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NEWS
November 29, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Germs that reside on doctors' lab coats, nurses' uniforms and hospital bed curtains are known to contribute to an unacceptably high rate of hospital-acquired infections. And that's just for starters. It turns out that papers passed around hospital offices, labs and patient rooms are potent transmitters of germs too. The fact that paper can carry bacteria is not a surprise. Other studies have demonstrated how filthy paper money is. The new study , however, makes clear that hospitals need to treat paper-transmitted bacteria seriously because the germs transfer from hand to paper so easily.
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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Chris Erskine
Social media have become one of the most telling barometers of travel hot spots. And there's nothing hotter than spring break. Using last year's data, Facebook put together the lists below of the most popular spring destinations for college students and families. Among the overlaps: Santa Monica. Meanwhile, several other SoCal beaches made the family-friendly list. These lists show the top 10 most popular beach destinations based on volume and increase in Facebook check-ins, a feature of the site that allows users to check in to a location while updating their status.
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NATIONAL
June 25, 2012 | By David Zucchino
Sea levels in a 620-mile "hot spot" along the Atlantic coast are rising three to four times faster than the global average, according to a new study by theU.S. Geological Survey. The sharp rise in sea levels from North Carolina to Massachusetts could mean serious flooding and storm damage for major cities such as New York, Philadelphia and Boston, as well as threats to wetlands habitats, the study said. Since 1990, sea levels have risen 2 millimeters to 3.7 millimeters a year from Cape Hatteras, N.C., on the Outer Banks, to Boston, said the study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- As winds gusted up to 30 mph Wednesday morning, firefighters continued to douse hot spots at an apartment building under construction that was destroyed in a raging Tuesday evening blaze . San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee joined Fire Chief Joanne Hayes White on an early morning tour of the scene near AT&T Park in the city's rapidly developing Mission Bay neighborhood. He called the fire "horrific" but said city residents were "very lucky" that firefighters were able to contain the blaze to the one multistory structure.
SCIENCE
January 10, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
California plant life is unusually rich and diverse. The state has more than 5,500 native plant species, more than any other state. Roughly 40% of them are found nowhere else. A new study offers an explanation for that incredible variety: The state's climate, latitude and complex topography created plant refuges that reduced extinction rates. Species that may not have survived elsewhere because of climate shifts during the past 45 million years could persist here in ecological niches.
WORLD
November 26, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Ethan Kim, Los Angeles Times
This week's North Korean artillery attack wasn't the first time isolated Yeonpyeong Island has been center stage in the Korean peninsula's military standoff. Just three miles across ? part military outpost, part civilian fishing village ? Yeonpyeong is the closest South Korean island to North Korea, a few nautical miles from the barricaded shores of Kim Jong Il's secretive regime. For half a century, the two sides have skirmished repeatedly over the archipelago, a tug of war that includes everything from sovereignty to the local catch of blue crab prized by both sides.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2010 | By Susan Josephs, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a recent Saturday night, Lili VonSchtupp (yes, that's her legal name, changed in homage to the Madeline Kahn character in "Blazing Saddles," with altered spelling) attended three different burlesque shows. As producer of the weekly revue "Monday Night Tease," VonSchtupp can also recall the not-so-distant era of several years ago, when "there was maybe one or two burlesque shows per month besides my show. " "Today, you've got four weekly shows, seven monthly shows and a tremendous amount of one-offs," she says.
NEWS
March 23, 2006 | Hugo Martin
More than 70 years ago, the Kelso Depot was the social hot spot for lonely miners and train workers eking out a living in the desolate Mojave Desert. In the depot basement, they played pool or read F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway in the reading room. On the first floor, they hung out at the lunch counter, known as the Beanery, downing 10-cent cups of coffee and $2 T-bone steaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s 9th City Council District is among the poorest in the city, taking in a stretch of South Los Angeles where the median household income is less than $30,000 per year. Yet despite persistent economic woes, the district has become a hot spot for expensive campaign contributions in this year's election, with special interests from across the state spending big in the race to replace termed-out Councilwoman Jan Perry. Labor unions, businesses, billboard companies, healthcare interests and others have spent $900,000 on unlimited "independent expenditures" for state Sen. Curren Price (D-Los Angeles)
SCIENCE
January 5, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saturn's chilly north pole boasts a hot spot of compressed air, a surprising discovery that could shed light on other planets within our own solar system and beyond, researchers reported Friday in the journal Science. Scientists already knew about a hot spot at Saturn's sunny south pole, but data from the Cassini spacecraft show that the winter pole, drenched in darkness, also has a hot spot. The northern spot cannot be observed from Earth because of Saturn's tilt. Researchers said the southern hot spot was probably formed by the warm rays of the sun, but added that compressed air descending from the atmosphere best explained the newly found hot spot on the north pole.
