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Hou Hsiao Hsien

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August 26, 1990 | Paul Clark, Clark, a research associate at the East-West Center in Honolulu, is the author of "Chinese Cinema," (Cambridge), a history of mainland Chinese filmmaking since 1949
Last summer, while U.S. movie audiences in were reveling in the adventures of Batman and Indiana Jones, cinemas in Taiwan and Hong Kong were doing excellent business with a long, complicated, serious film about an episode in Taiwan history. In the land of the martial arts leap-and-kick film, the commercial success of "A City of Sadness" came as a surprise. But Hou Hsiao-hsien, the Taiwan director of the film, has made a career of capturing the spirit of his times on film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | Graham Fuller, Special to The Times
In Hou Hsiao-hsien's "The Flight of the Red Balloon," the enigmatic title character wafts around Paris, boards a Metro and catches the attention of a little boy, Simon (Simon Iteanu). Though the relationship between boy and balloon in Albert Lamorisse's 34-minute classic "The Red Balloon" (1956) was ardent, Simon's interest in the scarlet bubble is no more than curious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the mid-'80s, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival kicked off, as new festivals are wont to do, with heady, high ambitions. The theory was that a festival in a tourist-destination burg close to Hollywood stood a good chance of entering the top echelon of international film showcases. Reality settled in, and so did the event's self-identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, the Taiwanese cinema has emerged as one of the most provocative and challenging in the world, yet its films don't receive regular U.S. theatrical release, with the recent "Yi Yi" a rare exception. This is what makes the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's "A Hou Hsiao-hsien Retrospective" so important. Hou is the most renowned of Taiwan's top filmmakers, and LACMA is providing a unique opportunity to see seven of his films, starting Friday at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last decade, the Taiwanese cinema has emerged as one of the most provocative and challenging in the world, yet its films don't receive regular U.S. theatrical release, with the recent "Yi Yi" a rare exception. This is what makes the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's "A Hou Hsiao-hsien Retrospective" so important. Hou is the most renowned of Taiwan's top filmmakers, and LACMA is providing a unique opportunity to see seven of his films, starting Friday at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | Graham Fuller, Special to The Times
In Hou Hsiao-hsien's "The Flight of the Red Balloon," the enigmatic title character wafts around Paris, boards a Metro and catches the attention of a little boy, Simon (Simon Iteanu). Though the relationship between boy and balloon in Albert Lamorisse's 34-minute classic "The Red Balloon" (1956) was ardent, Simon's interest in the scarlet bubble is no more than curious.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
The Boys from Fengqui Taiwan Sunday, 6 p.m., Laemmle Grande, 349 S. Figueroa St. Hou Hsiao-hsien's 1983 "Boys from Fengqui" takes place in a village and city, both of which are perched on the ocean. In it, a quartet of reckless, thoughtless boys, energetic bumpkins who imagine themselves street-wise, try to ride roughshod through life and keep bumping their noses.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Daughter of the Nile Taiwan Laemmle Grande, 349 Figueroa St., 6 p.m. This film reminds us that, especially in movies, art can be found in unlikely places. It's a violent teen-age melodrama whose plot and title derive from a popular Asian comic strip, whose lead actors include two famous pop singers and the owner of a trendy Taipei boutique, and whose fictional heroine works in a Taiwanese branch of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Does that sound like a recipe for disaster?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Films and videos representing 25 Pacific cultures screen through Sept. 16. Highlights of today's and Friday's programs are reviewed here: Today: The Sandwich Man Taiwan Screens at 6 p.m., Laemmle Grand, 349 S. Grand Ave. The short film by Taiwanese master Hou Hsiao-hsien is a delicate vignette based on a short story by Huang Chunming, and serves as the title episode in a three-part movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2001
* The Harlem Globetrotters play their unique style of basketball at 7 p.m. next Thursday at Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., downtown L.A. $11-$75. (213) 480-3232. * Rosanna Gamson/Worldwide presents the premiere engagement of "Rita Goes to Hell" March 1-4 at Highways Performance Space, 1651 18th St., Santa Monica. $15. (310) 315-1459. * The Swiss mime troupe Mummenschanz performs "Next" Wednesday-March 4 at the Irvine Barclay Theatre, 4242 Campus Road, Irvine. $17-$35. (949) 854-4646.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the mid-'80s, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival kicked off, as new festivals are wont to do, with heady, high ambitions. The theory was that a festival in a tourist-destination burg close to Hollywood stood a good chance of entering the top echelon of international film showcases. Reality settled in, and so did the event's self-identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | Paul Clark, Clark, a research associate at the East-West Center in Honolulu, is the author of "Chinese Cinema," (Cambridge), a history of mainland Chinese filmmaking since 1949
Last summer, while U.S. movie audiences in were reveling in the adventures of Batman and Indiana Jones, cinemas in Taiwan and Hong Kong were doing excellent business with a long, complicated, serious film about an episode in Taiwan history. In the land of the martial arts leap-and-kick film, the commercial success of "A City of Sadness" came as a surprise. But Hou Hsiao-hsien, the Taiwan director of the film, has made a career of capturing the spirit of his times on film.
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