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SPORTS
March 6, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Vincent Jackson is now free to move about the country. Or he will be as soon as the NFL's free-agency period starts on March 13. Unlike a year ago, the San Diego Chargers decided not to use the franchise tag on their top wide receiver. Such a move would have counted more than $13 million against the salary cap, a number General Manager A.J. Smith decided the team just couldn't afford this year. Still, Smith said the Chargers are hoping to retain the services of the man who led the team in receiving yards in three of the last four seasons and in touchdown receptions in two of the last three seasons.
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SPORTS
August 27, 2013 | Chris Dufresne
Stanford has been No. 1 in invention, research, sunsets, marching bands (most despised) and several sports that are played in a pool. But come on, seriously, football? Think about it: Less than six years ago, Stanford was a 41-point underdog at USC and pulled off one of the greatest upsets in college football history. How could Stanford get from there to here? Maybe things happen for a reason. Those following this rankings countdown the last 25 days know Texas A&M was set to be No. 1 until it was revealed that quarterback Johnny Manziel allegedly signed the rights away in some hotel room in Miami.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 2010 | By Stefan Stern
Unusually for a business book these days, this one has a restrained, unsensational title. But "Beating the Commodity Trap" describes a process that is (or should be) terrifying for its readers: commoditization. You may think your business offers rare and valuable goods and services. But the chances are that, somewhere, a recent entrant or potential competitor is preparing to do something similar, for a lower price. As the author says, "Everything becomes a commodity eventually." Richard D'Aveni is professor of strategic management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H. This book is a successor to his 1994 work "Hypercompetition," in which he described how technology and globalization were destroying long-established competitive advantages.
SPORTS
March 29, 2013 | By Gary Klein
Wichita State Coach Gregg Marshall said Friday he thinks the UCLA coaching position is a great job. "It's probably one of the top six elite jobs in the country," he said. Marshall then rattled off the list. "North Carolina, Duke, Kentucky, Indiana, Kansas and UCLA," Marshall said. "Those are the six. " Marshall did not say he was interested in UCLA or that UCLA might be interested in him. Marshall's name has been mentioned in connection with the UCLA job. Other potential candidates, such as Shaka Smart (Virginia Commonwealth)
SPORTS
March 29, 2013 | By Gary Klein
Wichita State Coach Gregg Marshall said Friday he thinks the UCLA coaching position is a great job. "It's probably one of the top six elite jobs in the country," he said. Marshall then rattled off the list. "North Carolina, Duke, Kentucky, Indiana, Kansas and UCLA," Marshall said. "Those are the six. " Marshall did not say he was interested in UCLA or that UCLA might be interested in him. Marshall's name has been mentioned in connection with the UCLA job. Other potential candidates, such as Shaka Smart (Virginia Commonwealth)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
CHOWCHILLA, Calif. - This city is in a pickle over a giant orange. The onetime attraction sits rotting in the city storage yard, the end of the road for the last of the Central Valley's fruit-themed food stands that once dotted Highway 99 from Bakersfield to Tracy. There's still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spider webs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. So city worker Joe Roman is perplexed about a sudden, impassioned competition to buy and salvage the ersatz fruit.
OPINION
November 17, 2005
Re "Schwarzenegger's Celebrity Is a Hot Commodity in China," Nov. 15 Since Arnold is so popular in China, maybe he should run for governor there. He could eat Peking duck instead of crow. LINDA MORIARTY Studio City
NATIONAL
February 7, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Sensing from the Rod R. Blagojevich scandal that Senate seats are a hot commodity, North Carolina state Sen. Eddie Goodall put his on EBay. His price isn't a wad of cash or cushy job. All he wants is a pair of seats to next week's North Carolina-Duke basketball game. But what's on offer isn't actually power, influence or his elected position at all. Rather, his EBay ad shows a black leather swivel chair with the Senate seal stitched into the back.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2002
"Reality" is not apparently enough of "a hot commodity" for the Walt Disney Co. to include the larger political and economic context of last July's Pennsylvania mine calamity in its docudrama ("The art of the ordeal," Nov. 24). Disney was so concerned with "getting the details right" that its producers missed the opportunity to reveal the larger causes of this and numerous other mining "accidents" -- company greed and lack of government oversight of mine safety conditions. While President Bush rushed to the Quecreek mine scene to ham it up with the media, arms around rescued miners, he was cutting the budget for mine safety enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here come the real pulp detectives. Faced with a loss of millions of dollars--half the money the city of Los Angeles expected to reap from collecting recyclables--police are fielding special patrols in the west San Fernando Valley to catch the thieves who have taken to stealing the latest hot commodity in the criminal world: old newspapers.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | David Pierson
The hottest properties in this frenetic city have no walls, windows or even front doors. Forget condos, apartments and homes. Real estate investors are scrambling for parking spaces. Single slots are now selling for more than some modest Southern California homes. Witness the $288,000 paid in November for a parking place in a luxury apartment complex on Hong Kong Island. Or the $166,000 tab for a spot in a suburban development called Festival City. A space attached to an exclusive cliffside town house community in the ocean-view neighborhood of Repulse Bay fetched $385,000 in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
CHOWCHILLA, Calif. - This city is in a pickle over a giant orange. The onetime attraction sits rotting in the city storage yard, the end of the road for the last of the Central Valley's fruit-themed food stands that once dotted Highway 99 from Bakersfield to Tracy. There's still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spider webs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. So city worker Joe Roman is perplexed about a sudden, impassioned competition to buy and salvage the ersatz fruit.