SCIENCE
October 30, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Scientists spent years mapping where top ocean predators gather to feed in large numbers along the West Coast in an attempt to better understand the threats they face from humans. Using electronic tags, researchers tracked the movements of whales, sea lions, sea turtles and other species to find where they overlap most with two dozen man-made pressures, including warming and acidifying waters, fishing, pollution and shipping. The good news? Many of the predators' most threatened hangouts, they found, are already in marine sanctuaries, notably the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary that stretches along the Central California coast from San Francisco to Cambria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
On Monday evening, the summer crowds were thick on the Venice boardwalk. Up at Dudley Avenue, near the northern end of the bustling oceanfront strip, a crowd gathered for a vigil to honor the victims of Saturday's car rampage that injured 16 people and took the life of Italian newlywed Alice Gruppioni . The vigil would begin with 30 seconds of silence, then the crowd would move a block south to the spot where Gruppioni was hit....
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Hydroelectric dams may be known as a relatively clean and low-cost energy source, but a new study says that the sediment trapped behind them makes them hot spots for greenhouse gas emissions. A team of European scientists found that methane, which is produced by organic matter in the sediment that collects behind the impoundments, bubbles up through the water and contributes more of the greenhouse gases driving climate change than previously thought. The scientists studied six small dams on the River Saar in Germany and found “hot spot emission zones” of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that is many times more effective at trapping heat than carbon dioxide.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - He's the biggest nightclub owner in Los Angeles, the man whose Hyde Lounge and Shelter became prime hunting grounds for the paparazzi. He's been photographed cozying up with Paris Hilton, Kristin Cavallari and Sofia Vergara. When HBO's "Entourage" needed a club owner, he got the part - playing himself. Now Sam Nazarian is moving to shed his party boy image and become a Vegas mogul, hoping to parlay his success in L.A.'s fiercely competitive club scene into the cutthroat world of casinos.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
This post has been corrected, please see below for details. In March, the Sunset Strip music venue the Key Club announced that it was closing for good. Few local music fans were especially surprised. The venue had operated in various guises since the '60s - first as Gazzarri's, where it hosted such rock 'n' roll royalty as the Doors, Guns N' Roses and Van Halen - and as the Key Club since 1998. It closed briefly in 2009, but 2013 was to be the final curtain for the club's monthly slate of heavy metal, hip-hop and stuffed local bills where bands sometimes had to prepay for blocks of tickets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s 9th City Council District is among the poorest in the city, taking in a stretch of South Los Angeles where the median household income is less than $30,000 per year. Yet despite persistent economic woes, the district has become a hot spot for expensive campaign contributions in this year's election, with special interests from across the state spending big in the race to replace termed-out Councilwoman Jan Perry. Labor unions, businesses, billboard companies, healthcare interests and others have spent $900,000 on unlimited "independent expenditures" for state Sen. Curren Price (D-Los Angeles)
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | Dr. GLENN ERICSON, For The Times and Got a question about your pet? Send it to Dr. Glenn Ericson, Ask the Vet, Orange County Life, The Times, 1375 Sunflower Ave., Costa Mesa, Calif. 92626. Ericson, a practicing Orange County veterinarian, is incoming president of the Southern California Veterinary Medical Assn
Q: My 5-pound female poodle is subject to "hot spots." They will flare up in minutes, sometimes covering an area of about three square inches, and her skin is bright red. I have heard they are caused by fleas, an allergy and a high-protein diet. I bathe her weekly, medicate the skin on breaking out. I do make her meat loaf myself. I could not find any product sold that she would like. I give her a vitamin supplement daily, Nutra-Cal. She does get nibbles from the table, too. She is 6 years old.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2003 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Tonight's menu: Appetizer. Check e-mail. Main course. Surf Web. Dessert. Log off. Computer chip giant Intel Corp. and the leisure class bible Zagat Survey have produced a guide to the best restaurants and hotels in America that offer wireless fidelity, or Wi-Fi, Internet access. The guide includes Zagat's signature, and sometimes snooty, comments on food and decor. It doesn't, however, rate the quality of Wi-Fi hookups on Zagat's traditional 1-30 scale. Or on any scale.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
What's worse than being disconnected while on the road? Paying for the connectivity you need to have. A new device addresses both those woes. FreedomPop offers various connectivity via Wi-Fi/4G  on its various devices - a USB stick, a hot spot and a “rocket sleeve” for an iPod Touch - that can keep you connected away from home (or even at home). Here's the good news: You get half a gigabyte free. You're probably thinking, “I'll burn through that in a nanosecond and they'll get me on the additional gigabytes I need.” Not so much.
SPORTS
March 21, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Jamaal Franklin is used to it, being questioned about whether he ever killed snakes with a basketball or saw coyotes out his back door. San Diego State's star guard, one of the best players on the West Coast, just smiles and shakes his head. "If it's possible to be an unknown star," Aztecs Coach Steve Fisher said, "that was Jamaal. " The reason: Franklin was raised and played his high school basketball in Phelan, Calif., a small, rural town near the base of the Wrightwood ski area.
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