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Hotel Restaurant Employers Council Of Southern California

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NEWS
May 6, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
When union organizer Maria Elena Durazo took a job with the hotel and restaurant workers union six years ago, she found a union at war with itself. The long-entrenched Anglo administrators were so out of touch with their predominantly Latino rank-and-file membership that when the members asked for Spanish translation of union meetings, their leaders told them to "learn English." The open animosity between union members and officials bordered on "hatred," she said. Durazo never doubted that she would eventually help oust the old guard, but said she did not imagine that the change would come so swiftly or that she would end up at the helm of the union--Los Angeles' 13,000-member Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union, Local 11. One of the few Latinas to head a major union local in the country, Durazo, 36, is a heroine to the waiters, busboys, cooks and maids who elected her president recently with 85% of the vote.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 2005 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
The union representing workers at eight upscale Los Angeles hotels offered Monday to drop its demand for a 2006 contract expiration -- a major sticking point in the prolonged negotiations. But the union's accompanying requests for higher wages, benefit increases and a promise that the union would be able to organize newly acquired properties were immediately rejected. Although talks are to resume Thursday, both sides appear far apart and doubtful that much progress would be made.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 2005 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
The union representing workers at eight upscale Los Angeles hotels offered Monday to drop its demand for a 2006 contract expiration -- a major sticking point in the prolonged negotiations. But the union's accompanying requests for higher wages, benefit increases and a promise that the union would be able to organize newly acquired properties were immediately rejected. Although talks are to resume Thursday, both sides appear far apart and doubtful that much progress would be made.
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
When union organizer Maria Elena Durazo took a job with the hotel and restaurant workers union six years ago, she found a union at war with itself. The long-entrenched Anglo administrators were so out of touch with their predominantly Latino rank-and-file membership that when the members asked for Spanish translation of union meetings, their leaders told them to "learn English." The open animosity between union members and officials bordered on "hatred," she said. Durazo never doubted that she would eventually help oust the old guard, but said she did not imagine that the change would come so swiftly or that she would end up at the helm of the union--Los Angeles' 13,000-member Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union, Local 11. One of the few Latinas to head a major union local in the country, Durazo, 36, is a heroine to the waiters, busboys, cooks and maids who elected her president recently with 85% of the vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some days it seems as if nearly everybody has a bone to pick with Rebuild L.A. and its chairman, Peter V. Ueberroth. On Thursday, it was organized labor and advocates for the disabled. A coalition of Los Angeles union leaders blasted Ueberroth at a news conference for not selecting any members of organized labor to serve on Rebuild L.A.'s board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1989 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
A prolonged power struggle between a large hotel chain and a labor union that represents thousands of low-wage immigrant workers escalated Tuesday with the arrest of 11 union members who refused police orders to end a noisy demonstration in the lobby of the Hyatt Wilshire.
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