Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHoudini
IN THE NEWS

Houdini

ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992 | Jeffrey Wells, (Wells was hired by Stark in 1989 to co-author, with the late Stuart Byron, a critical overview of the Houdini project but has no financial interest in it.)
When director Robert Zemeckis ("Death Becomes Her," "Back to the Future") walked away from producer Ray Stark's "The Great Houdini"--written by Peter Seaman and Jeffrey Price ("Who Framed Roger Rabbit")--last month, it was the latest in a series of setbacks that Stark has endured on the project, which has had an 18-year development process that's frustrated eight major writers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1990 | From United Press International
A magician who compared himself to the legendary Harry Houdini and had himself buried inside a plastic-and-glass coffin for a Halloween night escape trick was killed when the coffin collapsed under tons of dirt and wet cement. Joseph Burrus, 32, a recovering drug addict, was performing the stunt at a local amusement park, Blackbeard's Family Fun Center, when the coffin unexpectedly collapsed.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's in a name? Everything when that name is Houdini. The late great escape artist and magician died in Detroit on Halloween, Oct. 31, 1926, at the age of 52. His legacy includes one of the world's greatest collections of magical apparatus and personal papers ever assembled. It took a professional practitioner of the art of legerdemain, naturally, to assemble such a collection.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a West Hollywood-based free-lance writer.
Even on hot sunny California days, it is cool and dark among the tree-shaded ruins. Crumbling staircases lead to dead ends choked with ivy. Devilish markings are scrawled on the walls of spider-infested caverns, and the faint scent of incense is in the air. Remnants of this house in the hills above Hollywood seem like the perfect haunting grounds for the world's most famous magician, Houdini.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a West Hollywood-based free-lance writer
Even on hot sunny California days, it is cool and dark among the tree-shaded ruins. Crumbling staircases lead to dead ends choked with ivy. Devilish markings are scrawled on the walls of spider-infested caverns, and the faint scent of incense is in the air. Remnants of this house in the hills above Hollywood seem like the perfect haunting grounds for the world's most famous magician, Houdini.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1989 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
In 73 years, the San Diego Zoo has had a lot to brag about. Its proudest moments, however, would not fall under the title "The Great Escape." There was the rare, 600-pound African antelope that thundered across a golf course. There was the jaguar that skittered between a keeper's legs and caromed toward the exit, its claws clicking on the concrete. And there was the orangutan that left for a stroll, only to surrender--to everyone's goggle-eyed amazement--to a keeper's outstretched palm.
NEWS
July 3, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Author, lecturer and columnist Conor Cruise O'Brien once cautioned, only half in jest, that before anyone writes the political obituary of Charles Haughey, he had better double-check that the canny Irish politician is actually in the grave with a stake through his heart. While O'Brien admittedly ranks near the top of the list of Haughey's detractors, few of any political stripe in Dublin would argue over the basic wisdom of the commentator's advice.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | KEITH B. RICHBURG, The Washington Post
Prime Minister Mahathir Mohammed has been called the Houdini of Malaysian politics, and with good reason. After a year of unprecedented political turmoil, including leadership challenges, corruption scandals and mounting racial tension, the bespectacled and abrasive former physician has confounded analysts by using the various crises to solidify his grip on power. He now controls virtually every aspect of the country's political life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1987 | CONNIE BENESCH
When, after much hoopla and hype, Geraldo Rivera finally opened gangster Al Capone's giant concrete vault on national television last year, he turned up only dirt and debris instead of a bounty of bones, booze or money. TV programmers, however, discovered something better: ratings gold. "The Mystery of Al Capone's Vaults" was the most-watched syndicated special ever and launched a new genre of programming characterized as "live TV events."
SPORTS
May 31, 1987 | WILLIAM GILDEA, The Washington Post
Brooks Robinson turned 50 the other day. My magazine is falling apart, the one with Brooks and Frank on the cover. The Robinsons are dressed in their Orioles uniforms, smiling and holding bats on their shoulders. Nineteen sixty-six. Their first pennant. The magazine needs binding; for now, I'll slip it back in the drawer. But who can put the memories away? Brooks in the hot corner was easy to love, a blend of grace and flair. He made the easy plays look effortless, and the hard plays look easy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|