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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Jasmine Elist
When Lilibet Snellings moved to Los Angeles at age 22, she quickly became a "slash": a writer/editor/actress/model/waitress/Box Girl. One night every week, Snellings would go to the Standard Hotel in West Hollywood, put on a pair of white boy shorts and a matching tank top and crawl into a large glass box in the hotel lobby. While in the box, she could do whatever she wanted - write, check e-mails, read, listen to music - as long as she ignored the hotel guests who would curiously point at the human art installation in front of them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
The release of a new Wes Anderson film has been a highly anticipated event among the quirky filmmaker's fans ever since his breakout success "Rushmore" in 1998. "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is debuting in four theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Friday, is sure to continue that tradition.  The movie takes place in Eastern Europe between World War I and World War II and stars Ralph Fiennes as a hotel concierge who befriends a lobby boy. It has generally won over critics, as indicated by a 89% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes -- a good sign for a limited release poised to expand nationwide over the next few weeks.  REVIEW: Wes Anderson makes 'Grand Budapest' a four-star delight Better known for offbeat critical darlings than box office smashes, Anderson has nonetheless generated  some money-makers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Moviegoers checking into "The Grand Budapest Hotel," Wes Anderson's new movie about a swashbuckling concierge and his dutiful protege in 1930s Europe, will encounter many of the director's aesthetic idiosyncrasies, such as dollhouse-like sets, quirky characters and deadpan dialogue. According to film critics, however, "Grand Budapest" isn't just a movie for Anderson aficionados - it's an accomplished work that deserves attention even from nonbelievers. The Times' Kenneth Turan writes that while Anderson's films can be "hermetic, even stifling," his latest "is anything but. " In "Grand Budapest," Turan says, "the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
More than just about any other major American filmmaker working today, writer-director Wes Anderson doesn't so much make movies as create worlds. Each of his films takes place in its own strange sovereignty, whether the Texas prep school of "Rushmore," the train running through India in "The Darjeeling Limited" or the island hideaway for a pair of adolescent lovers in "Moonrise Kingdom. " His latest, "The Grand Budapest Hotel," is set in the fictional country of Zubrowka. Though the story skips through multiple time periods, the main action is set in the 1930s against the backdrop of impending war, as a meticulous yet rambunctious concierge known as Monsieur Gustav H. (Ralph Fiennes)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Wes Anderson sweats the details. All of them, all the time, to an extent that can be maddening. But not in "The Grand Budapest Hotel," where the writer-director's familiar style blends with a group of unexpected factors to create a magnificently cockeyed entertainment. With credits including "Moonrise Kingdom," "The Darjeeling Limited" and the stop-motion animation "Fantastic Mr. Fox," Anderson works so assiduously to create obsessively detailed on-screen worlds that the effect has sometimes been hermetic, even stifling.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
A striking new hotel under construction on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood will be a swanky outpost of the James, an upscale boutique brand in major urban centers. The 286-room hotel at the southeast corner of Sunset and La Cienega boulevards is part of a $300-million complex under construction at the intersection. The development, known as Sunset La Cienega, will also have apartments, shops and restaurants. Developer CIM Group said it formed a partnership with Denihan Hospitality Group to build the James Los Angeles, which will be the first new ground-up hotel in West Hollywood in three decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
The death of Canadian tourist Elisa Lam, whose body was found in a water tank atop a Los Angeles hotel, has inspired the plot of a Hollywood horror movie. Lam, 21, was found dead  in a water tank on the roof of the Cecil Hotel on Feb. 21, 2013. Her odd behavior in the hours before her disappearance sparked fears and  conspiracy theories  about how she died. Deadline Hollywood reported that Sony Pictures Entertainment and Matt Tolmach Productions acquired rights to the screenplay “The Bringing,” speculatively written by Brandon and Phillip Murphy, which focuses on a detective's mysterious encounters as he investigates Lam's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Cathy Youngblood leaves home at 5 a.m., walks a mile in the dark and catches a Blue Line train at the Watts station. She transfers to the Red Line downtown, then boards a bus at Sunset and Vermont and gets to West Hollywood at 6:45, ready for her job as a hotel housekeeper. That's the daily schlep for Youngblood, 62, whose story tells you something about the local economy. She has two college degrees, one of them in anthropology. But after working her way through school as a custodian, the housekeeping job was the best she could find.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
On the main boulevard leading to Los Angeles International Airport, an aging office building will be converted into a much more in-demand product: a hotel. The 12-story Royal Airport Center at 5933 W. Century Blvd. will be turned into a 231-room Residence Inn by Marriott, contractor R.D. Olson Construction said. Olson will perform the $44.5-million makeover for the building's new owner, a limited liability company called Svi Lax. Guest amenities are to include a pool, spa, fire pit, sports court, exercise room, business center and meeting space.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan - An explosion Tuesday evening at a hotel in southern Afghanistan's Oruzgan province killed at least eight people and injured 37,  authorities said. The Afghan Interior Ministry said the attacker was a sucide bomber who was thought to be staying at the hotel in the provincial capital, Tarin Kowt. But the provincial governor, Amir Mohammad Akhundzada, said investigators had not ruled out the possibility that the bomb had placed in a shop in the building. The victims were civilians staying at the hotel, Akhundzada said.
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