SPORTS
March 6, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Vincent Jackson is now free to move about the country. Or he will be as soon as the NFL's free-agency period starts on March 13. Unlike a year ago, the San Diego Chargers decided not to use the franchise tag on their top wide receiver. Such a move would have counted more than $13 million against the salary cap, a number General Manager A.J. Smith decided the team just couldn't afford this year. Still, Smith said the Chargers are hoping to retain the services of the man who led the team in receiving yards in three of the last four seasons and in touchdown receptions in two of the last three seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2011 | By Hugh Hart, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's just another day at the office for Billy Shire, but his work space is anything but routine. In a dimly lighted backroom that serves as headquarters for the godfather of Los Angeles' "lowbrow" art scene, three decades' worth of eye-gouging artifacts joust for attention. Here's a bug-eyed 3-foot princess doll encased in a shadowbox. There's a circus banner emblazoned with squirming serpents. A bass guitar and a surfboard, each embellished with red flames, lean against the artful clutter while a glittering pink- and turquoise-beaded skull perches inside a cherry-topped cage pretty as a birthday cake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
An oil painting of a burning bank that sparked a pair of Los Angeles police investigations also ignited an international auction frenzy. Artist Alex Schaefer has sold the 22-by-28-inch canvas depicting a Chase Bank branch in Van Nuys going up in flames to a German collector for $25,200. The Internet sale on EBay attracted 70 bids. Surprised by the selling price, Schaefer quickly put a 6-by-8-inch painting of a burning Bank of America branch up for sale and sold it for $3,600 to a collector in Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2011 | By Leah Rozen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among the many familiar faces (Cameron Diaz, Justin Timberlake, Jason Segel) in the raunchy new comedy "Bad Teacher" is one not so familiar — and one who nearly steals the movie. British actress Lucy Punch plays the role of Amy Squirrel, a goody two-shoes middle-school teacher in Chicago who is engaged in a very dirty little war with Diaz over a man and the hearts and minds of children. The film opened to surprisingly big box office ($31.6 million in its opening weekend) and mixed reviews, although even critics who didn't like the movie singled out Punch for praise for her gung-ho turn.
SPORTS
August 16, 1987 | BILL DWYRE, Times Sports Editor
The Pete Maravich of women's basketball had her fling at posterity here Saturday and instead ended up falling on her posterior. Hortencia Marcari, the 27-year-old heroine of Brazilian sports, led her team against the United States in the Pan American Games tournament at Market Square Arena. And, from most reports, it was to be a sight to behold. The little Hortencia against the big, bad U.S. women. Underdog Brazil against powerful, talent-loaded USA.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
A friend of mine--a woman--phoned Wednesday to ask if I had happened to see what the federal Food and Drug Administration had just approved. "A new food?" I asked, excitedly. "A new drug!" I was told. Now it was my friend who sounded excited, and I told her so. "Funny you should mention that," she said. "Because that's the whole point."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes the next big thing comes in a small package. A 140-character package, to be precise, in the case of Justin Halpern. Just less than a year ago, Halpern sent out his first tweet about the harsh, often unintentionally funny, things his father said to him. A key re-tweet later (thanks to comedian Rob Corddry), the 29-year-old writer — whose biggest deal to that point had been developing a spec show for Comedy Central — was hearing from Chris von Goetz, head of the television literary department at ICM. Goetz connected Halpern and his writing partner, Patrick Schumacker, with Max Mutchnick and David Kohan of "Will and Grace" fame, and this fall, "$# !
SPORTS
April 17, 2010 | Sam Farmer
A quarterback will be the first player selected in this week's NFL draft, but this could be remembered as the year of big men, blind-side blockers, and (attempted) bailouts. Whereas the St. Louis Rams already might have stitched the name of Sam Bradford on a No. 1 jersey, there's a decent chance the Oklahoma quarterback is the only skill-position player to go in the top 10. The top of the draft, which begins Thursday, will be dominated by 300-pounders on the defensive and offensive lines, and there could be a run on offensive tackles that rivals the flurry of 2008, when teams grabbed seven of them in the first round.
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