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Hot Creek

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TRAVEL
October 10, 1999 | JOHN McKINNEY
A soothing soak, fabulous fly-fishing and an up-close look at one of California's most intriguing geothermal areas are highlights of a hike along Hot Creek near Mammoth Lakes. If hot springs, hiking and trout aren't reasons enough for a visit, Hot Creek has one more attraction: a long hiking season. Hot Creek Trail is the very last Mammoth-area path to be snow-covered in winter and the very first to be snow-free in spring.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
July 22, 2012
A favorite fishing hole Wow! My favorite columnist went to my favorite place - Hot Creek Ranch ["No Frills, Just Fishing Thrills" by Chris Erskine, July 15]. I did have to chuckle when he said to book early because it fills up fast. Reservations are usually made two years in advance, unless there are cancellations, and the same people, like my husband and me, go year after year. When we were there in June, there were only a couple of days available this season, and a man who had caught a 25-plus-inch trout was booking them hoping to catch it again.
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SPORTS
February 1, 1989 | Rich Roberts
The fishing interests have won a big round in their fight to stop the construction of a 10-megawatt geothermal plant on Hot Creek in the Eastern Sierra. Judge Edward Denton of Mono County Superior Court ruled that the county supervisors had failed to follow guidelines of the California Environmental Quality Act when they issued a permit to the Bonneville Pacific Corp. last year to build the plant. The supervisors' vote, incidentally, was 3-2, and the two who voted against the permit remain.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
This isn't one of those cushy Fish-Carltons like those über-expensive Montana trout resorts. Hot Creek Ranch in Mammoth Lakes has nine no-frills cabins whose biggest amenity is one of the sweetest spring-fed creeks you'll ever see, right out your front door. You and other guests will have a two-mile stretch of it all to yourselves. Isn't that the ultimate VIP perk, anyway? Plus, it's an easy five-hour drive from L.A. The bed As noted, nothing fancy. The two-room cabins come in various configurations, but most sleep four if you include sleeper-couches.
SPORTS
September 22, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The knees are gone from Bob Brooks' jeans, a condition attributed to the fishing technique he advocates at Hot Creek Ranch. Especially at 6-feet-4, he has to crawl to sneak up on the trout. "If we had walked up to the edge, we'd have never seen any of this," he says, peeking through the grass to watch browns and rainbows rising to pluck tiny insects off the surface. "Even by crawling in, we spooked one fish."
NEWS
December 14, 2004 | Charles Duhigg
An agreement between California and a private foundation spares the Hot Creek trout hatchery near Mammoth Lakes from crippling budget cuts. The state Department of Fish and Game will continue to operate the Owens Valley facility and fund 60% of its operation under the agreement reached Dec. 7. The Hot Creek Trout Hatchery Foundation and Mono County will contribute fuel, fish chow and items worth $142,000 per year. The hatchery provides 60% of the trout caught in the state.
SPORTS
November 8, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after trout season ended in the Eastern Sierra last week, when the campsites were empty and the tackle stores closed, certain people were catching fish on Hot Creek as fast as they could count them. Wading the little stream three abreast, they were collecting as many as 2,000 trout a day, hardly able to contain their excitement. "There he is!" "Go get him." "Behind you." "Got him." "Big one!"
TRAVEL
July 22, 2012
A favorite fishing hole Wow! My favorite columnist went to my favorite place - Hot Creek Ranch ["No Frills, Just Fishing Thrills" by Chris Erskine, July 15]. I did have to chuckle when he said to book early because it fills up fast. Reservations are usually made two years in advance, unless there are cancellations, and the same people, like my husband and me, go year after year. When we were there in June, there were only a couple of days available this season, and a man who had caught a 25-plus-inch trout was booking them hoping to catch it again.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
This isn't one of those cushy Fish-Carltons like those über-expensive Montana trout resorts. Hot Creek Ranch in Mammoth Lakes has nine no-frills cabins whose biggest amenity is one of the sweetest spring-fed creeks you'll ever see, right out your front door. You and other guests will have a two-mile stretch of it all to yourselves. Isn't that the ultimate VIP perk, anyway? Plus, it's an easy five-hour drive from L.A. The bed As noted, nothing fancy. The two-room cabins come in various configurations, but most sleep four if you include sleeper-couches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2002 | STEVE HYMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setting known for its burbling creeks and snowy peaks--and increasingly for its luxury condos and golf courses--anglers are accusing the town of Mammoth Lakes of a water grab that will allow the resort community to grow at the expense of a beloved trout stream. Only two miles long, Hot Creek holds a special place in the hearts of anglers in California.
