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August 1, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
The lore of the Old West often credits the likes of Wyatt Earp for bringing propriety to lawless towns. Others attribute that arduous feat to Fred Harvey. Harvey's taming of the West did not involve a gunfight at high noon. The English-born businessman brought fine food and comfortable, attractive hotels to the towns along the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, not to mention the Harvey Girls, the renowned waitresses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2005 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
When it opened in 1906, the Alexandria was heralded as one of America's grandest hotels, built for $2 million in the Beaux Arts revival style, with a 60-foot-high lobby of Italian and Egyptian marble and extravagant gold leaf ceilings. Record-breaking crowds welcomed it. Soon the hotel was catering to presidents and celebrities. Within a few years, builders added a $2.5-million, 12-story annex and a second annex of about 60 rooms. But the Alexandria's heyday was short-lived.
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NEWS
October 31, 1987 | Paul Dean
It has been 100 years since the Hotel del Coronado opened, and in that century most of it has been stolen. Not outright thievery of hardware, mind you, not the wholesale for resale pinching of brass beds, bathtubs and bar stools. But a noticeable loss, nevertheless, a subtle siphoning of the hotel's emotional history, personality and feel. Such as yesteryear's ambiance caught by a guest's 1932 box camera.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1995 | DEBORAH KLOSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It may be the newest hotel in this picturesque Castillian town, but its carved stone facade is a clear giveaway that the inn wasn't built yesterday. Inside, medieval church music plays softly as actors dressed as monks swing incense burners through the dining room, where dishes are based on recipes used 400 years before this 16th-Century convent was transformed into a state-run Paradores hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2005 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
When it opened in 1906, the Alexandria was heralded as one of America's grandest hotels, built for $2 million in the Beaux Arts revival style, with a 60-foot-high lobby of Italian and Egyptian marble and extravagant gold leaf ceilings. Record-breaking crowds welcomed it. Soon the hotel was catering to presidents and celebrities. Within a few years, builders added a $2.5-million, 12-story annex and a second annex of about 60 rooms. But the Alexandria's heyday was short-lived.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1995 | DEBORAH KLOSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It may be the newest hotel in this picturesque Castillian town, but its carved stone facade is a clear giveaway that the inn wasn't built yesterday. Inside, medieval church music plays softly as actors dressed as monks swing incense burners through the dining room, where dishes are based on recipes used 400 years before this 16th-Century convent was transformed into a state-run Paradores hotel.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When George Stevens was a kid he played tag on the plot of land where his Stick & Stein Eatery & Sports Parlor stands. Later, Rob's Restaurant w as built on the lot, and Stevens came here for dinner with his parents. He was a regular at Jolly Rogers, after it replaced Rob's. The nostalgia factor propelled Stevens to buy the restaurant a year ago when the last resident, the 707 Bar and Grill, couldn't make a go of this El Segundo property just south of the airport.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Anne Harnagel, Los Angeles Times staff writer
The Golden Gate Bridge turned 75 this year, but it's not the only Golden Gate with a reason to celebrate. The Golden Gate Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas has unveiled a major expansion -- its first in 50 years -- that adds a five-story luxury tower with 16 suites to the 122-room boutique hotel. Fourteen suites honor swinging Rat Pack guests such as Frank Sinatra , Sammy Davis Jr . and Dean Martin . They include a 50-inch flat-screen TV, a California king bed and a sectional sofa with a queen-size pull-out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
The death of Canadian tourist Elisa Lam, whose body was found in a water tank atop a Los Angeles hotel, has inspired the plot of a Hollywood horror movie. Lam, 21, was found dead  in a water tank on the roof of the Cecil Hotel on Feb. 21, 2013. Her odd behavior in the hours before her disappearance sparked fears and  conspiracy theories  about how she died. Deadline Hollywood reported that Sony Pictures Entertainment and Matt Tolmach Productions acquired rights to the screenplay “The Bringing,” speculatively written by Brandon and Phillip Murphy, which focuses on a detective's mysterious encounters as he investigates Lam's death.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
In Shanghai , guests at the Peninsula Hotel will greet the Chinese New Year by snaking through the lobby doing a lion dance. In Bangkok and Beijing , they will celebrate at the Peninsula's afternoon tea. And in Hong Kong , they will watch the city's colorful holiday fireworks show explode over Victoria Harbour while sipping Champagne on the Sun Terrace. Most of the events are taking place Feb. 10, when the Chinese New Year kicks off in Asia and around the world. Peninsula Hotels, whose history in China dates to 1866, is welcoming the Year of the Snake with special events and rates at its nine properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
The lore of the Old West often credits the likes of Wyatt Earp for bringing propriety to lawless towns. Others attribute that arduous feat to Fred Harvey. Harvey's taming of the West did not involve a gunfight at high noon. The English-born businessman brought fine food and comfortable, attractive hotels to the towns along the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad, not to mention the Harvey Girls, the renowned waitresses.
NEWS
October 31, 1987 | Paul Dean
It has been 100 years since the Hotel del Coronado opened, and in that century most of it has been stolen. Not outright thievery of hardware, mind you, not the wholesale for resale pinching of brass beds, bathtubs and bar stools. But a noticeable loss, nevertheless, a subtle siphoning of the hotel's emotional history, personality and feel. Such as yesteryear's ambiance caught by a guest's 1932 box camera.
TRAVEL
October 9, 1988 | DON JAMES, James is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
"Japan Solo" by Eijo Kano and Constance O'Keefe does a nice job of introducing that country's cultural riches, landmarks and culinary delights and includes how to choose the right train transportation. Additional tips and suggestions and well-detailed maps. For better communication there is a collection of tear-out flash cards that cover most questions (Warner: $14.95).
WORLD
October 18, 2009 | Barbara Demick
You can't help but wonder whether Mao Tse-tung would be rolling over in his mausoleum if he could hear the ka-ching! of cash registers ringing up the amazing array of tchotchkes, from snow globes to glow-in-the-dark figurines, sold with his likeness. Or if the founder of Communist China, who fretted about "the serious tendency toward capitalism among the well-to-do peasants," could hear this blithe assertion by a visitor here: "I think that what Chairman Mao really intended was for Chinese people to get rich."
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