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Hotel Cafe

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NEWS
October 6, 2005 | Jeff Miller, Special to The Times
WITH its intimacy, feel-good vibe and nouveau hip location, the Hotel Cafe has emerged as a locus for the newly energized singer-songwriter scene in Los Angeles since it opened in Hollywood almost five years ago. So devotees of the Cahuenga Boulevard venue -- who buzzed about its tightknit fraternity of performers, celebrity drop-ins and atmosphere reminiscent of L.A.'s '70s heyday as a songwriter incubator -- were understandably concerned when the Hotel Cafe got bigger.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
A former Disney employee is expected to announce Monday a federal lawsuit against the entertainment giant, saying she was harassed and unfairly removed from her hostess job after refusing to remove her head scarf while at work. Imane Boudlal, who is Muslim, said she had worked at Storyteller's Cafe in Disney's Grand Californian Hotel & Spa in Anaheim for two years when she began wearing her hijab to work in August 2010. Boudlal said she was told wearing her scarf was a violation of company policy, and she would either have to remove it, cover it with a hat or take a job working out of public sight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2012
COMEDY The Black Version Let's set the stage: An audience member shouts out the title of a popular film and a cast of black comedians then improvs its version, so come IMDB ready. The crew's many funny credits include "MADtv," "Reno 911!," "Punk'd" and "The Pee-wee Herman Show. " Groundlings Theatre, 7307 Melrose Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. $15. (323) 934-4747. http://www.groundlings.com. The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret Writer, actor and comedian David Cross will present and discuss his TV series about a bumbling American office drone who bluffs his way into a senior position at his company's London office.
WORLD
March 25, 2012 | By Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
The cigarette smoke hovers dense inside the neighborhood cafe. Young patrons knock back beers at greasy wooden tables. A heated debate rages about Syria's revolt. The rotund bar owner labels the rebels baltajiya , or bandits, who are ravaging towns and villages. Demonstrators want only change and freedom, replies a young man in a hooded sweat shirt. Others wrangle over the president and the uncertain future. It is a striking scene for a tightly controlled police state.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | Associated Press
A Djibouti court has sentenced a Tunisian to death for the 1987 bombing of a hotel cafe that killed 12 people and injured 40, the most deadly attack ever in this small Red Sea republic. Adouani Hamouda ben Hassan, 31, who described himself as a Palestinian militant, was convicted over the weekend of assassination, attempted assassination and destruction of property.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | David Greenwald and Kevin Bronson
When Palmerston comes to your town, make sure you have an extra drum kit handy. "We were the only band playing in Montreal and we forgot our cymbals in Toronto," says guitarist Basilio Fernando Ferreira, recalling a tour mishap. "I feel sorry for the neighbors of that venue, but they didn't have their mailboxes the next morning." Destruction, especially the sonic variety, is the norm for the thundering three-piece, whose name stems from a town near Ferreira's and brother-drummer Gabriel's native Toronto.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2010
BOOKS Nick Flynn The edgy poet and former ship's captain presents and signs his second memoir, "The Ticking Is the Bomb." The gripping portrait of bewilderment and fatherhood during tumultuous times has drawn glowing praise from John Waters, who called it a "true delight." Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 659-3110. www.booksoup.com. FOOD Sexy Lobster, Succulent Sushi Science writer and culinary expert Trevor Corson will give a talk subtitled "My Favorite Facts about Underwater Bugs, Raw Fish, and the Future of Our Oceans," about life as a Maine lobsterman, marine mating habits, and surprising facts about sushi.
NEWS
September 30, 2004 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
Talk to people about the Hotel Cafe and the same themes recur: honest, intimate, artist-friendly and the '70s. The venue, presently among L.A.'s hottest spots for singer-songwriters, indeed prides itself on being a throwback, and not just musically. Like L.A.'
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | Kevin Bronson
It's Tuesday, one of the biggest days in Cary Brothers' life, the day his album "Who You Are" is released, and the singer-songwriter is talking about good fortune. "I hope my karma is saving itself for the record," he jokes from his home in L.A., where he is laid up. "I cracked my ankle doing the video shoot, then I lost the hard drive on the laptop that does everything for me."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2008 | Mark Sachs, Sachs is a Times staff writer.
