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Hot Chocolate

NEWS
February 24, 1994
Cup of J coffeehouse in Pomona features different types of live music, from unplugged to alternative to jazz, most weekend nights, along with a huge selection of drinks you don't need an ID for. Don't like coffee? No sweat. You can get hot chocolate or an Italian soda, or something else. Where: Cup of J, 3560 Temple Ave., Pomona. How much: No cover charge. Drinks range from 85 cents to $3, food tops out at $3.85 for an entree croissant. $3 minimum purchase Saturday nights. When: 7 a.m. to 11 p.
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FOOD
April 6, 1995 | KATHIE JENKINS
No one leaves Chicago's Le Francais without sampling the silky chocolate sorbet, the rich chocolate creme brulee , the souffle that erupts molten chocolate or some other intense chocolate creation. Mary Beth Liccioni's desserts are so popular at the reknowned French restaurant that four years ago she and her husband, Roland, created Chocolats Le Francais, a retail and mail order business for the chocolates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | By Amina Khan
It was just before midnight and downtown Los Angeles lay empty and silent, its streets subdued by the rain. But on Spring Street, just around the corner from Cesar E. Chavez Avenue, the sidewalks teemed with humanity. Crowds of pedestrians, many bearing bouquets, spilled into the road while a line of cars inched into a parking lot near Our Lady Queen of Angels Church across from Olvera Street. Vendors selling hot chocolate, tamales and votive candles stood over their steaming stands.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | ADAM BREGMAN
The Smell 247 S. Main St., downtown L.A. (213) 833-2843 Art, experimental music, punk benefits for anarchist causes, indie-rock, Japanese noise and underground film screenings make up the bulk of the entertainment at this club, which looks and smells like a squatter's camp. Having moved downtown from North Hollywood, this club is absolutely vital to the all-ages scene. What the kids say: "It's nice to have a club that's not solely based on making money." * Chain Reaction 1652 W. Lincoln Ave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996
Re "Saturday's Sundaes to be Parlor's Last," June 7: Reading of the closing of C.C. Brown's ice cream parlor in Hollywood was like reading of the unexpected death of a dear, dear friend. I cannot imagine my Los Angeles without the legendary birthplace of the hot fudge sundae and I am not coping with such tragic news very well. There are many memories of that wonderful place I grew up with: My first wide-eyed visit as an 8-year-old with my mother; an hour spent sequestered in one of its high-backed booths with my first date in junior high; a rowdy stop with a group of friends after my high school prom; a quick call to the place with my wife on our wedding day--she in her wedding gown, me in my tux; and my 5-year-old daughter's first wide-eyed visit there last year.
SCIENCE
August 3, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Archaeologists have found residues of cacao -- or chocolate -- on 2,500-year-old plate fragments from the Northern Maya Lowlands in Yucatan, Mexico. Although cacao residue has been found in cups from other sites that are 1,000 years older, this is the oldest trace of cacao in this northern region. Perhaps more important, it is the first evidence that the Maya used cacao for anything other than as a drink. The presence of cacao on a plate suggests that it was used as a spice or sauce for food.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Dia de los Muertos is anything but dead, and it's increasingly coming to life in Southern California in old and new ways. With Mexico's traditional Day of the Dead approaching, the number and kinds of events are growing in the Southland. Concert promoters, art galleries featuring Mexican folk art and merchants - big and small - are taking advantage of these celebrations and in some cases extending the merchandising of Halloween. Once observed quietly in Latino communities, U.S. festivities are becoming more mainstream and, typically, louder and more visible than in years past.
FOOD
March 7, 2001 | THOMAS KELLER and MICHAEL RUHLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chocolate remains among the most mystical of culinary delights, but too often home cooks avoid its pleasures because chocolate intimidates them. They think of the mysterious act of "tempering" chocolate or recall what happened when a drop of water found its way out of the double boiler and a whole silky batch seized on the spot. In fact, chocolate is like those other mystical luxuries, foie gras, caviar and truffles-often the less you do to it, the better.
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