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Hot Chocolate

April 6, 1995 | KATHIE JENKINS
No one leaves Chicago's Le Francais without sampling the silky chocolate sorbet, the rich chocolate creme brulee , the souffle that erupts molten chocolate or some other intense chocolate creation. Mary Beth Liccioni's desserts are so popular at the reknowned French restaurant that four years ago she and her husband, Roland, created Chocolats Le Francais, a retail and mail order business for the chocolates.
February 6, 2011 | By Mark Vanhoenacker, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After an espresso or two has kicked jet lag into the long grass, I find no better place to plot a course in a city than at an independent bookstore cafe. Many operate more as cultural and community centers than as businesses, with late hours and a medium-sized town's worth of on-site readings, tastings and concerts out of any weather that may be annoying you. Check out their posters and bulletin boards for options farther afield. And ask the staff: Bookstore cafes usually have a nicotine-tinged finger or two on a city's pulse.
February 10, 2013 | By Kayleigh Kulp
SANTA FE, N.M. - It's fair to call me a chocoholic, but it wasn't until a trip to Santa Fe that I realized I'd never had the good stuff. What was supposed to be a casual late-December exploration of this New Mexican cultural hub wound up becoming a full-on chocolate extravaganza in which I dragged my husband, Jay, to a new exhibit, "New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate y Más," at Santa Fe's Museum of International Folk Art, and...
When winter's rains sweep through chilly Southern California, all I want to do is rush indoors, cozy up to a good book and prepare a steaming pot of chocolat chaud. Instantly, my thoughts wrap around the memory of the hot chocolate served at the chateau in Belgium. The Chateau du Pont d'Oie, literally "the castle of the goose bridge," made hot chocolate unlike any other.
December 13, 2009 | By Amina Khan
It was just before midnight and downtown Los Angeles lay empty and silent, its streets subdued by the rain. But on Spring Street, just around the corner from Cesar E. Chavez Avenue, the sidewalks teemed with humanity. Crowds of pedestrians, many bearing bouquets, spilled into the road while a line of cars inched into a parking lot near Our Lady Queen of Angels Church across from Olvera Street. Vendors selling hot chocolate, tamales and votive candles stood over their steaming stands.
June 14, 1996
Re "Saturday's Sundaes to be Parlor's Last," June 7: Reading of the closing of C.C. Brown's ice cream parlor in Hollywood was like reading of the unexpected death of a dear, dear friend. I cannot imagine my Los Angeles without the legendary birthplace of the hot fudge sundae and I am not coping with such tragic news very well. There are many memories of that wonderful place I grew up with: My first wide-eyed visit as an 8-year-old with my mother; an hour spent sequestered in one of its high-backed booths with my first date in junior high; a rowdy stop with a group of friends after my high school prom; a quick call to the place with my wife on our wedding day--she in her wedding gown, me in my tux; and my 5-year-old daughter's first wide-eyed visit there last year.
October 27, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Dia de los Muertos is anything but dead, and it's increasingly coming to life in Southern California in old and new ways. With Mexico's traditional Day of the Dead approaching, the number and kinds of events are growing in the Southland. Concert promoters, art galleries featuring Mexican folk art and merchants - big and small - are taking advantage of these celebrations and in some cases extending the merchandising of Halloween. Once observed quietly in Latino communities, U.S. festivities are becoming more mainstream and, typically, louder and more visible than in years past.
November 12, 2012 | By Jay Jones
If palm trees and sunshine don't put you in the holiday spirit, Grouse Mountain might. The year-round Canadian playground is just 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. Upon arrival, visitors are whisked to the 3,700-foot summit in bright red Skyride gondolas that will be decorated with antlers and a red nose as part of the resort's Reindeer Games theme. The Peak of Christmas festival runs Nov. 24 to Dec. 24 and includes interacting with real reindeer in a natural habitat, caroling during sleigh rides through the snowy woods and ice skating on an 8,000-square-foot pond.
January 4, 2010 | By Tina Susman
To appreciate Carmen Botez's love affair with chocolate, one must travel back to her childhood in dreary Romania, where the only chocolate she knew came from China, wrapped in red paper and with a slightly waxy taste. After the fall of the Soviet bloc, Botez had the freedom to travel and to taste. And taste she did: dark chocolate, milk chocolate, white chocolate (yes, she considers it chocolate, contrary to many confectionary snobs), chocolate with fruity, boozy, smooth and nutty interiors, chocolate mixed with spices.
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