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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
She may no longer be the new girl, but Zooey Deschanel seems to be having some luck making her persona as an awards girl stick. The 33-year-old actress, who headlines the Fox comedy "New Girl," scored her second Golden Globe nomination when the selections were announced Thursday morning. But getting the news to Deschanel nearly required a wacky "New Girl-ish" plan -- she had left her phone in her trailer while shooting the forthcoming post-Super Bowl episode. "I've been up for 20 hours, I'm not fully alive," Deschanel joked.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
She may no longer be the new girl, but Zooey Deschanel seems to be having some luck making her persona as an awards girl stick. The 33-year-old actress, who headlines the Fox comedy "New Girl," scored her second Golden Globe nomination when the selections were announced Thursday morning. But getting the news to Deschanel nearly required a wacky "New Girl-ish" plan -- she had left her phone in her trailer while shooting the forthcoming post-Super Bowl episode. "I've been up for 20 hours, I'm not fully alive," Deschanel joked.
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TRAVEL
February 18, 2007
SOME firsts in life one wants to forget, others one wishes could happen again and again. Angelina in Paris is one of the latter ["When It's Cold, It's Haute," Feb. 11]. I first experienced the rich, velvet hot chocolate in the mid-1980s and will never forget that first sip. Along with the little pot of whipped cream and that cold glass of water, I thought I had died and gone to chocolate heaven. It's not often I get to Paris in the winter, but if I do, Angelina is one of the first places I go. SARABETH ROTHFELD Woodland Hills
SCIENCE
December 5, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
If you enjoy Pi Day (3/14) and Avogadro's Number Day (10/23), then get this: today is a Pythagorean triple date. You'd have to be a serious math nerd to recognize that the sum of the squares of 5 and 12 equals the square of 13. Which is exactly what the co-founders of the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) noticed. So, along with some 2,000 fellow math geeks and museum staff, MoMath co-founder Cindy Lawrence will help surround the most well-known right-triangle-based edifice in the country -- New York's Flatiron Building -- and execute a glow-stick proof of the ancient Greek mathematican's famed theorem.
FOOD
March 30, 1989
Hot chocolate is a great pick-me-upper any time of the day or night. Dreamy Hot Chocolate is special because it has peanut butter and orange liqueur in it. DREAMY HOT CHOCOLATE 2/3 cup cocoa powder 1 cup sugar 1/8 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup hot water 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter 6 cups milk 1 to 2 tablespoons orange liqueur, optional Combine cocoa, sugar and salt in large saucepan. Blend in water. Cook and stir until mixture boils. Allow to boil 2 minutes. Stir in peanut butter until smooth.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1994 | From Associated Press
Just in time for winter: Wendy's says it will spend the next month looking for a way to cool its hot chocolate. Denny Lynch, a spokesman for the fast-food chain, said Tuesday that the company hopes to resume sales in a month or so, after it finds a way to brew and serve the drink at a lower temperature. Wendy's International, which says it sells only about two cups per day per store, serves hot chocolate at 180 degrees, the same temperature it serves coffee and tea.
FOOD
February 9, 2005 | Betty L. Baboujon, Special to The Times
As soon as we turned the corner onto La Rambla, Barcelona's famed pedestrian street, I was ready to sit down at the first outdoor table and order that hot chocolate. The one I had yet to taste. The one that was out of this world. The one my half-Spanish husband kept telling me about all these years. But my husband kept walking, leading me down the restaurant-lined boulevard teeming with street performers, souvenir sellers, awestruck tourists and enterprising pickpockets.
FOOD
January 6, 2011 | By Lorenza Muñoz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Because I left Mexico when I was 6, my recollections of our holiday traditions are often dreamlike and vague. But my memory of Three Kings Day, or el Día de los Reyes Magos , remains vivid because it came right after Christmas, in the first week of January, and it meant there was still one more day of presents left. In Mexico, there is no busier time on the social calendar than the end of the year, beginning Dec. 12, the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Then, there are nine days of parties starting Dec. 16 to celebrate Las Posadas, leading up to a big family dinner on Christmas Eve, followed by New Year's and finally, Epiphany on Jan. 6, when the three wise men were said to have offered their gifts to the baby Jesus.
HEALTH
February 8, 1999
Low-Fat Snack Yum, a frozen hot chocolate--slushy and chocolaty, and with only 3 grams of fat.
FOOD
March 7, 2001 | BARBARA HANSEN
Champurrado is hot chocolate Mexican-style, warm and comforting to drink early in the morning or late on a chilly night. What sets it apart from regular hot chocolate is the addition of corn masa as a thickener. La Azteca, a tortilleria-deli in East Los Angeles, adds masa made from whole-kernel dried corn, rather than instant masa flour. A touch of cinnamon enhances the flavor of the drink. Champurrado, $3 for 1 quart at La Azteca, 4538 Cesar E. Chavez Ave., East Los Angeles. (323) 262-5977.
TRAVEL
February 10, 2013 | By Kayleigh Kulp
SANTA FE, N.M. - It's fair to call me a chocoholic, but it wasn't until a trip to Santa Fe that I realized I'd never had the good stuff. What was supposed to be a casual late-December exploration of this New Mexican cultural hub wound up becoming a full-on chocolate extravaganza in which I dragged my husband, Jay, to a new exhibit, "New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate y Más," at Santa Fe's Museum of International Folk Art, and...
