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NEWS
July 17, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The official heat-related death toll here reached 116 on Sunday, with an unofficial count passing 200, despite scant cooling. Cook County Medical Examiner Edmund R. Donoghue said that "based on the current information we have, we may go over 300" by the end of the week. Eighty-eight weather-related deaths were recorded elsewhere in the Midwest and East, bringing the official national toll to 204.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Natural gas prices plunged 15% in commodities trading Monday on forecasts of warmer weather in the Northeast and Midwest as well as growing fears over the economic slowdown and its effect on energy demand. Monday's decline, the steepest in a decade, reversed a short-lived spurt last week when forecasters said harsher, not warmer, weather was on the way. The plunge is the latest in a sharp monthlong falloff in gas prices from the all-time highs set in late December.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
The first quarter of 2000 was the warmest first quarter in the United States in the last 106 years, federal officials announced Tuesday. The average temperature during January, February and March was 41.7 degrees Fahrenheit, one degree higher than the previous first-quarter record set in 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced. In addition, NOAA data show, the nine-month period from June 1999 to March 2000 was the hottest similar interval on record.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The year 2000 is ending on a nippy note for much of the nation, but overall the country's temperatures were above normal for the year. Although the final measurement will depend on conditions during the remaining two weeks, the average U.S. temperature in 2000 is projected to be 54.1 or 54.2 degrees Fahrenheit, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Monday. That's well above the long-term average of 52.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The year 2000 is ending on a nippy note for much of the nation, but overall the country's temperatures were above normal for the year. Although the final measurement will depend on conditions during the remaining two weeks, the average U.S. temperature in 2000 is projected to be 54.1 or 54.2 degrees Fahrenheit, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Monday. That's well above the long-term average of 52.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Warm weather put consumers out of the shopping mood in October, leaving the nation's biggest retailers with generally disappointing sales figures. But analysts who examined the stores' monthly sales reports Thursday said the outlook for the Christmas shopping season is still good. Consumers stepped up their spending as temperatures fell in the second half of October--proof that they're willing to shop when it suits them.
NEWS
July 10, 1989
Searing heat across most of the nation was punctuated by thunderstorms along the Gulf Coast, from Lake Michigan to the central Appalachians and over part of the Rockies, where temperatures hit record highs along the eastern edge. High winds downed trees and power lines west of Philadelphia, Miss., and damaged several farm buildings. South Bend, Ind., got 3.65 inches of rain, enough to cause street flooding. Houston got a half-inch of rain in 20 minutes.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chicago's death toll from the blistering heat wave soared to 376, and was expected to top 400, after examiners sent to funeral homes ruled that heat had contributed to scores of other casualties. "It appears that the worst is over, but nobody knows where it's going to stop," Medical Examiner Edmund Donoghue said at a news conference.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The unrelenting heat wave that clamped down on the eastern half of the nation became a slow-motion disaster here Saturday as at least 56 Chicagoans died of heat complications, many succumbing inside unvented homes that became furnaces. Health authorities warned that the heat-related toll in Chicago alone could pass 100. "It's as significant as any plane crash," said Cook County Medical Examiner Edmund R. Donoghue. "We're probably going to end up with well over 100 deaths."
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
Many people took the day off for a romp in the sunshine Monday, as temperatures rose to T-shirt comfort range on the third day of a winter heat wave. From the northern Plains to New England, records as old as 108 years were broken. As far north as Boston and Upstate New York, short sleeves replaced winter coats for biking, hiking or a stroll on the beach.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wildfires raged in at least eight states, from California to Florida, on Monday, a red-hot reminder that up to a quarter of the U.S. is gripped by drought. "Hot and dry, and that's the way it's going to stay for the foreseeable future," said Pat O'Bannon, a U.S. Forestry Service official on loan from his Northern California region to help fight fires that raced through woodlands in five Florida counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
The first quarter of 2000 was the warmest first quarter in the United States in the last 106 years, federal officials announced Tuesday. The average temperature during January, February and March was 41.7 degrees Fahrenheit, one degree higher than the previous first-quarter record set in 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced. In addition, NOAA data show, the nine-month period from June 1999 to March 2000 was the hottest similar interval on record.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
It was around noon in Lake Havasu City and the temperature was approaching a high of 107 degrees. But it was still considered a relatively comfortable day by folks in the western Arizona town, where summertime highs usually reach into the searing 120s. "It just isn't as god-hideous as it's been in past years," said Jill Bersell, manager of Lake Havasu Roofing Inc. "Some years you can't even go outside."
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
Twenty-six more people have died from the heat in Chicago, pushing Illinois' heat-related death toll to 50 and the nation's casualties to 148, even as Saturday brought a glimpse of cooler weather to parts of the country. An additional 20 deaths in Chicago may be heat-related and were under investigation, Mayor Richard M. Daley said, announcing the latest death toll from the heat wave that scorched much of the nation and produced New York City's hottest July on record.
NEWS
October 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Temperatures sizzled across the U.S. and the world last month, making it the hottest September on record, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. September's temperatures were the latest in an unprecedented string of record highs. Preliminary data showed a national average temperature of 69.1 degrees, surpassing the September 1931 record of 68.4 degrees.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chicago's death toll from the blistering heat wave soared to 376, and was expected to top 400, after examiners sent to funeral homes ruled that heat had contributed to scores of other casualties. "It appears that the worst is over, but nobody knows where it's going to stop," Medical Examiner Edmund Donoghue said at a news conference.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wildfires raged in at least eight states, from California to Florida, on Monday, a red-hot reminder that up to a quarter of the U.S. is gripped by drought. "Hot and dry, and that's the way it's going to stay for the foreseeable future," said Pat O'Bannon, a U.S. Forestry Service official on loan from his Northern California region to help fight fires that raced through woodlands in five Florida counties.
NEWS
October 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Temperatures sizzled across the U.S. and the world last month, making it the hottest September on record, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. September's temperatures were the latest in an unprecedented string of record highs. Preliminary data showed a national average temperature of 69.1 degrees, surpassing the September 1931 record of 68.4 degrees.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The grim accounting continued here Monday as the Cook County medical examiner's office autopsied 115 bodies while police wagons kept lining up in the morgue parking lot with more. The tally of deaths certified as related to last week's heat wave grew to 179, bringing the number of weather-related deaths around the nation over the last week to at least 291.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The official heat-related death toll here reached 116 on Sunday, with an unofficial count passing 200, despite scant cooling. Cook County Medical Examiner Edmund R. Donoghue said that "based on the current information we have, we may go over 300" by the end of the week. Eighty-eight weather-related deaths were recorded elsewhere in the Midwest and East, bringing the official national toll to 204.
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