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BUSINESS
July 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Educational textbook publisher Houghton Mifflin Co. agreed to buy the remaining U.S. units of scientific and medical publisher Reed Elsevier for $4 billion in cash and stock, creating what could become the largest K-12 publisher in the country in terms of market share. The Boston-based division of Houghton Mifflin Riverdeep Group will pay $3.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday but expects to emerge from restructuring by the end of June. The Boston company said in a statement that it expects to eliminate $3.1 billion of debt through a debt-to-equity transaction that is backed by the “vast majority of key financial stakeholders.” The filing, made in a New York bankruptcy court and expected for weeks, will not affect Houghton Mifflin's daily operations nor its employees' pay and benefits, the company said.
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BUSINESS
July 31, 2002 | CORIE BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to quell rumors that its American textbook publisher is for sale, Vivendi Universal's new chairman, Jean-Rene Fourtou, sent an e-mail message Tuesday assuring its publishing chairman that the Boston-based Houghton Mifflin unit is not for sale. The news, shared with Houghton Mifflin employees via companywide e-mail, was greeted with relief.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009
PAPERBACKS Fiction -- Fiction weeks on list 1. True Detectives by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine: $27) 1 Two crime solving brothers find themselves assigned to the same missing persons case. 2. Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer (Little, Brown: $19.99) Bella 38 must choose between her lover and a friend, between life and death. 3. Long Lost by Harlan Coben (Dutton: $27.95) Private eye 1 Myron Bolitar takes the case of a woman accused of murdering her ex. 4. Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer (Little, Brown: $22.99)
BOOKS
December 1, 1985 | Patricia Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum RN is a clinical instructor of nursing at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. and
Beneath the rape, the strike and the neurotic celebrity patients, there is a more than decent novel in here, somewhere. Not great literature, certainly, but Richard Frede's ability to describe both the hospital work and the people doing it is remarkably on target. He did his medical homework carefully and well. The situations are real, accurate and dramatic. Technical expertise, patient care procedures, compassion, frustration, exhaustion and satisfaction are all here.
BOOKS
August 1, 2004 | Glyn Maxwell
Sundays, like a stanza break Or shower's end of all applause, For some old unexplaining sake The optimistic tread these shores, As lonely as the dead awake Or God among the dinosaurs.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989 | Thomas Cahill
"Here is a book that you could read on the beach, it is that pleasant and diverting; but here is a book that, if taken to heart by the right people, could change the face of America. If you think you've read your last book on education, try just this one more."
BOOKS
March 16, 1986 | SUE MARTIN
This supernatural mystery centers around Jonathan Corbin, a network executive in New York City, who is afraid to go out in mid-town Manhattan snowstorms. He sees the ghosts of streets and people of a hundred years ago, and they get stronger and stronger, threatening to overwhelm his everyday reality. He's witness to murder, robber baron and boardroom mayhem, and recognizes Teddy Roosevelt and John L. Sullivan swirling about in these visions.
BOOKS
May 24, 1987 | Don G. Campbell, Campbell is the author of four books and a Times staff writer.
"Alienation: a withdrawing or separation of a person or his affections from an object or position of former attachment." Any parent who has experienced it--seen a son or daughter turn, blankly, away--knows the wrenching sense of desolation and the guilt, or the puzzlement, of the "whys" that swirl around it. What should I, what could I, have done to avoid this? More frustrating than that: Would anything I could have done made a difference, anyway?
BOOKS
April 22, 1990 | Richard Eder
"It is an ultimate, indelible image of war in our time, and in time to come."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008
It's hard to say what makes a book a favorite. It can be the story or something more amorphous: a turn of phrase, an author's perspective, the way a situation speaks to you. This week, we offer our 50 favorite books of 2008 and ask our online columnists to weigh in with theirs. Enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
One OF THE ways to recognize truly great writers is that even their mistakes engage us. Philip Roth is our greatest living novelist, and his new book, "Indignation," is an irritating, puzzling and fascinating bundle of mistakes, miscalculations and self-indulgences. (This being Roth in a slightly retrospective humor, there's also a great deal of what used to be called self-abuse, actual and symbolic, but that's another story.) Readers familiar with Roth's 28 previous books will recognize familiar territory, characters and preoccupations in "Indignation."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
In 1973, an expatriate American novelist possessed of great ambitions, pretty good reviews and slender means set out from London's Victoria Station to circumnavigate the great Eurasian land mass, mostly by train. Two years later, he published an account of that epic journey, "The Great Railway Bazaar." The 32-year-old novelist was Paul Theroux, and it overstates nothing to say that his book turned the page and set down the beginnings of a new chapter in one of literature's oldest continuous genres: travel writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2008 | Wendy Smith, Special to The Times
Aharsh prairie wind scours the pages of Erin McGraw's beautifully written second novel, "The Seamstress of Hollywood Boulevard." Even after Nell Plat uproots herself from Mercer County, Kan., and follows her dreams to California, gusts of memory buffet her new life as a shopgirl and aspiring costume designer in early 20th century Los Angeles. McGraw, who has also written three short story collections, crafts masterful sentences that embody the landscapes her heroine inhabits.
BOOKS
June 29, 2008 | Pam Houston, Pam Houston is the author of "Cowboys Are My Weakness" and "Sight Hound," among other books. She lives in Creede, Colo., near the headwaters of the Rio Grande.
DEANNE STILLMAN loves the desert. It is, she writes, "my beat and my passion," a place where city life fades away, her thoughts vanish and she hears things: "The beating of wings. The scratching of lizard. The crack of tortoise egg. The whisper of stories that want to be told." Her 2001 book, "Twentynine Palms: A True Story of Murder, Marines, and the Mojave," told one of those stories, of the violent murder of two local girls who had been "sliced up" by a Marine in the desert.
BOOKS
June 29, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
RICK BASS is one of this country's greatest and most reluctant activists. He grew up in Texas, worked for eight years in Mississippi as an oil and gas geologist and moved, 21 years ago, to the Yaak Valley in northwestern Montana. He started writing fiction, but it didn't take long for the landscape and a certain "chemistry of spirit" to turn him into an environmental activist. Bass was, he freely admits, shaped by the land. "Why I Came West" is the story of that process.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2008 | Sarah Weinman, Special to The Times
ONE OF the best developments in contemporary crime fiction of late is how willing, even eager, writers are to explore uncharted territory. What with the mini-boom of translated Scandinavian novels by Arnaldur Indridason, Karin Fossum and Jo Nesbo (to name just a handful), Deon Meyer's and Michael Stanley's criminal investigations in the wilds of Africa and Matt Beynon Rees' elegant mysteries set in Palestinian territories, readers have an embarrassment of global riches to choose from.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
The deal Paramount Pictures, on behalf of Plan B Entertainment (Brad Pitt's production company), options "Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction" by David Sheff and "Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines" by his son, Nic Sheff, about their family's struggle with the boy's addiction. The two books would be made into one movie. The players Jeremy Kleiner and Dede Gardner are producing, in association with Starbucks. David Sheff is represented on literary rights by Amanda Urban at International Creative Management.
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