Josh Radnor is sitting pretty these days, not only starring in a hit CBS comedy, "How I Met Your Mother," but also as a Hollywood Hills homeowner. "I bought it last December, so I'm still in my first-year honeymoon phase," said the 34-year-old Ohio native. "I never had a place to host before, so it's fun to have people over." He's enjoying it so much that if not for the nudgy folks at My Favorite Weekend, it would be tough getting him to leave. "I find myself going out less and less," he said.
TRAVEL
January 15, 2012 | Rosemary McClure
The Rat Pack lives again -- or at least Palm Springs, once the party pad of Sinatra and the boys, does. The Coachella Valley city, which had devolved into a caricature of a Hollywood playground, has reinvented itself: Its retro-chic look, striking scenery and hip hotels and restaurants are drawing a new generation of visitors. And, of course, there's always the weather, a tourist attraction on its own (in winter, anyway). The city prides itself on having 350 days of sunshine a year, a siren song that plays loudly and clearly in Canada and other frosty North America realms in the depths of winter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2012
COMEDY The Black Version Let's set the stage: An audience member shouts out the title of a popular film and a cast of black comedians then improvs its version, so come IMDB ready. The crew's many funny credits include "MADtv," "Reno 911!," "Punk'd" and "The Pee-wee Herman Show. " Groundlings Theatre, 7307 Melrose Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. $15. (323) 934-4747. http://www.groundlings.com. The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret Writer, actor and comedian David Cross will present and discuss his TV series about a bumbling American office drone who bluffs his way into a senior position at his company's London office.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2011
Slake, a new showcase for long-form journalism, seems not only bent on resuscitating passionate reporting but also the grand tradition of literary partying, which can be a dangerous enterprise with a bunch of people who revel in the joys of a multi-clause sentence. The local magazine will host a night of readings from its second issue, themed "Crossing Over. " Authors will include Dana Johnson, John Albert, Joseph Mattson, Victoria Patterson, Rachel Resnick, Harry Shannon and Joe Donnelly.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Alan Jackson topped the country charts in 1994 with a song that poked gentle fun at all the urban types who, caught up in the country music explosion of that time, had "Gone Country." On Friday, the other boot dropped as Jackson went Hollywood, getting his own bona fide star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, a personal milestone he celebrated immediately after unveiling the star with a small-scale performance for several dozen fans just down the street at the Hotel Cafe. He said he could count on the fingers of one hand, with enough left over to hold a guitar pick, the number of times in recent years he's played a club as intimate as the Hotel Cafe, which at times has fewer people in the audience than Jackson had on stage with him in the form of his eight-piece band.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2010
BOOKS Nick Flynn The edgy poet and former ship's captain presents and signs his second memoir, "The Ticking Is the Bomb." The gripping portrait of bewilderment and fatherhood during tumultuous times has drawn glowing praise from John Waters, who called it a "true delight." Book Soup, 8818 W. Sunset Blvd. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 659-3110. www.booksoup.com. FOOD Sexy Lobster, Succulent Sushi Science writer and culinary expert Trevor Corson will give a talk subtitled "My Favorite Facts about Underwater Bugs, Raw Fish, and the Future of Our Oceans," about life as a Maine lobsterman, marine mating habits, and surprising facts about sushi.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2008 | Mark Sachs, Sachs is a Times staff writer.
Josh Radnor is sitting pretty these days, not only starring in a hit CBS comedy, "How I Met Your Mother," but also as a Hollywood Hills homeowner. "I bought it last December, so I'm still in my first-year honeymoon phase," said the 34-year-old Ohio native. "I never had a place to host before, so it's fun to have people over." He's enjoying it so much that if not for the nudgy folks at My Favorite Weekend, it would be tough getting him to leave. "I find myself going out less and less," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Alan Jackson topped the country charts in 1994 with a song that poked gentle fun at all the urban types who, caught up in the country music explosion of that time, had "Gone Country." On Friday, the other boot dropped as Jackson went Hollywood, getting his own bona fide star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, a personal milestone he celebrated immediately after unveiling the star with a small-scale performance for several dozen fans just down the street at the Hotel Cafe. He said he could count on the fingers of one hand, with enough left over to hold a guitar pick, the number of times in recent years he's played a club as intimate as the Hotel Cafe, which at times has fewer people in the audience than Jackson had on stage with him in the form of his eight-piece band.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2008 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
For a young person fresh out of school and craving energy-channeling structure and tradition, there are many options: Join the Army; get a grad degree in something useless; try a career in folk music. Laura Marling and Johnny Flynn are two wide-eyed English singer-songwriters who chose the latter.
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