, has lived the life of a news junkie. A native of Trinidad and Tobago, Zaidi tunes in to virtually every news broadcast she can find about the unrest in that country, and the telephone in her Placentia home has been ringing off the hook with information since last Friday, when Moslem rebels stormed the nation's parliament building and took at least 39 hostages.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A battered and bruised Prime Minister A. N. R. Robinson made his first public appearance in a television interview broadcast Saturday and said that radical Muslim rebels who staged a coup attempt shot him as he lay on his stomach in the Parliament building calling for Trinidad forces to attack. "I shouted, 'Murderers! Torturers!' and I called upon the forces outside to attack with full force," he said in the interview taped Friday from his hospital bed.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The five-day hostage crisis that devastated the capital city of Trinidad and Tobago ended Wednesday with the surrender of 112 black Muslim rebels who were holding 46 captives in two besieged downtown buildings. Minister of Planning Winston Dookeran, who led the government's negotiating team, said the hostage takers surrendered unconditionally and are being detained under heavy guard at the Teteron army barracks, 10 miles west of Port of Spain.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Captive Prime Minister A. N. R. Robinson, suffering a festering leg wound and imperiled eyesight, was released by black Muslim rebels Tuesday, but 40 other hostages were still being held as efforts to free them dragged into a fifth day without progress. The ailing prime minister was led to an ambulance in front of Red House, the twin-island nation's besieged Parliament building, by one of his captors and another hostage, according to Atty. Gen.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An end to Trinidad's hostage crisis drew tantalizingly close Monday, but negotiations collapsed at the 11th hour as renewed gunfire was heard at the Parliament building, where the prime minister of this twin-island nation and about 45 other people are being held captive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last four days, Juliet Zaidi, a geography lecturer at Cal State Fullerton, has lived the life of a news junkie. A native of Trinidad and Tobago, Zaidi tunes in to virtually every news broadcast she can find about the unrest in that country, and the telephone in her Placentia home has been ringing off the hook with information since last Friday, when Moslem rebels stormed the nation's parliament building and took at least 39 hostages.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Muslim rebels still held the prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago and at least 38 other hostages Sunday as negotiations to end the twin-island nation's crisis stalled amid reports of widespread looting and an early morning gun battle at one of the hostage sites. News agencies, quoting an executive of Trinidad's state-owned television station, said that Prime Minister A. N. R. Robinson had offered to resign and call early elections in return for the hostages' freedom.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Muslim extremists staging a coup attempt in Trinidad and Tobago said Saturday that they wired the country's prime minister and 11 other government officials to explosives, and they then demanded a plane to fly to Libya, news reports said. Reporting the first demands by the group since it seized Prime Minister A. N. R.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Muslim extremists staging a coup attempt in Trinidad and Tobago said Saturday that they wired the country's prime minister and 11 other government officials to explosives, and they then demanded a plane to fly to Libya, news reports said. Reporting the first demands by the group since it seized Prime Minister A. N. R.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
Muslim militants said they seized the Parliament building in this Caribbean capital Friday and were holding the prime minister and his Cabinet hostage. Imam Yasin Abu Bakr, head of a black rebel group called Muslim Meen, had a station newscaster read a statement on national television in which Bakr announced the uprising and claimed to be holding captive in Parliament the prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago, A. N .R Robinson.
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