SCIENCE
January 15, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Winners of the Indianapolis 500 drink milk to celebrate their victory; perhaps winners of the Nobel Prizes do the same after receiving a congratulatory phone call from Stockholm.  That's one theory to explain why countries in which people drink the most milk, per capita, also win the most Nobel Prizes , per capita, according to a new study .  Take Sweden, the country that's home to the Nobels. Citizens there have won 31.855 prizes for every 10 million people. They also consume about 350 kilograms of milk each, on average, over the course of a year.  At the other end of the spectrum is China, a country that has won a mere 0.060 Nobels per 10 million people and where the average person drinks less than 50 kilograms of milk per year.  The United States fall close to the middle, with a Nobel-winning rate of 10.731 per 10 million citizens and milk consumption of abotu 250 kilograms per person per year.  Coincidence?
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Jay Jones
If palm trees and sunshine don't put you in the holiday spirit, Grouse Mountain might. The year-round Canadian playground is just 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. Upon arrival, visitors are whisked to the 3,700-foot summit in bright red Skyride gondolas that will be decorated with antlers and a red nose as part of the resort's Reindeer Games theme. The Peak of Christmas festival runs Nov. 24 to Dec. 24 and includes interacting with real reindeer in a natural habitat, caroling during sleigh rides through the snowy woods and ice skating on an 8,000-square-foot pond.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Dia de los Muertos is anything but dead, and it's increasingly coming to life in Southern California in old and new ways. With Mexico's traditional Day of the Dead approaching, the number and kinds of events are growing in the Southland. Concert promoters, art galleries featuring Mexican folk art and merchants - big and small - are taking advantage of these celebrations and in some cases extending the merchandising of Halloween. Once observed quietly in Latino communities, U.S. festivities are becoming more mainstream and, typically, louder and more visible than in years past.
SCIENCE
August 3, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Archaeologists have found residues of cacao -- or chocolate -- on 2,500-year-old plate fragments from the Northern Maya Lowlands in Yucatan, Mexico. Although cacao residue has been found in cups from other sites that are 1,000 years older, this is the oldest trace of cacao in this northern region. Perhaps more important, it is the first evidence that the Maya used cacao for anything other than as a drink. The presence of cacao on a plate suggests that it was used as a spice or sauce for food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld and Aida Ahmad, Los Angeles Times
For years, people went looking for Los Angeles Historical-Cultural Monument No. 137: a Dutch-themed hot chocolate shop that was one of Ernest Batchelder's earliest commissions. They came to a worn-looking building on West 6th Street downtown expecting to see the Arts and Crafts master tile-maker's murals of Dutch maidens in wooden clogs. What they found instead was a small, drab arcade, with stalls selling bargain vitamins, perfume, jewelry and hats. Tile was visible on the ceiling and walls, poorly lighted by fluorescent bulbs.
FOOD
January 25, 1996 | BETTY ROSBOTTOM
I believe that when most of us consider entertaining, we think first of asking friends for a meal or to a party with substantial appetizers. But at this time of the year, after the spate of holiday parties, something more modest seems appropriate. In keeping with this idea, a hot chocolate party would be a simple but imaginative alternative to a more time-consuming dinner. The idea for such a get-together came to me several days ago while I was doing some much-needed cleaning in my study.
TRAVEL
January 9, 2000
Christopher Reynolds missed the mug on hot chocolate ("Paris, Always in Season," Dec. 12). I smugly predicted what I would see when I came to the name of the "dangerously rich hot chocolate" locations--and it was neither La Cour de Rohan nor La Jacobine Restaurant and Salon de The, which Reynolds mentions. I shouldn't have been so smug. Some people are just led astray. And so, Christopher, hop on the Metro, grab a cab or run all the way to 226 Rue de Rivoli. See "Angelina" on the storefront restaurant, "founded in 1903."
FOOD
September 29, 2011 | By Lauren Williams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Much like the metal that comes from deep within Chile's mines, the national spice also has a copper hue. Within the last few years, merkén , made from ground smoked chiles, has moved from being solely a local curiosity to a tabletop mainstay in Chile and is now making headway into the U.S. market. Traditionally used in the cooking of the indigenous Mapuche culture, merkén has a smoky, warm flavor that adds heat and richness to food, especially wintertime dishes. Mapuches traditionally incorporate merkén into cheeses or use it to coat almonds, peanuts and walnuts, but it's also ideal for meats, lentils, sauces and cazuelas , or stews.
TRAVEL
February 6, 2011 | By Mark Vanhoenacker, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After an espresso or two has kicked jet lag into the long grass, I find no better place to plot a course in a city than at an independent bookstore cafe. Many operate more as cultural and community centers than as businesses, with late hours and a medium-sized town's worth of on-site readings, tastings and concerts out of any weather that may be annoying you. Check out their posters and bulletin boards for options farther afield. And ask the staff: Bookstore cafes usually have a nicotine-tinged finger or two on a city's pulse.
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