NEWS
December 14, 2004 | Charles Duhigg
An agreement between California and a private foundation spares the Hot Creek trout hatchery near Mammoth Lakes from crippling budget cuts. The state Department of Fish and Game will continue to operate the Owens Valley facility and fund 60% of its operation under the agreement reached Dec. 7. The Hot Creek Trout Hatchery Foundation and Mono County will contribute fuel, fish chow and items worth $142,000 per year. The hatchery provides 60% of the trout caught in the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2002 | STEVE HYMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setting known for its burbling creeks and snowy peaks--and increasingly for its luxury condos and golf courses--anglers are accusing the town of Mammoth Lakes of a water grab that will allow the resort community to grow at the expense of a beloved trout stream. Only two miles long, Hot Creek holds a special place in the hearts of anglers in California.
TRAVEL
October 10, 1999 | JOHN McKINNEY
A soothing soak, fabulous fly-fishing and an up-close look at one of California's most intriguing geothermal areas are highlights of a hike along Hot Creek near Mammoth Lakes. If hot springs, hiking and trout aren't reasons enough for a visit, Hot Creek has one more attraction: a long hiking season. Hot Creek Trail is the very last Mammoth-area path to be snow-covered in winter and the very first to be snow-free in spring.
SPORTS
September 22, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The knees are gone from Bob Brooks' jeans, a condition attributed to the fishing technique he advocates at Hot Creek Ranch. Especially at 6-feet-4, he has to crawl to sneak up on the trout. "If we had walked up to the edge, we'd have never seen any of this," he says, peeking through the grass to watch browns and rainbows rising to pluck tiny insects off the surface. "Even by crawling in, we spooked one fish."
SPORTS
November 8, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even after trout season ended in the Eastern Sierra last week, when the campsites were empty and the tackle stores closed, certain people were catching fish on Hot Creek as fast as they could count them. Wading the little stream three abreast, they were collecting as many as 2,000 trout a day, hardly able to contain their excitement. "There he is!" "Go get him." "Behind you." "Got him." "Big one!"
SPORTS
February 1, 1989 | Rich Roberts
The fishing interests have won a big round in their fight to stop the construction of a 10-megawatt geothermal plant on Hot Creek in the Eastern Sierra. Judge Edward Denton of Mono County Superior Court ruled that the county supervisors had failed to follow guidelines of the California Environmental Quality Act when they issued a permit to the Bonneville Pacific Corp. last year to build the plant. The supervisors' vote, incidentally, was 3-2, and the two who voted against the permit remain.
TRAVEL
October 4, 1998 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Roderick is a senior projects editor at the Times
Driving for the pure fun of the road is one of my secret pleasures. Speeding along a highway going no particular place, windows down and the wind blasting my face, is an indulgence I usually choose not to resist. And of all the roads in my life, U.S. 395 is like a love interest that I never quite get enough of.
HEALTH
December 29, 2008 | Hugo Martin
Perhaps a greater health risk in hot springs is the danger of extreme temperature changes, from tepid to scalding in minutes. In general, the pools can hold temperatures of up to 140 degrees and hotter. The hottest hot springs in Southern California is believed to be Sespe Hot Springs in the Los Padres National Forest. One longtime visitor said the water is so hot, he once boiled an egg in the pool.
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